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Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum epub download

by Irina Ivanova,Stephen Prosapio


I purchased Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum in 2013, and it has been on my back burner for several years, as I have thousands of books on my ereader

I dare you to step inside. ~ Geoffrey Edwards, author of Fire Bell in the Night. An original take on the classic haunting story that even the most jaded of horror fans can enjoy I purchased Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum in 2013, and it has been on my back burner for several years, as I have thousands of books on my ereader. I read it in one sitting and absolutely loved it.

Cover design by Irina Ivanova. Author photo courtesy of Robert Rossi. This is a work of fiction.

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum book. Irina Ivanova (Designer)

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum book. Irina Ivanova (Designer). Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum tells the story of Zach Kalusky, paranormal investigator and budding television star who is haunted in his own special way.

com, Stephen wrote his first novel, Dream War.

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum. 996 beğenme Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum bir gönderi paylaştı. Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum bir gönderi paylaştı. Does anyone out there record Dateline? Apparently a recent episode reported on a murder suspect’s alibi being that he was home reading his Kindle.

Sara managed to brave the stench of whiskey on Winkler’s breath and get in his face. All of them fires wuz just weeds. That tree was a hundred years old!. That tree was a hundred years old! rned oak, but it caused his body to tilt. He almost lost his balance and stumbled, but then righted himself. And I bet you kids had something to do with it!. You’ve got no proof-nothing at all to back that up- All’s I’m saying is that if I say you’re gone, you pack your shit and go ‘cuz you’re gone!. Unfocused as they were, its effect was muted

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 6. 5% restored. Главная Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum. Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum. Published by Otherworld Publications LLC (2011)

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum. com, Stephen wrote his first novel, Dream War. Competing against 2,676 other novels, it won a Top Five Finalist award in Gather. com's 2007 First Chapters contest. Dream War was released as an eBook in July of 2010. Published by Otherworld Publications LLC (2011). ISBN 10: 1936593106 ISBN 13: 9781936593101.

Zach Kalusky, host of Sci-D TV's Xavier Paranormal Investigators, is ecstatic when he's given the opportunity to explore the most haunted site in Chicago for a Halloween Special: Rosewood Asylum, a place long made off-limits by the local government, plagued by decades of mysterious fires and unexplained events. It's Zach's dream investigation- but there's a catch: the network forces Xavier Paranormal Investigators to partner with the more dramatic-but less ethical-Demon Hunters. Now, Zach must fight for both his show's integrity and his team's loyalty while trying to protect his own secret: that he, himself, is possessed.

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum epub download

ISBN13: 978-1936593101

ISBN: 1936593106

Author: Irina Ivanova,Stephen Prosapio

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Otherworld Publications LLC (May 10, 2011)

Pages: 294 pages

ePUB size: 1452 kb

FB2 size: 1463 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 647

Other Formats: mobi mbr txt lrf

Related to Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum ePub books

Arashigore
(Cross-posted from Adarna SF book blog)

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum is a paranormal suspense/contemporary fantasy novel with a fun and original premise. It's about a reality show that investigates paranormal activity, and the investigators are students from the Catholic Saint Xavier University in Chicago. Zach is a pretty ordinary guy working on his PhD in Psychology... other than the fact that he's worried about network ratings, he's possessed by the spirit of his dead uncle, and the abandoned asylum he's investigating has something in it that's keen on setting him and his team ablaze.

The prologue was okay, but it was chapter one that won me over. I was instantly charmed by Zach, and the story moves quickly into the world of supernatural investigations, TV production politics, and the creepy grounds of Rosewood Asylum.

I truly enjoyed the TV production aspect to this book-it's interesting how it structures the investigation and the interactions between the characters. There are several scenes where the characters would have the real interaction (greeting each other or relaying information), then they'd have to do it all over again and adjust their dialogue for the camera. It was enlightening and it cracked me up. The rivalry between the two paranormal groups is amusing ("the Demon Hunters looked like a pack of Hells Angels who'd ridden their motorcycles through the entire length of a circus train") and a lot of scheming takes place. Other than having an evil spirit/arsonist on the premises, they also have casting/promotion politics and planted evidence to deal with.

An abandoned insane asylum isn't the most original location for a paranormal investigation, but Prosapio brings such a convincing history to the setting that I wouldn't be surprised if it was a real place. The causes of the asylum's haunted fate are tied to real events in Chicago, adding a richness to the world-building.

While the characters, setting, and subplots are great, the central paranormal plot is a bit predictable. There were key points that I saw coming from a mile away. A character was introduced early in the book, and I wrote a comment on my Kindle: "It's gonna be revealed eventually that this person is dead all along Sixth Sense-style". Yep-it happened. And I suppose exorcism-style books could only really end in one way, especially if the author is working on a sequel. Maybe I'm just not as attuned with this genre, but I wish that the author would subvert paranormal tropes a bit more.

Also, some lines came off a bit weird at first. In a scene where Zach and a psychic consultant exchange movie lines as they greet each other, the narration explains that these lines are significant because the consultant resembles the lead of the film and "it also mocked the stereotype that black people, at least those not practicing Voodoo in New Orleans, weren't psychic and never dabbled in the occult." I was confused by that comment until later on, I realized that consultant was African-American himself, and this is a book where the protagonist is a white Catholic boy possessed by the spirit of his dead uncle. I guess it wasn't immediately clear to me that this was part of the fantasy world-building.

The central plot could've had more surprises, but it's still fun novel overall and the other story elements make it a refreshing read. Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum is a well-written book and it's recommended if you're into the paranormal genre. Give the sample a try-I'd be surprised if chapter one didn't suck you in instantly.

Note: A free review copy was provided by the author.
Arashigore
(Cross-posted from Adarna SF book blog)

Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum is a paranormal suspense/contemporary fantasy novel with a fun and original premise. It's about a reality show that investigates paranormal activity, and the investigators are students from the Catholic Saint Xavier University in Chicago. Zach is a pretty ordinary guy working on his PhD in Psychology... other than the fact that he's worried about network ratings, he's possessed by the spirit of his dead uncle, and the abandoned asylum he's investigating has something in it that's keen on setting him and his team ablaze.

The prologue was okay, but it was chapter one that won me over. I was instantly charmed by Zach, and the story moves quickly into the world of supernatural investigations, TV production politics, and the creepy grounds of Rosewood Asylum.

I truly enjoyed the TV production aspect to this book-it's interesting how it structures the investigation and the interactions between the characters. There are several scenes where the characters would have the real interaction (greeting each other or relaying information), then they'd have to do it all over again and adjust their dialogue for the camera. It was enlightening and it cracked me up. The rivalry between the two paranormal groups is amusing ("the Demon Hunters looked like a pack of Hells Angels who'd ridden their motorcycles through the entire length of a circus train") and a lot of scheming takes place. Other than having an evil spirit/arsonist on the premises, they also have casting/promotion politics and planted evidence to deal with.

An abandoned insane asylum isn't the most original location for a paranormal investigation, but Prosapio brings such a convincing history to the setting that I wouldn't be surprised if it was a real place. The causes of the asylum's haunted fate are tied to real events in Chicago, adding a richness to the world-building.

While the characters, setting, and subplots are great, the central paranormal plot is a bit predictable. There were key points that I saw coming from a mile away. A character was introduced early in the book, and I wrote a comment on my Kindle: "It's gonna be revealed eventually that this person is dead all along Sixth Sense-style". Yep-it happened. And I suppose exorcism-style books could only really end in one way, especially if the author is working on a sequel. Maybe I'm just not as attuned with this genre, but I wish that the author would subvert paranormal tropes a bit more.

Also, some lines came off a bit weird at first. In a scene where Zach and a psychic consultant exchange movie lines as they greet each other, the narration explains that these lines are significant because the consultant resembles the lead of the film and "it also mocked the stereotype that black people, at least those not practicing Voodoo in New Orleans, weren't psychic and never dabbled in the occult." I was confused by that comment until later on, I realized that consultant was African-American himself, and this is a book where the protagonist is a white Catholic boy possessed by the spirit of his dead uncle. I guess it wasn't immediately clear to me that this was part of the fantasy world-building.

The central plot could've had more surprises, but it's still fun novel overall and the other story elements make it a refreshing read. Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum is a well-written book and it's recommended if you're into the paranormal genre. Give the sample a try-I'd be surprised if chapter one didn't suck you in instantly.

Note: A free review copy was provided by the author.
Browelali
Zach Kalusky is the head of the paranormal team, Xavier Paranormal Investigators (XPI) and host of the Sci-D television series with the same name. Zach is considered a professional investigator and his findings are respected within the paranormal community. When Sci-D executives insist that Zach team up with another, less ethical paranormal team he has serious reservations. The Demon Hunters are known for their flashy style and fabricated evidence. Unfortunately, Zach has no choice. Rosewood Asylum has been declared a city landmark and it needs to be declared spirit-free once and for all. The Sci-D network has been commissioned with the task. Will the two teams find evidence of spirit activity? Will Zach's own possession help or hinder the investigation?

Stephen Prosapio is clearly a fan of paranormal shows. As am I, this is why I chose this book in the first place. I wondered at first how much of the main character was fashioned after Zak Bagans of Ghost Adventures, but came to the conclusion the two weren't overly similar. The book does read a little like a combination of Ghost Adventures, Paranormal State and Ghost Hunters, but is unique in its own right. The author has included some distinctive differences, as well as several unexpected twists and turns. Zach's possession is more than simple possession - stigmata is involved, which added an additional element to the plot. There are some religious undertones at play - aka good vs. evil, Zach's Catholic background, etc.

The story dragged a bit here and there. There was a great deal of "ruminating" over who had betrayed the team. There were a lot of bros punching each other "in the meaty part of the arm". Some of the banter between characters struck me as somewhat juvenile. All things considered, I'd say Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum is worth reading if you enjoy a paranormal story with a twist.
Browelali
Zach Kalusky is the head of the paranormal team, Xavier Paranormal Investigators (XPI) and host of the Sci-D television series with the same name. Zach is considered a professional investigator and his findings are respected within the paranormal community. When Sci-D executives insist that Zach team up with another, less ethical paranormal team he has serious reservations. The Demon Hunters are known for their flashy style and fabricated evidence. Unfortunately, Zach has no choice. Rosewood Asylum has been declared a city landmark and it needs to be declared spirit-free once and for all. The Sci-D network has been commissioned with the task. Will the two teams find evidence of spirit activity? Will Zach's own possession help or hinder the investigation?

Stephen Prosapio is clearly a fan of paranormal shows. As am I, this is why I chose this book in the first place. I wondered at first how much of the main character was fashioned after Zak Bagans of Ghost Adventures, but came to the conclusion the two weren't overly similar. The book does read a little like a combination of Ghost Adventures, Paranormal State and Ghost Hunters, but is unique in its own right. The author has included some distinctive differences, as well as several unexpected twists and turns. Zach's possession is more than simple possession - stigmata is involved, which added an additional element to the plot. There are some religious undertones at play - aka good vs. evil, Zach's Catholic background, etc.

The story dragged a bit here and there. There was a great deal of "ruminating" over who had betrayed the team. There were a lot of bros punching each other "in the meaty part of the arm". Some of the banter between characters struck me as somewhat juvenile. All things considered, I'd say Ghosts of Rosewood Asylum is worth reading if you enjoy a paranormal story with a twist.
THOMAS
hmm. This was a good book minus a few things that drove me batty. Let's go through the good first. This book is certainly not like other books. The entire thing is truly unusual. This book is part murder mystery, part ghost story, part demonology, part...well honestly it is a little bit of everything. What I liked about this book was that after it got going, it was a fun read and you had a certain level of expectation in the back of your mind about the way it would go. It never goes the way you think it might, which was actually part of the joy. I hate it when you can guess exactly what is going to happen next in any story. You can't do that with this book. with multiple story-lines going on at the same time, almost anyone can find something to keep them entertained while reading this book. The dialog in this book is funny and at times the saving grace for the areas of the book that still could use a bit of polishing. I thought the author did a good job of giving his characters life and making them interesting.

That being said, there were some things about this book that I found annoying. If this book is supposed to be a spine tingling read, there needs to be a bit more ghostly activity. This book intrigued me, but it never frightened me the way I always think a good paranormal read should have the power to do. After all, that's why I read them. If I wanted just a mystery, I would have picked up one of those instead. Having so many characters to introduce at the beginning of the book left me struggling a little bit to make sense of the flood of information.

There were things I liked about this book and things I did not, but for the most part it was a good read. I was stuck between three and four stars for a while, but I think just with the complexities of this story alone, it earned four stars. Give it a try if you are looking for something kind of unusual and fun to read.
THOMAS
hmm. This was a good book minus a few things that drove me batty. Let's go through the good first. This book is certainly not like other books. The entire thing is truly unusual. This book is part murder mystery, part ghost story, part demonology, part...well honestly it is a little bit of everything. What I liked about this book was that after it got going, it was a fun read and you had a certain level of expectation in the back of your mind about the way it would go. It never goes the way you think it might, which was actually part of the joy. I hate it when you can guess exactly what is going to happen next in any story. You can't do that with this book. with multiple story-lines going on at the same time, almost anyone can find something to keep them entertained while reading this book. The dialog in this book is funny and at times the saving grace for the areas of the book that still could use a bit of polishing. I thought the author did a good job of giving his characters life and making them interesting.

That being said, there were some things about this book that I found annoying. If this book is supposed to be a spine tingling read, there needs to be a bit more ghostly activity. This book intrigued me, but it never frightened me the way I always think a good paranormal read should have the power to do. After all, that's why I read them. If I wanted just a mystery, I would have picked up one of those instead. Having so many characters to introduce at the beginning of the book left me struggling a little bit to make sense of the flood of information.

There were things I liked about this book and things I did not, but for the most part it was a good read. I was stuck between three and four stars for a while, but I think just with the complexities of this story alone, it earned four stars. Give it a try if you are looking for something kind of unusual and fun to read.