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Close Quarters (To the End of the Earth) epub download

by William Golding


To the Ends of the Earth is the name given to a trilogy of nautical, relational novels-Rites of Passage (1980), Close Quarters (1987), and Fire Down Below (1989)-by British author William Golding.

To the Ends of the Earth is the name given to a trilogy of nautical, relational novels-Rites of Passage (1980), Close Quarters (1987), and Fire Down Below (1989)-by British author William Golding. Set on a former British man-of-war transporting migrants to Australia in the early 19th century, the novels explore themes of class (assumed status) and man's reversion to savagery when isolated, in this case, the closed society of the ship's passengers and crew.

Home William Golding To the Ends of the Earth. Rites of Passage was first published in 1980 and Close Quarters in 1987. I did not refer back to the one book as I wrote the other, relying on my unaided memory which proved to be somewhat defective. To the ends of the earth, . I kept in mind certain examples of people who, when publishing several volumes under one cover, had made major alterations to the text and in my opinion seriously damaged their original work. I have corrected some errors of historical fact.

Entweder hatte der Autor keine Lust mehr oder es gab einen Abgabetermin oder beides. Teil 2 von "To the Ends of the Earth", und einer der faulsten Schlüsse, die ich je bei einem Buch gesehen habe. Der Erzähler ist in Seenot, dann ist er in Seenot und dann immer noch in Seenot. Mittendrin heißt es "Postskriptum" und man erfährt, dass er sich jetzt an Land befindet und einen dritten Band seiner Aufzeichnungen plant, aus dem man dann möglicherweise erfahren wird, WARUM er nicht mehr in Seenot ist.

Get books you want The Double Tongue is William Golding's last and perhaps most superbly . The Scorpion God depicts a challenge to primal authority as the god-ruler of an ancient civilization lingers near death.

The Double Tongue is William Golding's last and perhaps most superbly imaginative novel. It is a fictional memoir of an aged prophetess at Delphi, the most sacred oracle of ancient Greece, just prior to Greece's domination by the Roman Empire. The Scorpion God: Three Short Novels. To the Ends of the Earth.

This article is about the trilogy of novels by William Golding. For the Hillsong United album, see To the Ends of the Earth (album). Close Quarters was published seven years after the original book, though in the book the writing continues not long after the first journal was completed. For 1948 film, see To the Ends of the Earth (film). This book begins with Edmund Talbot starting a new journal, but with a different tone as this was not to be presented to his godfather.

Sequel to the Man Booker Prize-winning Rites of Passage To the Ends of the Earth. The second part of Golding's sea trilogy sees the young, self important Edmund Talbot learn some harsh new lessons in life as the ship slowly carries on its journey to the antipodes

Sequel to the Man Booker Prize-winning Rites of Passage To the Ends of the Earth. The second part of Golding's sea trilogy sees the young, self important Edmund Talbot learn some harsh new lessons in life as the ship slowly carries on its journey to the antipodes. Whilst scuppered in the tropics, a ship is spotted. First thought to be an enemy vessel, it turns out to be the Alcyone headed for India. It brings the news that Napoleon is defeated, and an 'entertainment' is arranged aboard ships where Talbot falls in love with Miss Chumley.

A feat of imaginative reconstruction, as vivid as a dream. Laden to the waterline with a rich cargo of practicalities and poetry, pain and hilarity, drama and exaltation. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

But the end of the Earth? That's happening even if something like this . The far future of Earth is known; the near-term future is up to us to create.

But the end of the Earth? That's happening even if something like this never does. A massive object passes close by the Earth, gravitationally ejecting it from the Solar System and the galaxy entirely, where it wanders in obscurity throughout the empty cosmos for eternity. Or it remains bound to the Sun's corpse, and slowly, over countless orbits, spirals into our stellar remnant, where it's swallowed by the black dwarf that dominates whatever's left of our Solar System.

To the Ends of the Earth, William Golding's great sea trilogy, presents the extraordinary story of a warship's troubled journey to Australia . To the Ends of the Earth: 1. Rites of Passage 2. Close Quarters 3. Fire Down Below.

To the Ends of the Earth, William Golding's great sea trilogy, presents the extraordinary story of a warship's troubled journey to Australia in the early 1800s. Told through the pages of Edmund Talbot's journal-with equal measure of wit and disdain-it records the mounting tensions and growing misfortunes aboard the ancient ship. An instant maritime classic, and one of Golding's finest achievements, the trilogy was adapted into a major BBC/PBS Masterpiece miniseries staring Benedict Cumberbatch, Jared Harris and Sam Neill

The enthralling sequel to Golding's Booker Prize-winning 1980 novel, Rites of Passage, continuing the story of the 18th-century fighting ship carrying passengers and cargo from England to Australia.

Close Quarters (To the End of the Earth) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0374125103

ISBN: 0374125104

Author: William Golding

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (June 1, 1987)

Pages: 288 pages

ePUB size: 1658 kb

FB2 size: 1819 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 169

Other Formats: mbr doc azw lrf

Related to Close Quarters (To the End of the Earth) ePub books

Windworker
The second book in Golding's Sea Trilogy. Utterly absorbing and entertaining. The story of a long sea voyage from Britain to Australia is seen through the eyes of a young Englishman of privilege, writing in his journal. Along with him the reader experiences the many perils that travelers in those days (1813) routinely encountered, along with the joys of discovery and a growing consciousness. The British class system is in full force, even at sea, and much of the tale revolves around its influences, for better and for worse. The conditions of daily life aboard one of His Majesty's sailing vessels were pretty dire, even for well-off passengers like the novel's narrator. For immigrants, who lived completely below decks under appalling hardships for months on end, only the promise of a better life at the end of the journey made such a trip endurable at all.
The language, while ornate, is clear and bracing - like sea air. There is much dark humor and not a little pathos. Stunning!
Windworker
The second book in Golding's Sea Trilogy. Utterly absorbing and entertaining. The story of a long sea voyage from Britain to Australia is seen through the eyes of a young Englishman of privilege, writing in his journal. Along with him the reader experiences the many perils that travelers in those days (1813) routinely encountered, along with the joys of discovery and a growing consciousness. The British class system is in full force, even at sea, and much of the tale revolves around its influences, for better and for worse. The conditions of daily life aboard one of His Majesty's sailing vessels were pretty dire, even for well-off passengers like the novel's narrator. For immigrants, who lived completely below decks under appalling hardships for months on end, only the promise of a better life at the end of the journey made such a trip endurable at all.
The language, while ornate, is clear and bracing - like sea air. There is much dark humor and not a little pathos. Stunning!
Zolorn
In his sequel to “Rites of Passage,” Golding sets aside the epistolary format, and the novel finds a unique rhythm and voice. Following the adventures of young Talbot after the tragedy of Parson Colley, the novel is pitched often as a fever dream, with our protagonist alternating between various ailments and traumas that lend an unreliability to most of the events that transpire around him. Here, our young and ambitious narrator experiences a taste of combat, a hint of love, and the literal terror of his world falling apart.
Golding, the author of “Lord of the Flies” pursues one of his favorite themes, the breakdown of society in extremis. A few moments inattention by a sloppy officer creates a dire situation for the passengers and crew of our decrepit warship. The well intentioned lies and conceits that permeate the official response to existential danger only serve to shred morale and faith in the few institutions that kept our small society running outside the sight of land.
The book ends in a cliffhanger, though an awkward one. Talbot, an unreliable and naive narrator, lends enough humor through his inflated ego and belated comeuppance to balance the peril at hand, and it helps that the novel sets a number of clues that all will probably be resolved well in the end.
Zolorn
In his sequel to “Rites of Passage,” Golding sets aside the epistolary format, and the novel finds a unique rhythm and voice. Following the adventures of young Talbot after the tragedy of Parson Colley, the novel is pitched often as a fever dream, with our protagonist alternating between various ailments and traumas that lend an unreliability to most of the events that transpire around him. Here, our young and ambitious narrator experiences a taste of combat, a hint of love, and the literal terror of his world falling apart.
Golding, the author of “Lord of the Flies” pursues one of his favorite themes, the breakdown of society in extremis. A few moments inattention by a sloppy officer creates a dire situation for the passengers and crew of our decrepit warship. The well intentioned lies and conceits that permeate the official response to existential danger only serve to shred morale and faith in the few institutions that kept our small society running outside the sight of land.
The book ends in a cliffhanger, though an awkward one. Talbot, an unreliable and naive narrator, lends enough humor through his inflated ego and belated comeuppance to balance the peril at hand, and it helps that the novel sets a number of clues that all will probably be resolved well in the end.
HappyLove
The second part of Golding's sea trilogy sees the young, self important Edmund Talbot learn some harsh new lessons in life as the ship slowly carries on its journey to the antipodes. Whilst scuppered in the tropics, a ship is spotted. First thought to be an enemy vessel, it turns out to be the Alcyone headed for India. It brings the news that Napoleon is defeated, and an 'entertainment' is arranged aboard ships where Talbot falls in love with Miss Chumley. But it is a pathetic love that dissolves when the ships part and tensions rise when Lt Benet from the Alcyone swaps ships due to an indiscretion and the rotten state of the ship means they are a long way from Sydney Cove and in danger of sinking...
A trademark Golding novel (he was a seaman himself) that is erudite, humorous and viewing society through the microcosm of life aboard a ship and the pressures on the comfortable order of things on shore.
Written some years after the first novel in the series (Rites of Passage) I did find I had to re read that novel in order to re familiarise myself with everyone and everything, but it is a testimony to Golding's greatness as a writer that 'Close Quarters' carries on the tale seamlessly.
HappyLove
The second part of Golding's sea trilogy sees the young, self important Edmund Talbot learn some harsh new lessons in life as the ship slowly carries on its journey to the antipodes. Whilst scuppered in the tropics, a ship is spotted. First thought to be an enemy vessel, it turns out to be the Alcyone headed for India. It brings the news that Napoleon is defeated, and an 'entertainment' is arranged aboard ships where Talbot falls in love with Miss Chumley. But it is a pathetic love that dissolves when the ships part and tensions rise when Lt Benet from the Alcyone swaps ships due to an indiscretion and the rotten state of the ship means they are a long way from Sydney Cove and in danger of sinking...
A trademark Golding novel (he was a seaman himself) that is erudite, humorous and viewing society through the microcosm of life aboard a ship and the pressures on the comfortable order of things on shore.
Written some years after the first novel in the series (Rites of Passage) I did find I had to re read that novel in order to re familiarise myself with everyone and everything, but it is a testimony to Golding's greatness as a writer that 'Close Quarters' carries on the tale seamlessly.
Owomed
This is the second book in Golding's "To the Ends of the Earth" trilogy. I first got hooked on these books after watching the made-for-TV adaptation on PBS (Masterpiece Theatre). I thought it looked like it would be an interesting read, and it has been! Although the sailing details are interesting, for me the best part of the book is reading about the clashes of the levels of society back then. The narrator of the series is Edmund Talbot, who is "high society" with connections. In fact, he's partly jokingly referred to as "Lord Talbot" because of his airs. He is at times pompous, self-centered and not very likeable--which makes this book even more fun to read since everything is from his point of view.

An exciting book, and I highly recommend it!
Owomed
This is the second book in Golding's "To the Ends of the Earth" trilogy. I first got hooked on these books after watching the made-for-TV adaptation on PBS (Masterpiece Theatre). I thought it looked like it would be an interesting read, and it has been! Although the sailing details are interesting, for me the best part of the book is reading about the clashes of the levels of society back then. The narrator of the series is Edmund Talbot, who is "high society" with connections. In fact, he's partly jokingly referred to as "Lord Talbot" because of his airs. He is at times pompous, self-centered and not very likeable--which makes this book even more fun to read since everything is from his point of view.

An exciting book, and I highly recommend it!
Uriel
I returned this book as I found out later it was included in "To the Ends of the Earth".
Uriel
I returned this book as I found out later it was included in "To the Ends of the Earth".