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Mr Midshipman Easy (Classics of Naval Fiction) epub download

by Captain Frederick Marryat


Oddly, even though the author was himself a retired British naval post-captain (who served under Cochrane when he was himself a midshipman!), there is relatively little focus on the nautical details, and a whole lot of focus on the characters. Sure, there's a gale (and quite a good one), and some beam to beam broadside action, but mostly it's about the characters.

MR MIDSHIPMAN EASY 1 Acquisitiveness 22 Hope 2 Agreeableness 23 Human Nature 3 Alimentiveness 24 Ideality 4 Amativeness 25 Imitation 5. .by. Captain Frederick Marryat.

MR MIDSHIPMAN EASY 1 Acquisitiveness 22 Hope 2 Agreeableness 23 Human Nature 3 Alimentiveness 24 Ideality 4 Amativeness 25 Imitation 5 Benevolence 2. Classics of nautical fiction series. McBOOKS PRESS, INC. Ithaca, new york.

Mr Midshipman Easy Classics of Naval Fiction.

With this duo, published in 1829 and 1836, respectively, McBooks launches its new "Classics of Nautical Fiction. Marryat was a skipper in the British Navy, and the action here is based on his real experiences before the mast. Captain Frederick Marryat (1792–1848) was an actual 19th-century British naval hero who lived a saga worthy of the novels of . Forester and Patrick O'Brian. He survived fifty naval battles on the crack frigate Imperieuse under Lord Cochrane-the real-life model for Horatio Hornblower and Jack Aubrey. Mr Midshipman Easy Classics of Naval Fiction.

Midshipman Easy By Frederick Marryat. Actions & Adventure. If you enjoy the works of Frederick Marryat then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. History & Fiction. Captain Frederick Marryat (10 July 1792 – 9 August 1848) was a British Royal Navy officer, novelist, and an acquaintance of Charles Dickens, noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story.

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Author: Frederick Marryat. Mr. Midshipman Easy is said to have been inspired by Cochrane's adventures as a young midshipman

Author: Frederick Marryat. Street Date: September 1, 1997. Midshipman Easy is said to have been inspired by Cochrane's adventures as a young midshipman. If the item details above aren’t accurate or complete, we want to know about it. Report incorrect product info.

Captain Frederick Marryat CB FRS (10 July 1792 – 9 August 1848) was a Royal Navy officer, a novelist, and an acquaintance of Charles Dickens. He is noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story, particularly for his l novel Mr Midshipman Easy (1836), for his children's novel The Children of the New Forest (1847), and for a widely used system of maritime flag signalling known as Marryat's Code.

The work begins as a satire on Jack’s attachment to the rights of man that may try the listener’s patience. But despair not, for the story soon settles down as the philosophical midshipman begins his many triumphs over bullies, foul weather, and various damned foreigners of murderous intent

Read online books written by Captain Frederick Marryat in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author Captain Frederick Marryat. Books by Captain Frederick Marryat: Mr Midshipman Easy.

Read online books written by Captain Frederick Marryat in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of Mr Midshipman Easy at ReadAnyBook. 10 8.

A rollicking sea adventure, set in the time of the Napoleonic Wars, this book follows the escapades of a young midshipman who enters the King's service with some ideas that run badly afoul of the standards of naval discipline!

Mr Midshipman Easy (Classics of Naval Fiction) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0935526400

ISBN: 0935526404

Author: Captain Frederick Marryat

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: McBooks Press (September 1, 1997)

Pages: 352 pages

ePUB size: 1478 kb

FB2 size: 1772 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 442

Other Formats: lrf lrf doc lit

Related to Mr Midshipman Easy (Classics of Naval Fiction) ePub books

Erennge
This book's an odd kettle of fish. It focuses on Jack Easy, starting at his birth, following him through school and into the Navy. He joins to press his socialist philosophy of the "equality of man". The book was first published in 1836, when Karl Marx was 18. Zeitgeist, perhaps?

In tone, the book's half nautical fiction along the lines of O'Brian, Forester, Pope, etc., and half 17th century romantic farce that sees a rival found out in women's clothing, diabolical happenings at a costume ball, the come-uppance of a conniving father-confessor, a hilarious three-way duel, and more. The situations will be all the funnier if you've read more "serious" nautical fiction before this.

Oddly, even though the author was himself a retired British naval post-captain (who served under Cochrane when he was himself a midshipman!), there is relatively little focus on the nautical details, and a whole lot of focus on the characters. Sure, there's a gale (and quite a good one), and some beam to beam broadside action, but mostly it's about the characters. In every situation, there's little tension as we know our hero will make good a Hornblower-like escape by some indirect means.

The author jumps in as the omniscient narrator from time to time. For instance, there's one chapter that's an odd repetition of an argument made in a previous book against overly harsh punishment in the service.

The wisdom's along the lines of "spare the rod, spoil the child" and the character "development" sees Mr. Easy move from channeling Marx to channeling Ayn Rand. As the earlier positions are argued as hard as the latter, it's actually hard to see the author's position here, which is quite interesting.

Overall, though, the book just doesn't hang together as a continuous, tense story about the sea, which is one of the main reasons to read nautical fiction. On the other hand, if you've run out of the better nautical fiction, this one's well worth a read. A more interesting genre piece from this era is Wilkie Collins's mystery "The Moonstone".
Erennge
This book's an odd kettle of fish. It focuses on Jack Easy, starting at his birth, following him through school and into the Navy. He joins to press his socialist philosophy of the "equality of man". The book was first published in 1836, when Karl Marx was 18. Zeitgeist, perhaps?

In tone, the book's half nautical fiction along the lines of O'Brian, Forester, Pope, etc., and half 17th century romantic farce that sees a rival found out in women's clothing, diabolical happenings at a costume ball, the come-uppance of a conniving father-confessor, a hilarious three-way duel, and more. The situations will be all the funnier if you've read more "serious" nautical fiction before this.

Oddly, even though the author was himself a retired British naval post-captain (who served under Cochrane when he was himself a midshipman!), there is relatively little focus on the nautical details, and a whole lot of focus on the characters. Sure, there's a gale (and quite a good one), and some beam to beam broadside action, but mostly it's about the characters. In every situation, there's little tension as we know our hero will make good a Hornblower-like escape by some indirect means.

The author jumps in as the omniscient narrator from time to time. For instance, there's one chapter that's an odd repetition of an argument made in a previous book against overly harsh punishment in the service.

The wisdom's along the lines of "spare the rod, spoil the child" and the character "development" sees Mr. Easy move from channeling Marx to channeling Ayn Rand. As the earlier positions are argued as hard as the latter, it's actually hard to see the author's position here, which is quite interesting.

Overall, though, the book just doesn't hang together as a continuous, tense story about the sea, which is one of the main reasons to read nautical fiction. On the other hand, if you've run out of the better nautical fiction, this one's well worth a read. A more interesting genre piece from this era is Wilkie Collins's mystery "The Moonstone".
GawelleN
Okay, I finished both Hornblower and Aubrey/Maturin, and I needed somewhere to turn. Better than I expected, and certainly a novel in and of itself. Makes me curious re the remaining novels.
GawelleN
Okay, I finished both Hornblower and Aubrey/Maturin, and I needed somewhere to turn. Better than I expected, and certainly a novel in and of itself. Makes me curious re the remaining novels.
Purebinder
Written over 150 years ago it's perhaps a testimony to the quality of the book that it's even readable today. The quality of the characters I think is excellent and reveals many of the issues and challenges of the time, wealth and poverty, Gentlemen "buying" commissions etc. The dialog on the rights of man get s a bit tedious, and it's hard to imagine anyone getting away with anything like "our Hero" did ( 8 thousand pounds a year or not!), but its easy to see the genealogy of all subsequent books (Hornblower et al). Overall for fans of Naval history and literature worthwhile
Purebinder
Written over 150 years ago it's perhaps a testimony to the quality of the book that it's even readable today. The quality of the characters I think is excellent and reveals many of the issues and challenges of the time, wealth and poverty, Gentlemen "buying" commissions etc. The dialog on the rights of man get s a bit tedious, and it's hard to imagine anyone getting away with anything like "our Hero" did ( 8 thousand pounds a year or not!), but its easy to see the genealogy of all subsequent books (Hornblower et al). Overall for fans of Naval history and literature worthwhile
Villo
I ordered this book, almost by accident. I started reading it and could not put it down. Fun stuff and great adventures to be had.
Villo
I ordered this book, almost by accident. I started reading it and could not put it down. Fun stuff and great adventures to be had.
Iseared
Older novel that is mildly entertaining. I really cannot recommend this. The Nathan Gage series is much better. Even Flashgun is a superior read.
Iseared
Older novel that is mildly entertaining. I really cannot recommend this. The Nathan Gage series is much better. Even Flashgun is a superior read.
Wetiwavas
Still like Hornblower?Forester better. In fact, a lot better. I mean, come on, get on a boat or a ship already!
Wetiwavas
Still like Hornblower?Forester better. In fact, a lot better. I mean, come on, get on a boat or a ship already!
Ffel
Sailors always love to read about the sea if we can't be "out there." Books like this give "mental health vacations" when I need a break.
Ffel
Sailors always love to read about the sea if we can't be "out there." Books like this give "mental health vacations" when I need a break.
Great summer reading. Light and funny.
Great summer reading. Light and funny.