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The Midwife's Tale: A Novel epub download

by Gretchen Moran Laskas


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The Midwife's Tale book.

The Acknowledgements section demonstrates that Gretchen Moran Laskas, an eighth generation .

She is careful to note that many of the herbal remedies are now considered dangerous and to offer more modern references. I recommend the book as an interesting and worthwhile read. The Midwife's Tale was much better reading the first part of the story and then wandered off to supernatural events towards the end of the book which seemed kind of odd. Overall, the writing is fairly good and the author knows how to turn a phrase.

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About The Midwife’s Tale. I come from a long line of midwives, narrates Elizabeth Whitely

About The Midwife’s Tale. I come from a long line of midwives, narrates Elizabeth Whitely. I was expected to follow Mama, follow Granny, follow Great-granny. About Gretchen Moran Laskas. Gretchen Moran Laskas is an eighth-generation West Virginian. She now lives in Virginia with her husband and son.

Author of the novels, THE MIDWIFE'S TALE and THE MINER'S DAUGHTER. I've been married to Karl Laskas, since 1990.

Novelist · 1992 to present. Author of THE MIDWIFE'S TALE (2003) and THE MINER'S DAUGHTER (2007). University of Pittsburgh. Author of the novels, THE MIDWIFE'S TALE and THE MINER'S DAUGHTER. After 20 years in Virginia, we have finally made possible a lifelong dream to live overseas, and are now living and working in Ireland. We have two children, a college age son, and a preschooler daughter, both of whom keep our lives busy and interesting.

Family saga and first novel by Laskas (stories: Fifty Acres and a Poodle, 2000) about the travails of three generations of backwoods women who serve as midwives. The Whitely women have been midwives for as long as any of their West Virginia neighbors can remember. We enter their world through the eyes of Elizabeth Whitely, a teenager in the years just before WWI and somewhat reluctantly learning the trade from her mother. Elizabeth is a bit delicate for the grueling work of midwifery-and horrified at its seamier aspects, like the mercy killings that are sometimes asked for.

A Midwife's Tale" is a solid, intelligent book, the compelling story of Elizabeth Whitely .

A Midwife's Tale" is a solid, intelligent book, the compelling story of Elizabeth Whitely, last in a long line of midwives who have served the women and children of a remote West Virginia valley for generations. It begins prior to World War I when Elizabeth, training under her mother, discovers the brutal dark side of midwifery. It is the first of the harsh realities of life she will face. It is rare to find a novel that is has such a strong voice, is evocative, literary and still good old fashioned story telling, but Laskas has written one. And a fine novel this is down to the happy ending, one of the hardest things to carry off. I stayed up till 2AM to finish this book, and cried at the end.

I come from a long line of midwives, narrates Elizabeth Whitely.

Books By This Author. Gretchen Moran Laskas. Fiction, Virginia, Infertility, female, Mothers and daughters, Midwives.

“I come from a long line of midwives,” narrates Elizabeth Whitely. “I was expected to follow Mama, follow Granny, follow Great-granny. In the end, I didn’t disappoint them. Or perhaps I did. After all, there were no more midwives after me.”For generations, the women in Elizabeth’s family have brought life to Kettle Valley, West Virginia, heeding a destiny to tend its women with herbals, experience, and wisdom. But Elizabeth, who has comforted so many, has lost her heart to the one man who cannot reciprocate, even when she moves into his home to share his bed and raise his child. Then Lauren Denniker, Elizabeth’s adopted daughter, begins to display a miraculous gift--just as Elizabeth learns that she herself is unable to have a child. How Elizabeth comes to free herself from a loveless relationship, grapple with Lauren’s astonishing abilities, and come to terms with her own emptiness is the compelling heart of this remarkable tale. Incorporating the spirited mountain mythology of prewar Appalachia, Gretchen Laskas has crafted a story as true to our time as its own, and a cast of characters as poignant as they are entirely original.From the Hardcover edition.

The Midwife's Tale: A Novel epub download

ISBN13: 978-0385335546

ISBN: 0385335547

Author: Gretchen Moran Laskas

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Delta (March 2, 2004)

Pages: 258 pages

ePUB size: 1822 kb

FB2 size: 1970 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 569

Other Formats: txt doc lrf doc

Related to The Midwife's Tale: A Novel ePub books

Thordigda
I liked the historical look at rural West Virginia in the early 20th century in The Midwife’s Tale, and I found the main character to be likable. Even though the story was told from her perspective, I sometimes found the choices she made to be ill-considered and hasty; but perhaps they were realistic for her situation. I cared about what happened to her, which made the plot engaging. The characters were well developed and the natural setting well described in addition to the story being involving. Three strong themes that pervade the book are the importance of place, of family history, and of mother-daughter relationships. In addition, the reader of this book will learn about the historical importance of midwifery for rural women. The Acknowledgements section demonstrates that Gretchen Moran Laskas, an eighth generation West Virginian, did extensive research on history and culture and the midwifery practices and herbal remedies of the time. She is careful to note that many of the herbal remedies are now considered dangerous and to offer more modern references. I recommend the book as an interesting and worthwhile read.
Thordigda
I liked the historical look at rural West Virginia in the early 20th century in The Midwife’s Tale, and I found the main character to be likable. Even though the story was told from her perspective, I sometimes found the choices she made to be ill-considered and hasty; but perhaps they were realistic for her situation. I cared about what happened to her, which made the plot engaging. The characters were well developed and the natural setting well described in addition to the story being involving. Three strong themes that pervade the book are the importance of place, of family history, and of mother-daughter relationships. In addition, the reader of this book will learn about the historical importance of midwifery for rural women. The Acknowledgements section demonstrates that Gretchen Moran Laskas, an eighth generation West Virginian, did extensive research on history and culture and the midwifery practices and herbal remedies of the time. She is careful to note that many of the herbal remedies are now considered dangerous and to offer more modern references. I recommend the book as an interesting and worthwhile read.
Mustard Forgotten
I absolutely love book like this. I love reading about the mountain people in Appalachia and Virginia. It was a much simplier and complex time of life. The hardships of people and the way they lived makes us remember how strong they had to be just to survive day to day life. I would recommend this book to everyone that enjoys reading about mountain life and midwives. Truly a very good story.
Mustard Forgotten
I absolutely love book like this. I love reading about the mountain people in Appalachia and Virginia. It was a much simplier and complex time of life. The hardships of people and the way they lived makes us remember how strong they had to be just to survive day to day life. I would recommend this book to everyone that enjoys reading about mountain life and midwives. Truly a very good story.
Weiehan
The Midwife's Tale was much better reading the first part of the story and then wandered off to supernatural events towards the end of the book which seemed kind of odd. Overall, the writing is fairly good and the author knows how to turn a phrase.
Weiehan
The Midwife's Tale was much better reading the first part of the story and then wandered off to supernatural events towards the end of the book which seemed kind of odd. Overall, the writing is fairly good and the author knows how to turn a phrase.
Arar
I did not want to stop reading this when I finished it. It's a book you can touch with your heart. She's written this so well that you can feel and smell and hear the atmosphere of the mountain, the births, the deaths. You feel the anger and the hurt and the sweet release of forgiving yourself and others. This book is truly joyful. I will search out more books by Gretchen.
Arar
I did not want to stop reading this when I finished it. It's a book you can touch with your heart. She's written this so well that you can feel and smell and hear the atmosphere of the mountain, the births, the deaths. You feel the anger and the hurt and the sweet release of forgiving yourself and others. This book is truly joyful. I will search out more books by Gretchen.
Maucage
Good read in historical order. Although it is staged in the past, it is also mindful of your own life experiences. Who did you love, what did you do you wish you could do over again. I have five children who are all now grown but I think I would have liked a midwife, women understand childbirth, the good the bad, the pain, the horror and the joy.
Maucage
Good read in historical order. Although it is staged in the past, it is also mindful of your own life experiences. Who did you love, what did you do you wish you could do over again. I have five children who are all now grown but I think I would have liked a midwife, women understand childbirth, the good the bad, the pain, the horror and the joy.
Bort
This book crept up on me. At first I thought, yes, a pleasant read, nice mountainside, la-la-la. Then the characters pulled me in, and I found the story compelling and couldn't stop reading.

The young girl's apprenticeship to be a midwife, observing and not understanding at first, captured my imagination. And then, as she continues in her profession, trying to help women survive child-bearing and seeing their struggles as wives and mothers, I found myself thinking long and hard about the roles of women then and now, their courage or weakness in loves and losses, their generosity or greed when sick and when healthy, and ... this story captured my heart and mind as well.

I was humbled by the lives of mountain women who had few possessions and almost no physical comforts, and who often died in childbirth. And, of course, I was ruefully aware that the description of the blindness and foolishness of the protagonist could easily have been a description of my own.

(Hmmm. I've now read the previous reviews. I have to say that the people who slammed the book as being inauthentic in its language and dialects may lack experience of that part of the country. I have spent time in the Appalachian hollows (and, yes, the locals do call them "hollers"), and the language sounded unexceptionable to me. Also, according to my information, the author has been steeped in that culture since childhood. I suspect that the criticism says more about personal preference. If one wants a terse Hemingwayesque style, fine. If one doesn't care for the lyrical tone of a mountain storyteller by the fire, fine. But the quiet voice of such storytellers has a role in literature, and I value it.)

I will say that the ending did not entirely work for me, but the overall impact of the book was so important that I give it Five Stars.)
Bort
This book crept up on me. At first I thought, yes, a pleasant read, nice mountainside, la-la-la. Then the characters pulled me in, and I found the story compelling and couldn't stop reading.

The young girl's apprenticeship to be a midwife, observing and not understanding at first, captured my imagination. And then, as she continues in her profession, trying to help women survive child-bearing and seeing their struggles as wives and mothers, I found myself thinking long and hard about the roles of women then and now, their courage or weakness in loves and losses, their generosity or greed when sick and when healthy, and ... this story captured my heart and mind as well.

I was humbled by the lives of mountain women who had few possessions and almost no physical comforts, and who often died in childbirth. And, of course, I was ruefully aware that the description of the blindness and foolishness of the protagonist could easily have been a description of my own.

(Hmmm. I've now read the previous reviews. I have to say that the people who slammed the book as being inauthentic in its language and dialects may lack experience of that part of the country. I have spent time in the Appalachian hollows (and, yes, the locals do call them "hollers"), and the language sounded unexceptionable to me. Also, according to my information, the author has been steeped in that culture since childhood. I suspect that the criticism says more about personal preference. If one wants a terse Hemingwayesque style, fine. If one doesn't care for the lyrical tone of a mountain storyteller by the fire, fine. But the quiet voice of such storytellers has a role in literature, and I value it.)

I will say that the ending did not entirely work for me, but the overall impact of the book was so important that I give it Five Stars.)
Whitemaster
Main character was flat and emotionless, sometimes hateful and resentful, but not really likable. One subplot had some unexplained supernatural elements that made no sense. Other characters just disappeared. This would've been better off as a few character sketches or short stories, but not as a whole novel. Some great details, but overall, not much cohesiveness.
Whitemaster
Main character was flat and emotionless, sometimes hateful and resentful, but not really likable. One subplot had some unexplained supernatural elements that made no sense. Other characters just disappeared. This would've been better off as a few character sketches or short stories, but not as a whole novel. Some great details, but overall, not much cohesiveness.
The deals with childbirth & herbal medicines available in the eastern US at the turn of the 19th century as seen through the live of 4 generations of women. How they cope or fail is the story along with how it affects them. Enjoyable read.
The deals with childbirth & herbal medicines available in the eastern US at the turn of the 19th century as seen through the live of 4 generations of women. How they cope or fail is the story along with how it affects them. Enjoyable read.