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The Roman epub download

by Mika Toimi Waltari


I had hoped she would ask me who my father was so that I could ask after her name. But she was not as inquisitive as that. She looked at me as one looks on a troublesome fly, then poked among the heap of scrolls at her feet and handed me the first part of the book. Here you are, she said. Take it and leave me in peace from your advances.

A couple of young Gauls who had enlisted in the legion to become Roman citizens by serving for thirty years, made a habit of slipping into my wooden hut when I was teaching Lugunda and watching with their mouths open and repeating aloud the Latin words. Before I knew what was happening, I was teaching them both Latin and how to write.

s/t: The Memoirs of Minutus Launsus Manilianus, Who Has Won the Insignia. Ihmiskunnan viholliset The Roman (The Manilianus Duology Mika Waltari The Roman (original title Ihmiskunnan viholliset, which translates to Mankind's Enemies) is a fiction novel by Mika Waltari published in 1964. Set in Rome, the book is a sequel to The Secret of the Kingdom, a novel about the early days of Christianity. The protagonist and narrator is Minutus, the son of Marcus, the main character of the previous novel.

So I was taught the Stoic philosophy by an embittered Timaius who despised my Latin studies, since Romans in his opinion were barbarians, and bore a grudge against Rome, which had deprived Rhodes of its freedom. Among the youth of the city who took part in the equestrian games were ten or so who vied with each other at wild exploits.

She dressed carefully now, as befitted the wife of a Roman senator with legal rights of a mother of three children, and she wore far fewer jewels than before. My father took me by surprise

She dressed carefully now, as befitted the wife of a Roman senator with legal rights of a mother of three children, and she wore far fewer jewels than before. My father took me by surprise. He was much thinner and less breathless and moody than before I had gone to Britain.

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Waltari, Mika, 1908-1979. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Uploaded by CarriC on May 25, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The Roman epub download

ISBN13: 978-1568494869

ISBN: 1568494866

Author: Mika Toimi Waltari

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Buccaneer Books (June 1, 1994)

Pages: 572 pages

ePUB size: 1504 kb

FB2 size: 1706 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 197

Other Formats: mobi docx lit lrf

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Rleyistr
Mika Waltari (1908-1979) was an extremely productive writer and is probably the best-known Finnish novelist outside his homeland. The Roman, an English translation of Waltari's historical novel Ihmiskunnan Viholliset (The Enemies of Mankind) (1964), was the last novel Waltari published, and it reflects his pessimism about human nature and his ambivalence toward Christianity.

The protagonist, Minutus Lausus Manilianus, is a kind of upper-class Forrest Gump who wanders through the late-1st century Roman world getting to know everyone of importance, from Claudius, Agrippina, Nero, and Vespasian to Peter, Paul, Luke, and Simon Magus. Minutus even gets to name Lugundanum (London) after his Brittonic lover (505) and to bring Vespasian crucial intelligence from Jerusalem under siege.

Waltari knows his Tacitus and his New Testament; his historical references are mostly plausible (though Minutus's introduction of scented soap to Rome is a stretch) (160). But the outlandish happenstances of the novel that allow Minutus to both sympathize with Christians and to organize Nero's massacre of them strains to the breaking point a reader's willing suspension of disbelief.

In some places, Waltari seems to write with tongue placed firmly in cheek, as when he complains about Roman teenagers trying to study while a slave is "waving a sistrum or banging two copper saucepan lids against each other while a hoarse singer wails Egyptian street ballads." (546) Again, Waltari concludes the book with an anachronistic conflict between Christians who cannot agree whether in baptizing Minutus "the entire body should be submerged" or "a sprinkling on the head would suffice." (571)

To my taste, the novel is overlong and the character of Minutus unconvincing. It's certainly possible for an author to make his protagonist a lucky, rich, and unreflective dolt, but the reader somehow has to be made to care about the dolt's existence. I didn't make any sense of Minutus except as a vehicle by which to fictionalize 1st century Roman history.
Rleyistr
Mika Waltari (1908-1979) was an extremely productive writer and is probably the best-known Finnish novelist outside his homeland. The Roman, an English translation of Waltari's historical novel Ihmiskunnan Viholliset (The Enemies of Mankind) (1964), was the last novel Waltari published, and it reflects his pessimism about human nature and his ambivalence toward Christianity.

The protagonist, Minutus Lausus Manilianus, is a kind of upper-class Forrest Gump who wanders through the late-1st century Roman world getting to know everyone of importance, from Claudius, Agrippina, Nero, and Vespasian to Peter, Paul, Luke, and Simon Magus. Minutus even gets to name Lugundanum (London) after his Brittonic lover (505) and to bring Vespasian crucial intelligence from Jerusalem under siege.

Waltari knows his Tacitus and his New Testament; his historical references are mostly plausible (though Minutus's introduction of scented soap to Rome is a stretch) (160). But the outlandish happenstances of the novel that allow Minutus to both sympathize with Christians and to organize Nero's massacre of them strains to the breaking point a reader's willing suspension of disbelief.

In some places, Waltari seems to write with tongue placed firmly in cheek, as when he complains about Roman teenagers trying to study while a slave is "waving a sistrum or banging two copper saucepan lids against each other while a hoarse singer wails Egyptian street ballads." (546) Again, Waltari concludes the book with an anachronistic conflict between Christians who cannot agree whether in baptizing Minutus "the entire body should be submerged" or "a sprinkling on the head would suffice." (571)

To my taste, the novel is overlong and the character of Minutus unconvincing. It's certainly possible for an author to make his protagonist a lucky, rich, and unreflective dolt, but the reader somehow has to be made to care about the dolt's existence. I didn't make any sense of Minutus except as a vehicle by which to fictionalize 1st century Roman history.
Feri
I recieved the book in the time limit as advertised the book was and old library book with stamps form that library
it was permanently bent but the contents are just fine it is used but worn
Feri
I recieved the book in the time limit as advertised the book was and old library book with stamps form that library
it was permanently bent but the contents are just fine it is used but worn
Juce
I love Mika Waltari's historical novels, and "The Roman" was no exception. I also highly recommend "The Egyptian" and "The Etruscan" both of which take you back in time. The Roman takes you back to the time of Nero when Christians were thrown to the lions. The happenings in those novels corroborate history.
Juce
I love Mika Waltari's historical novels, and "The Roman" was no exception. I also highly recommend "The Egyptian" and "The Etruscan" both of which take you back in time. The Roman takes you back to the time of Nero when Christians were thrown to the lions. The happenings in those novels corroborate history.
Fearlesssinger
What is Mika Waltari up to in THE ROMAN? There is a very dry Finnish sense of humor at play here, exploiting the ironies of a narrator who is an utter moral vaccum, unable to perceive the truth of anything going on around him. Put such a cipher in the poisonous milieu of Poppaea, Agrippina, Tigellinus, et. al, and watch out! When our "hero" is charged by Nero with devising "entertainments" involving the torture and slaughter of Christians scapegoated for the great fire, his chief worry is that the jaded audience will grow bored. I suspect a lot of THE ROMAN is really about Waltari's take on the Nazis and perhaps Stalinist Russia, with all their bureaucratic double-talk covering the unspeakable ugliness of mass murder. One reviewer complains that THE ROMAN goes the route of QUO VADIS, with a pro-Christian slant, but I think the book is far more subtle, complex, and ambiguous than that. Beware of abridged editions (like the US paperback that was published in the 1960s). THE ROMAN is preceded by a novel about the narrator's father and his encounter with the early Christians, THE SECRET OF THE KINGDOM (which I have not read).
Fearlesssinger
What is Mika Waltari up to in THE ROMAN? There is a very dry Finnish sense of humor at play here, exploiting the ironies of a narrator who is an utter moral vaccum, unable to perceive the truth of anything going on around him. Put such a cipher in the poisonous milieu of Poppaea, Agrippina, Tigellinus, et. al, and watch out! When our "hero" is charged by Nero with devising "entertainments" involving the torture and slaughter of Christians scapegoated for the great fire, his chief worry is that the jaded audience will grow bored. I suspect a lot of THE ROMAN is really about Waltari's take on the Nazis and perhaps Stalinist Russia, with all their bureaucratic double-talk covering the unspeakable ugliness of mass murder. One reviewer complains that THE ROMAN goes the route of QUO VADIS, with a pro-Christian slant, but I think the book is far more subtle, complex, and ambiguous than that. Beware of abridged editions (like the US paperback that was published in the 1960s). THE ROMAN is preceded by a novel about the narrator's father and his encounter with the early Christians, THE SECRET OF THE KINGDOM (which I have not read).
Jesmi
I simply love Mika Waltari because he does not play partisan politics with his history. His criticisms are universal and his quest is the human soul in its journey of self discovery. He offers what one might term a sort of theologia poetica.
Jesmi
I simply love Mika Waltari because he does not play partisan politics with his history. His criticisms are universal and his quest is the human soul in its journey of self discovery. He offers what one might term a sort of theologia poetica.
Hra
We love the book!!! The "used touch" gives it even more value!!!
Hra
We love the book!!! The "used touch" gives it even more value!!!
Golkis
If you enjoy well researched historical novels, I would recommend this one to you. The fly on the wall is fictional character, Minutus, a friend of Nero's. What I enjoyed was getting to meet Nero, Seneca, St. Paul, and St. Peter and what it was like to see the Druids and the early Christians. Before I read this book I only knew 4 things about ancient Rome: that Nero fiddled while Rome burned, that the early Christians were thrown to the lions, that Nero's mother killed her husband so that Nero could become emperor, and that Nero had his male lover's genitals removed and then married him. This book put all those things in context for me. At times the reading was a bit slow and difficult to follow, but on the whole I found it an enjoyable and educational experience. Not as good as I remember "the Egyptian" being, but nevertheless very worthwhile.
Golkis
If you enjoy well researched historical novels, I would recommend this one to you. The fly on the wall is fictional character, Minutus, a friend of Nero's. What I enjoyed was getting to meet Nero, Seneca, St. Paul, and St. Peter and what it was like to see the Druids and the early Christians. Before I read this book I only knew 4 things about ancient Rome: that Nero fiddled while Rome burned, that the early Christians were thrown to the lions, that Nero's mother killed her husband so that Nero could become emperor, and that Nero had his male lover's genitals removed and then married him. This book put all those things in context for me. At times the reading was a bit slow and difficult to follow, but on the whole I found it an enjoyable and educational experience. Not as good as I remember "the Egyptian" being, but nevertheless very worthwhile.
One of the great historical novels Mika Wllteri has the ability of penetrating the boundaries of period Time, help you relive it by using the phrases words and type of thinking of that age, you actually find yourself immersed in the reality that you wish you could've experienced in real life, the Roman is a brief introduction into a stormy epoch In the Roman history one full of excitement and real people that you would've liked to have met.
One of the great historical novels Mika Wllteri has the ability of penetrating the boundaries of period Time, help you relive it by using the phrases words and type of thinking of that age, you actually find yourself immersed in the reality that you wish you could've experienced in real life, the Roman is a brief introduction into a stormy epoch In the Roman history one full of excitement and real people that you would've liked to have met.