» » Fears Unnamed

Fears Unnamed epub download

by Tim Lebbon


Charley had been out gathering sticks to dry for tinder ead twigs she found there

Charley had been out gathering sticks to dry for tinder ead twigs she found there. There were no signs, she said. No disturbances in the virgin surface of the snow, no tracks, no warning. Nothing to prepare her for the scene of bloody devastation she stumbled across. She had rounded a big boulder and seen the red splash in the snow, which was all that remained of a human being. The shock froze her comprehension. The reality of the scene.

Tim Lebbon - Fears Unnamed. For Daniel, my little mate. LEISURE BOOKS тАв February 2004 Published by. Dorchester Publishing C. Inc. 200 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10016. If you purchased this book without a cover you should be aware that this book is stolen property. It was reported as "unsold and destroyed" to the publisher and neither the author nor the publisher has received any payment for this "stripped book.

Город: A mystical village in WalesПодписчиков: 6 ты. себе: Horror and thriller writer

Город: A mystical village in WalesПодписчиков: 6 ты. себе: Horror and thriller writer. Author of The Silence (Netflix) and others. Lover of endurance sport, coffee, and cake. Hair never suited me.

Tim Lebbon has burst upon the scene and established himself as one of the best horror writers at work today. A collection of four chilling novellas, two of which are British Fantasy Award winners and one original.

The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

In March 2017, the producers of Godzilla transport audiences to the birthplace of one of the most powerful monster myths of all in KONG: SKULL ISLAND, from Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Tim Lebbon lives in South Wales with his wife and two children. His books include "Face, The Nature of Balance, Changing of Faces, Exorcising Angels" (with Simon Clark)," Dead Man's Hand, Pieces of Hate, Fears Unnamed, White and Other Tales of Ruin, Desolation," and "Berserk," Future publications include "Hellboy: Unnatural Selection" from Simon & Schuster, plus books from Cemetery Dance, Night Shade Books, and Necessary Evil Press, among others

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. No need to use torrent or IRC.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. In March 2017, the producers of Godzilla transport audiences to the birthplace of one of the most powerful monster myths of all in KONG: SKULL ISLAND, from Warner Bros.

Download books for free. Tim Lebbon - Fears Unnamed.

by. Lebbon, Tim. Publication date. New York : Leisure Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on July 2, 2015.

Four chilling novellas of the macabre by the Bram Stoker Award-winning author of Face and The Nature of Balance includes two British Fantasy Award-winning tales, as well as an original work that has never previously been published. Original.

Fears Unnamed epub download

ISBN13: 978-0843952001

ISBN: 0843952008

Author: Tim Lebbon

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Leisure Books; Reissue edition (February 1, 2004)

Pages: 337 pages

ePUB size: 1922 kb

FB2 size: 1691 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 851

Other Formats: lit txt mbr docx

Related to Fears Unnamed ePub books

Kale
This was my first ever Lebbon, and I can safely say I'm a fan now. The four novellas in this book are extremely entertaining, well written, and imaginative. Lebbon has a handle on the horror genre that I've not seen in a while. It's a nice mix of character and atmosphere. I actaully cared about the people in these stories.

The first story starts out well, then, for me, becomes too comic bookish. The book jacket says he wrote a new story for the collection and I'm gonna say this was it. It just seemed out of place with the others. It wasn't that it was bad, it just wasn't up to par with the rest. It should have gone in the middle of the book, because it made me dubious about what was to follow.

But the second story, about a group of people trapped in a house amidst a wolrdwide plague of death and evil ghosts was pure classic horror. Imagine a zombie story where the undead are trying to break into a house, except replace zombies with ghosts that mutilate you. This was my favorite story in the book, and could easily be made into a film. It was great.

The third was a bit more psychological, about a man who makes a deal to be brought back to life. Once alive, he must appease his benefactors or suffer the consequences. It was very dark, and didn't submit itself to cliches. Again, a great story.

The last story was in fact a classic zombie tale, but again, it was very dark and, while using some cliches, managed to be more about the family involved rather than the undead. There were some nice stressful scenes. It was actually very touching, and ended beautifully.

I can't recommend Lebbon enough at this point. If it wasn't for the first story being a bit off kilter, I'd give this collection a 5. Great stuff.
Kale
This was my first ever Lebbon, and I can safely say I'm a fan now. The four novellas in this book are extremely entertaining, well written, and imaginative. Lebbon has a handle on the horror genre that I've not seen in a while. It's a nice mix of character and atmosphere. I actaully cared about the people in these stories.

The first story starts out well, then, for me, becomes too comic bookish. The book jacket says he wrote a new story for the collection and I'm gonna say this was it. It just seemed out of place with the others. It wasn't that it was bad, it just wasn't up to par with the rest. It should have gone in the middle of the book, because it made me dubious about what was to follow.

But the second story, about a group of people trapped in a house amidst a wolrdwide plague of death and evil ghosts was pure classic horror. Imagine a zombie story where the undead are trying to break into a house, except replace zombies with ghosts that mutilate you. This was my favorite story in the book, and could easily be made into a film. It was great.

The third was a bit more psychological, about a man who makes a deal to be brought back to life. Once alive, he must appease his benefactors or suffer the consequences. It was very dark, and didn't submit itself to cliches. Again, a great story.

The last story was in fact a classic zombie tale, but again, it was very dark and, while using some cliches, managed to be more about the family involved rather than the undead. There were some nice stressful scenes. It was actually very touching, and ended beautifully.

I can't recommend Lebbon enough at this point. If it wasn't for the first story being a bit off kilter, I'd give this collection a 5. Great stuff.
Chuynopana
not by whatever light I could attempt to throw upon it. I may as well have had my eyes closed" (p. 131) - themes of loss exuding a sense of how small and vulnerable man can be in the greater scheme of things. The present collection contains four novellas of dark fantasy/horror, written in focused, succint language with compact imagery here and there, using first person narrative for the initial two installments – "High overhead pigeons took flight, their wings sounding like a pack of cards being thumbed. Game of luck [indented]" p. 211.

'Remnants' (2004 pp. 1-63, 3 stars): the exploration of a subterranean city of the dead (of "wronged lives ripped away by unfairness at best, evil at worst" p. 60) somewhere in the Ethiopian desert serves as a background for the reunion of two friends. The ending of this melancholic piece is open to various interpretations: the extinguishment of corporeal life (i.e. the long fall in the cave) while individual consciousness continues its journey towards light in some intermediate state – "Time has ghosts…That's what time is: the ghost of every instant passed, haunting the potential of every moment to come" (pp. 14-5).

'White' (1999 pp. 64-156, 4 stars): this stylish apocalyptic story is about a group of relative strangers trapped in an old manor on the frozen coast of Cornwall, isolated by heavy snowfall of what appears to be a nuclear winter while civilization is rapidly melting down like dirty reactors. Their isolation and panic are further compounded by the gruesome assault of elusive entities ("shadows flowing through shadows" p. 118). Tension filled action combines elements of survival horror with an underlying enviromentalist message, but perhaps it can also be read as a metaphor for the extent disintegrating effects of haunting memories, unresolved conflicts of the past, as well as suppressed desires (reflected back by the unknown with maliciously manipulative intent) can be – in some oblique respect one may search for parallels in Stanislaw Lem's classic "Solaris" (1961).

'The Unfortunate' (2001 - first published in As the Sun Goes Down; pp. 157-246, 3.5 stars) – paranoia, insecurity and disorientation permeate the novella that deals with what price a husband/father has to pay for being saved by supernatural forces coming to his aid in a plane crash.

'Naming of Parts' (2000 pp. 247-337, 5 stars): a tiny gem of tragic coming-of-age story set against the backdrop of the walking dead and dying landscape ("harvest of grief" p. 282) in the British countryside – "Dead things everywhere with one thing in mind - to keep moving. To find life…maybe the bugs that make things rot are dead as well" (p. 314).
The present novella and its sequels, 'Changing of Faces' and 'Shifting of Veils', were published together in Borrowed Time [PB] (2015).
Chuynopana
not by whatever light I could attempt to throw upon it. I may as well have had my eyes closed" (p. 131) - themes of loss exuding a sense of how small and vulnerable man can be in the greater scheme of things. The present collection contains four novellas of dark fantasy/horror, written in focused, succint language with compact imagery here and there, using first person narrative for the initial two installments – "High overhead pigeons took flight, their wings sounding like a pack of cards being thumbed. Game of luck [indented]" p. 211.

'Remnants' (2004 pp. 1-63, 3 stars): the exploration of a subterranean city of the dead (of "wronged lives ripped away by unfairness at best, evil at worst" p. 60) somewhere in the Ethiopian desert serves as a background for the reunion of two friends. The ending of this melancholic piece is open to various interpretations: the extinguishment of corporeal life (i.e. the long fall in the cave) while individual consciousness continues its journey towards light in some intermediate state – "Time has ghosts…That's what time is: the ghost of every instant passed, haunting the potential of every moment to come" (pp. 14-5).

'White' (1999 pp. 64-156, 4 stars): this stylish apocalyptic story is about a group of relative strangers trapped in an old manor on the frozen coast of Cornwall, isolated by heavy snowfall of what appears to be a nuclear winter while civilization is rapidly melting down like dirty reactors. Their isolation and panic are further compounded by the gruesome assault of elusive entities ("shadows flowing through shadows" p. 118). Tension filled action combines elements of survival horror with an underlying enviromentalist message, but perhaps it can also be read as a metaphor for the extent disintegrating effects of haunting memories, unresolved conflicts of the past, as well as suppressed desires (reflected back by the unknown with maliciously manipulative intent) can be – in some oblique respect one may search for parallels in Stanislaw Lem's classic "Solaris" (1961).

'The Unfortunate' (2001 - first published in As the Sun Goes Down; pp. 157-246, 3.5 stars) – paranoia, insecurity and disorientation permeate the novella that deals with what price a husband/father has to pay for being saved by supernatural forces coming to his aid in a plane crash.

'Naming of Parts' (2000 pp. 247-337, 5 stars): a tiny gem of tragic coming-of-age story set against the backdrop of the walking dead and dying landscape ("harvest of grief" p. 282) in the British countryside – "Dead things everywhere with one thing in mind - to keep moving. To find life…maybe the bugs that make things rot are dead as well" (p. 314).
The present novella and its sequels, 'Changing of Faces' and 'Shifting of Veils', were published together in Borrowed Time [PB] (2015).
Mikale
A book like "Fears Unnamed" was a real treat for me, an avid lover of apocalyptic tales. I must have read over a hundred horror novels in my lifetime and when I'm asked which were my favourites I'm always coming back to books like "Swan Song", "The Stand", "I am Legend". Whether it be sci-fi or horror, I find that end-of-the-world stories always seem to breed the most imaginative concepts from the best authors out there. Tim Lebbon in particular has a reputation as a writer of such apocalyptic tales and in "Fears Unnamed" he presents to us 4 short novels with end-of-the-world scenarios.

The first story, "Remnants" is about an archaeologist and his childhood pal who travel in an isolated part of Africa and discover an underground "City of the dead". The archaeologist is obsessed with the idea of locating his dead son but before, he must wade his way through all of the horrors that lurk in this seemingly interminable underground hell. A great opener, although I wish Lebbon had developed his idea more fully and had more of the story take place in the city of the dead. Still, I loved the philosophical paintings throughout the story about growing up without selling out your values and living life to the fullest. I give Remnants a 4/5.

In "White", six young vacationing adults find themselves trapped in their cabin due to a seemingly unending snow-storm. The nearest village is ten miles away and walking that distance in the storm seems unfathomable but staying in the cabin could be worse as there are murderous white "shapes" outside, trying to make their way onto the cabin and feast on them. Lebbon really hits his stride here delivering a story that is creepy, claustrophobic and very suspenseful. As a Canadian to whom 3 feet of snow is often a reality, this one really hit home for me. White gets a 4/5.

In "The Unfortunate", a man escapes death when he is the sole survivor of a plane crash. But soon he will discover that escaping death has a huge price as family and friends close to him start dying and getting into horrible accidents. The weakest of the 4 tales, "The Unfortunate" is written in a highly experimental and should I say it, pretentious writing style. I almost quit on it 10 pages in, but it those get better. Still, there is something eerily familiar about it (Final Destination anyone?). This story I would rate a 3/5.

The last story, "Naming of parts" is the best one. In a world gone mad, a boy and his parents set off on an adventure to locate Mandy, their teenaged girl who ran away a few weeks ago. Much of the population (including the animals) has been infested with a strange disease that is making them kill and eat the remains of everything they come in contact with. This tale was an absolute blast, a gory and fun ride. Fans of Brian Keene's "The Rising" especially will get a kick out of this. This one is a definite 5/5.

Overall a fine collection that I recommend to all horror fans. While some stories are better than others and there are a few rough patches here and there there is no doubt that Lebbon has what it takes to be a major force in horror literature for years to come.
Mikale
A book like "Fears Unnamed" was a real treat for me, an avid lover of apocalyptic tales. I must have read over a hundred horror novels in my lifetime and when I'm asked which were my favourites I'm always coming back to books like "Swan Song", "The Stand", "I am Legend". Whether it be sci-fi or horror, I find that end-of-the-world stories always seem to breed the most imaginative concepts from the best authors out there. Tim Lebbon in particular has a reputation as a writer of such apocalyptic tales and in "Fears Unnamed" he presents to us 4 short novels with end-of-the-world scenarios.

The first story, "Remnants" is about an archaeologist and his childhood pal who travel in an isolated part of Africa and discover an underground "City of the dead". The archaeologist is obsessed with the idea of locating his dead son but before, he must wade his way through all of the horrors that lurk in this seemingly interminable underground hell. A great opener, although I wish Lebbon had developed his idea more fully and had more of the story take place in the city of the dead. Still, I loved the philosophical paintings throughout the story about growing up without selling out your values and living life to the fullest. I give Remnants a 4/5.

In "White", six young vacationing adults find themselves trapped in their cabin due to a seemingly unending snow-storm. The nearest village is ten miles away and walking that distance in the storm seems unfathomable but staying in the cabin could be worse as there are murderous white "shapes" outside, trying to make their way onto the cabin and feast on them. Lebbon really hits his stride here delivering a story that is creepy, claustrophobic and very suspenseful. As a Canadian to whom 3 feet of snow is often a reality, this one really hit home for me. White gets a 4/5.

In "The Unfortunate", a man escapes death when he is the sole survivor of a plane crash. But soon he will discover that escaping death has a huge price as family and friends close to him start dying and getting into horrible accidents. The weakest of the 4 tales, "The Unfortunate" is written in a highly experimental and should I say it, pretentious writing style. I almost quit on it 10 pages in, but it those get better. Still, there is something eerily familiar about it (Final Destination anyone?). This story I would rate a 3/5.

The last story, "Naming of parts" is the best one. In a world gone mad, a boy and his parents set off on an adventure to locate Mandy, their teenaged girl who ran away a few weeks ago. Much of the population (including the animals) has been infested with a strange disease that is making them kill and eat the remains of everything they come in contact with. This tale was an absolute blast, a gory and fun ride. Fans of Brian Keene's "The Rising" especially will get a kick out of this. This one is a definite 5/5.

Overall a fine collection that I recommend to all horror fans. While some stories are better than others and there are a few rough patches here and there there is no doubt that Lebbon has what it takes to be a major force in horror literature for years to come.