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Home Philip K. The transmigration of t. .The Transmigration of Timothy Archer, . Part of VALIS Trilogy series by Philip K. Dick. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23. Table of Contents. For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book

The Transmigration of Timothy Archer is a 1982 novel by American writer Philip K. As his final work, the book was published shortly after his death in March 1982, although it was written the previous year.

The Transmigration of Timothy Archer is a 1982 novel by American writer Philip K. The book was originally titled Bishop Timothy Archer. The novel was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel in 1982

Ultimately, however, I couldn't quite swallow the whole book (oh me of little faith). I'm not sure if it was a dissatisfaction with it not living up to my No single thing abides; and all things are fucked up. ― Philip K. Dick, The Transmigration of Timothy Archer

The novel follows Bishop Timothy Archer as he travels to Israel, ostensibly to examine ancient scrolls bearing the words of Christ. But, more importantly, this leads him to examine the decisions he made during his life and how they may have contributed to the suicide of his mistress and son. This introspective book is one of Dick’s most philosophical and literary, delving into the mysteries of religion and of faith itself.

The novel follows Bishop Timothy Archer as he travels to Israel, ostensibly to examine ancient scrolls bearing the words of Christ. The novel follows Bishop Timothy Archer as he travels to Israel, ostensibly to examine ancient scrolls bearing the words of Christ. This introspective book is one of Dick’s most philosophical and literary, delving into the mysteries of religion and of faith itself.

This was Timothy Archer the lawyer. '-since it is by faith and through Jesus that we have entered this state of grace in which we can boast about looking forward to God's glory. Lets's se. He ran his fingers down the page, his lips moving. 'If it is certain that through one man's fall so many died, it is even more certain that divine grace, coming through the one man, Jesus Christ, came to so many as an abundant free gift. He looked further on, turning pages.

The book was originally titled Bishop Timothy Archer. The VALIS trilogy is a set of science l novels by author Philip K. Dick which include VALIS (1978), The Divine Invasion (1980), and The Transmigration of Timothy Archer (1982). Dick's first novel about the VALIS concept originally titled "VALISystem A", was published as Radio Free Albemuth after Dick's death in 1982. Ishmael is a fictional character in Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851). Ishmael, the only surviving crewmember of the Pequod, is the narrator of the book.

Also by philip k. VALIS The Divine Invasion. 1st Vintage Books ed. p. cm. ISBN 0-679-73444-9 I. Title. Published in the United States by Vintage Books, a division ofRandom House, In. New York, and distributed in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto. 54-dc20 90-55675 CIP.

Bishop Timothy Archer, formerly a lawyer, searches for God by means of mysticism, seances, and a quest for the source of records--written earlier than the Bible--of Christ's life on earth

The Transmigration of Timothy Archer epub download

ISBN13: 978-0671440664

ISBN: 0671440667

Author: Philip K. Dick

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Simon & Schuster (May 1, 1982)

Pages: 255 pages

ePUB size: 1891 kb

FB2 size: 1506 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 810

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Related to The Transmigration of Timothy Archer ePub books

Usanner
One of my all-time favorite PKD novels. This is one of those books that gets more rich and rewarding with every re-read--a true mark of a classic masterpiece, in my experience.

The first time I read it, many years ago, it struck me as only slightly interesting; the second time, a year or so, it impressed me a lot better, but still seemed almost boring compared to Dick's other, more well-known, far-out sci-fi masterpieces; and now, having read it a third time all the way through, I am certain it is Dick's most mature novel, and a wonderful "swan song" of sorts from him. True, it may lack the sci-fi far-out-ness of many of his other works--in a lot of ways, it is just a great novel in the classic "novel" sense, and one of his least "sci-fi" books--but he really makes the characters come alive, especially Angel Archer, the narrator. He himself had told how he felt like he was actually WITH the character, while writing her, and was deeply grieved to be finished with her, when he finished this book. (I thought that was touching and nice, when I read that, but this time around, reading this book through, I know exactly what he meant; I too felt her company and presence, and now that I've finished reading it again, I too miss her ongoing presence, which reading this book gives you. She is truly an exceptional character... and "she's smarter than I am," Dick had claimed!

This book contains PKD's most mature, actual WRITING-skills. Many readers have observed that, while his ideas have often been first-rate and amazing, his actual prose-style has often seemed rushed, plain, or mediocre. That is definitely not true of this book! His characters come alive, his descriptions and details are simply amazingly articulate and well-written.
Usanner
One of my all-time favorite PKD novels. This is one of those books that gets more rich and rewarding with every re-read--a true mark of a classic masterpiece, in my experience.

The first time I read it, many years ago, it struck me as only slightly interesting; the second time, a year or so, it impressed me a lot better, but still seemed almost boring compared to Dick's other, more well-known, far-out sci-fi masterpieces; and now, having read it a third time all the way through, I am certain it is Dick's most mature novel, and a wonderful "swan song" of sorts from him. True, it may lack the sci-fi far-out-ness of many of his other works--in a lot of ways, it is just a great novel in the classic "novel" sense, and one of his least "sci-fi" books--but he really makes the characters come alive, especially Angel Archer, the narrator. He himself had told how he felt like he was actually WITH the character, while writing her, and was deeply grieved to be finished with her, when he finished this book. (I thought that was touching and nice, when I read that, but this time around, reading this book through, I know exactly what he meant; I too felt her company and presence, and now that I've finished reading it again, I too miss her ongoing presence, which reading this book gives you. She is truly an exceptional character... and "she's smarter than I am," Dick had claimed!

This book contains PKD's most mature, actual WRITING-skills. Many readers have observed that, while his ideas have often been first-rate and amazing, his actual prose-style has often seemed rushed, plain, or mediocre. That is definitely not true of this book! His characters come alive, his descriptions and details are simply amazingly articulate and well-written.
Froststalker
This book reads weirdly when you have a friend that calls himself a bishop who also went looking for the Jesus shroom.
It's a really nice take on the ailments of the mind and how it tries to make sense of the world.
Froststalker
This book reads weirdly when you have a friend that calls himself a bishop who also went looking for the Jesus shroom.
It's a really nice take on the ailments of the mind and how it tries to make sense of the world.
Dynen
PKD at his best: The story of renaissance man Tim Archer, ex-lawyer, ex-alcoholic, current Episcopalian Bishop and Civil Rights activists' leader, seeker of the true religion, occultist. The story of his personal tragedies, eventual downfall, and - transmigration - is taking place mainly in Northern California and is narrated by Angel Archer, his daughter in law, or rather, as a consequence of the events unfolding, the widow of his son. Angel is depressed about the suicide of her husband, her best friend who was also Tim Archer's lover, and the accidental (is there really anything accidental, random in a PKD novel?) death of Bishop Tim Archer in the Israeli desert. Still, she is fascinated and moved by what she experienced (believed to have experienced?), and that fascination rubs of on the reader: I read this 250 page novel in only two settings.
What makes PKD (Philip K. Dick) such a fantastic writer, in my eyes, is his ability to transport his unusual ideas about the very vague substance of reality in such a casual way; There is no dry lecture about the constructivist nature of reality, weighted with dry philosophical terms and sentences with unnecessarily complicated grammar. Instead, one reads a dinner conversation which within a few sentences drifts from small talk about the menu to philosophy of the mind, the occult, and back to the food on the table. There is no dumbing down of ideas or insights, in contrast, the fact that PKD's ideas are articulated by different people at different times makes it harder to figure out what he really means. But the fact that these ideas are packed into an extremely well written novel featuring characters, whom somewhat alternatively minded contemporaries can probably relate to, predigests them nicely. At the end of the book one ends up not only understanding how PKD thinks that "real" is a very relative term, and how he speculates that information can travel between minds in ways unbeknown to modern man; one also understands how it must FEEL to be subjected to bouts of reality dissolution. These are the things he brilliantly accomplishes to communicate in "The Transmigration of Timothy Archer".
Dynen
PKD at his best: The story of renaissance man Tim Archer, ex-lawyer, ex-alcoholic, current Episcopalian Bishop and Civil Rights activists' leader, seeker of the true religion, occultist. The story of his personal tragedies, eventual downfall, and - transmigration - is taking place mainly in Northern California and is narrated by Angel Archer, his daughter in law, or rather, as a consequence of the events unfolding, the widow of his son. Angel is depressed about the suicide of her husband, her best friend who was also Tim Archer's lover, and the accidental (is there really anything accidental, random in a PKD novel?) death of Bishop Tim Archer in the Israeli desert. Still, she is fascinated and moved by what she experienced (believed to have experienced?), and that fascination rubs of on the reader: I read this 250 page novel in only two settings.
What makes PKD (Philip K. Dick) such a fantastic writer, in my eyes, is his ability to transport his unusual ideas about the very vague substance of reality in such a casual way; There is no dry lecture about the constructivist nature of reality, weighted with dry philosophical terms and sentences with unnecessarily complicated grammar. Instead, one reads a dinner conversation which within a few sentences drifts from small talk about the menu to philosophy of the mind, the occult, and back to the food on the table. There is no dumbing down of ideas or insights, in contrast, the fact that PKD's ideas are articulated by different people at different times makes it harder to figure out what he really means. But the fact that these ideas are packed into an extremely well written novel featuring characters, whom somewhat alternatively minded contemporaries can probably relate to, predigests them nicely. At the end of the book one ends up not only understanding how PKD thinks that "real" is a very relative term, and how he speculates that information can travel between minds in ways unbeknown to modern man; one also understands how it must FEEL to be subjected to bouts of reality dissolution. These are the things he brilliantly accomplishes to communicate in "The Transmigration of Timothy Archer".
Vetitc
Definitely a Top-5 PKD story. The master of consensus reality strikes again. Echoes, or is echoed by, Sheldon Kopp's If You Meet the Buddha on the Road, Kill Him.

Just come for the sandwiches.
Vetitc
Definitely a Top-5 PKD story. The master of consensus reality strikes again. Echoes, or is echoed by, Sheldon Kopp's If You Meet the Buddha on the Road, Kill Him.

Just come for the sandwiches.
Brick my own
Classic PKD, can't beat it
Brick my own
Classic PKD, can't beat it
Walianirv
The VALIS trilogy, of which this book is the "conclusion", is definitely one of my favorites, because the author, PKD, introduces such mind-bending concepts. If you have read the previous two books in this trilogy, you would already be expecting to go through half of the book without any obvious connection to the other two, and this book is no exception. It is very strange, and very interesting. It is classic Philip K. Dick. Each book stands well alone, but I would recommend all three of them. Valis and The Divine Invasion: A Novel are the other two books.
Walianirv
The VALIS trilogy, of which this book is the "conclusion", is definitely one of my favorites, because the author, PKD, introduces such mind-bending concepts. If you have read the previous two books in this trilogy, you would already be expecting to go through half of the book without any obvious connection to the other two, and this book is no exception. It is very strange, and very interesting. It is classic Philip K. Dick. Each book stands well alone, but I would recommend all three of them. Valis and The Divine Invasion: A Novel are the other two books.
The Rollers of Vildar
--So 'believably written'--outlandish/stimulating ideas anchored in literate articulate but fallible-foibled characters who jump off the page with roman-a-clef warmbloodedness, this was PKD's 1st book to not bother me: the 'Sci-fi' angle and cutely-named characters in previous attempted reads proved 'soft-off'ers, but this! -One of the best novels I've ever read...prescient, compassionate, unpredictable, rich! --The poor genius! who like Kerouac must be guffawing major-league en el otro lado...
The Rollers of Vildar
--So 'believably written'--outlandish/stimulating ideas anchored in literate articulate but fallible-foibled characters who jump off the page with roman-a-clef warmbloodedness, this was PKD's 1st book to not bother me: the 'Sci-fi' angle and cutely-named characters in previous attempted reads proved 'soft-off'ers, but this! -One of the best novels I've ever read...prescient, compassionate, unpredictable, rich! --The poor genius! who like Kerouac must be guffawing major-league en el otro lado...
The apotheosis of Dick's madness and religious views, marvelous and suave.
The apotheosis of Dick's madness and religious views, marvelous and suave.