» » Clickers

Clickers epub download

by Mark Williams,J.F. Gonzalez


FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. But when hundreds of creatures pour out of the ocean and attack.

4 primary works, 4 total works. Phillipsport, Maine is . ore.

Published by Midnight Library at Smashwords. Thanks and acknowledgment must be given to Craig Spector, Matthew J. Pallamary, Cathy J. Gonzalez and the late Mike Baker for their encouragement and keen feedback on the first draft of this novel.

Mark Williams (1959 - 1998) was a multi-talented artist whose work . Ultimately, I dug this book overall, but I did have a few qualms about the story.

Mark Williams (1959 - 1998) was a multi-talented artist whose work spanned film and comics. As a special effects artist, his work has graced the films of James Cameron (The Abyss, Aliens, Terminator 2) and David Cronenberg (The Fly) and most was most recently seen in Shrieker and Curse of the Puppetmaster (1998, Full Moon Productions). Gonzalez and co-written with Mark Williams, is a fun B-movie style creature feature.

Libra Nigrum Scienta Secreta (The Black Book of Secret Knowledge) (with Brian Keene) (2015) Arcane Wisdom (Limited release).

Born in Inglewood, CA, Jesus Gonzalez was raised in the nearby suburb of Gardena. Following graduation from high school, in 1982, he attended college, and then dropped in and out for the next several years before quitting for good in 1986. Libra Nigrum Scienta Secreta (The Black Book of Secret Knowledge) (with Brian Keene) (2015) Arcane Wisdom (Limited release).

Download books for free. J F Gonzalez, Mark Williams. Download (pdf, . 0 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free.

Universidad de Puerto Rico Recinto de Mayaguez.

But these monsters aren’t merely here to ravage and pillage. They are being driven onto land by fear. Something ancient and without mercy.

When thousands of giant crab-scorpion creatures invade a quiet Maine town, all hell breaks loose

When thousands of giant crab-scorpion creatures invade a quiet Maine town, all hell breaks loose. Novelist Rick Sychek joins the residents of Phillipsport, Maine to fight the creatures and save the town.

IN A PEACEFUL NEW ENGLAND VILLAGE, TERROR LIES LURKING BENEATH THE SURFACE... Phillipsport, Maine seems to be the perfect place for novelist Rick Sychek to settle in to. A small seaport village, it is quaint and peaceful, just what Rick needs in order to write his next novel. On his drive into town Rick runs over what appears to be a large crab in the road. About the size of a common house cat and sporting a segmented tail that resembles the stinger of a scorpion, it is unlike any crustacean he or anybody else in town has seen before. Within the next day the town is literally besieged by hundreds of the creatures -- which Rick calls Clickers due to the sound their claws make as the click together -- as they ravage and plunder anything unlucky enough to get in their way. NOW THE WAVE OF TERROR BEGINS... Hundreds of Clickers literally beach themselves in a wave of terror that ends in horror and death for some....but it brings the town together collectively in a fight to drive the creatures back. Rick joins his new friends in fighting the creatures off only to discover that the Clickers aren't merely here to ravage and pillage. They are being driven up on the shores of this New England by instinct. For something is hunting the Clickers. Something far worse than any of them could ever imagine...

Clickers epub download

ISBN13: 978-0759900141

ISBN: 0759900140

Author: Mark Williams,J.F. Gonzalez

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Genre Fiction

Language: English

Publisher: Hard Shell Word Factory (May 1, 2005)

Pages: 268 pages

ePUB size: 1495 kb

FB2 size: 1678 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 723

Other Formats: azw docx doc rtf

Related to Clickers ePub books

Gagas
Killer. Crabs. What more do I need to say?

Clickers, the first novel by J.F. Gonzalez and co-written with Mark Williams, is a fun B-movie style creature feature. It's high on entertainment and gore, making it a breezy read and, despite the story's October setting, it's a terrific summer beach read (unless you see some crabs...).

Ultimately, I dug this book overall, but I did have a few qualms about the story. The characters are paper-thin, and our lead protag, horror author Rick, is about a boring as they come. That he is a long-haired horror writer is the extent of depth the authors can muster, which is not exactly the most compelling stuff in the world. The writing is decent, but could have been improved a fair deal with some better editing. There's a lot of repetition throughout: in one instance, I caught five instances of "again" in the span of two paragraphs. In one sentence, Rick stood and stood on the tips of his toes. Several characters are "zapped" of energy or motivation in multiple instances. According to the intro by Gonzalez, this version is editorially an improvement over past editions from other publishers, so I guess I'll count my blessings that I bought this Deadite Press re-issue instead of one of those earlier copies.

Clickers also has its fair share of cliches. Take, for instance, the horror writer trapped in a "real-life" horror story, the small-town hick deputy sheriff who makes Barney Fife look like a Mensa member, and the old doctor with all the answers. I actually liked this latter character, though, and he provides some neat-o exposition. The rest are pretty poorly drawn stock characters, but I get that the authors were going for that B-movie vibe. It's the monsters that are the most important part here, and the humans are secondary at best. This is a bit of a shame, though, as once the carnage gets going, there isn't really any reason to care for the losses.

So, yeah, there's a lot of First Novel Flaws, but, frankly, Clickers gets by on sheer chutzpah and I can forgive a fair amount if I'm at least entertained. And holy crap, was I ever entertained. The gore-to-page count ratio is pretty satisfying, and I loved the hell out of the killer crab concept. I'm a sucker for these 'terror from the deep' kind of horrors, and Gonzalez and Williams deliver on that front in spades. I had fun with this book, so much so that I finished Clickers last night and started Clickers II: The Next Wave this morning.
Gagas
Killer. Crabs. What more do I need to say?

Clickers, the first novel by J.F. Gonzalez and co-written with Mark Williams, is a fun B-movie style creature feature. It's high on entertainment and gore, making it a breezy read and, despite the story's October setting, it's a terrific summer beach read (unless you see some crabs...).

Ultimately, I dug this book overall, but I did have a few qualms about the story. The characters are paper-thin, and our lead protag, horror author Rick, is about a boring as they come. That he is a long-haired horror writer is the extent of depth the authors can muster, which is not exactly the most compelling stuff in the world. The writing is decent, but could have been improved a fair deal with some better editing. There's a lot of repetition throughout: in one instance, I caught five instances of "again" in the span of two paragraphs. In one sentence, Rick stood and stood on the tips of his toes. Several characters are "zapped" of energy or motivation in multiple instances. According to the intro by Gonzalez, this version is editorially an improvement over past editions from other publishers, so I guess I'll count my blessings that I bought this Deadite Press re-issue instead of one of those earlier copies.

Clickers also has its fair share of cliches. Take, for instance, the horror writer trapped in a "real-life" horror story, the small-town hick deputy sheriff who makes Barney Fife look like a Mensa member, and the old doctor with all the answers. I actually liked this latter character, though, and he provides some neat-o exposition. The rest are pretty poorly drawn stock characters, but I get that the authors were going for that B-movie vibe. It's the monsters that are the most important part here, and the humans are secondary at best. This is a bit of a shame, though, as once the carnage gets going, there isn't really any reason to care for the losses.

So, yeah, there's a lot of First Novel Flaws, but, frankly, Clickers gets by on sheer chutzpah and I can forgive a fair amount if I'm at least entertained. And holy crap, was I ever entertained. The gore-to-page count ratio is pretty satisfying, and I loved the hell out of the killer crab concept. I'm a sucker for these 'terror from the deep' kind of horrors, and Gonzalez and Williams deliver on that front in spades. I had fun with this book, so much so that I finished Clickers last night and started Clickers II: The Next Wave this morning.
Reggy
I met J.F. Gonzalez once at a book signing and much to my chagrin he passed away before we could get to know each other better. Since then I've read a great deal about what a generous friend and loving father and husband he was. The bittersweet legacy of the artist, of course, is that their work lives on beyond them, an immutable testament to the person they were.

I guess that's a bit of a heavy way to start a review of a pulp novel. But I can't pretend I wasn't going into this without a bit of melancholy. That being said, this is a pulp novel. What's more, I think it's a B-movie in novel form. CLICKERS runs through the paces of the sort of Universal and non-name studio black-and-white '50s sci-fi schlock you might have hunkered down to watch on a Saturday afternoon before you got cable. (Doubtless I'm dating myself with that sort of reference, but even those of you who grew up with Netflix can probably get the gist of what I mean.)

CLICKERS was written in 1999 and it carries a few telltale signs of its age: Blockbuster Video references and the like abound. But mostly the tale's timestamp lends credence to why, as is customary with horror stories, the main characters couldn't just call in help. It was the '90s, it was an isolated resort town, there was a storm, and they couldn't just call for help.

CLICKERS kicks off tremendously with the invasion of the titular crab-scorpion-lobster hybrids. Gonzalez and Williams gradually ratchet up the tension, turning the concept of freaky giant crabs into a singularly credible threat. All the beats of "The Blob" and its ilk are here - people are confused by the threat, deny it at first, and only finally face it when its become an existential threat.

And then...(spoiler alert, I guess)...then they sort of abandon that conceit entirely. It turns out the clickers had really been running from something, a new threat which, in narrative terms, I found to be a major letdown compared to the clickers. There's still a lot of tension and a number of pulse-pounding set pieces in the back half of the book, but I just feel like Gonzalez and Williams traded down instead of up in terms of the threat. But, ah well, it wasn't a book-ruining experience, and there are two Clickers sequels to check out so I'm sure I wasn't the only one calling for more of the gruesome, venomous crustaceans. Definitely check it out if your'e a fan of horror or old-timey B-movies.
Reggy
I met J.F. Gonzalez once at a book signing and much to my chagrin he passed away before we could get to know each other better. Since then I've read a great deal about what a generous friend and loving father and husband he was. The bittersweet legacy of the artist, of course, is that their work lives on beyond them, an immutable testament to the person they were.

I guess that's a bit of a heavy way to start a review of a pulp novel. But I can't pretend I wasn't going into this without a bit of melancholy. That being said, this is a pulp novel. What's more, I think it's a B-movie in novel form. CLICKERS runs through the paces of the sort of Universal and non-name studio black-and-white '50s sci-fi schlock you might have hunkered down to watch on a Saturday afternoon before you got cable. (Doubtless I'm dating myself with that sort of reference, but even those of you who grew up with Netflix can probably get the gist of what I mean.)

CLICKERS was written in 1999 and it carries a few telltale signs of its age: Blockbuster Video references and the like abound. But mostly the tale's timestamp lends credence to why, as is customary with horror stories, the main characters couldn't just call in help. It was the '90s, it was an isolated resort town, there was a storm, and they couldn't just call for help.

CLICKERS kicks off tremendously with the invasion of the titular crab-scorpion-lobster hybrids. Gonzalez and Williams gradually ratchet up the tension, turning the concept of freaky giant crabs into a singularly credible threat. All the beats of "The Blob" and its ilk are here - people are confused by the threat, deny it at first, and only finally face it when its become an existential threat.

And then...(spoiler alert, I guess)...then they sort of abandon that conceit entirely. It turns out the clickers had really been running from something, a new threat which, in narrative terms, I found to be a major letdown compared to the clickers. There's still a lot of tension and a number of pulse-pounding set pieces in the back half of the book, but I just feel like Gonzalez and Williams traded down instead of up in terms of the threat. But, ah well, it wasn't a book-ruining experience, and there are two Clickers sequels to check out so I'm sure I wasn't the only one calling for more of the gruesome, venomous crustaceans. Definitely check it out if your'e a fan of horror or old-timey B-movies.
Asher
I brought the e-book Clickers last week, and finally decided to read it yesterday morning. I enjoyed the book. Yes it's very much of a book written in the style of B movies. I didn't find the book to be particularly scary but I was determined to find out what happened to the writer. He went through a lot of adventures, found a love interest, lost that interest, and may or may not of found a new love interest. What I don't understand is why did the government decide on a cover-up? The monsters in the story are certainly ferocious and the townspeople while brave were also stupid. The picture on the cover of the book is a pretty good demonstration of what the first monsters should look like. I've already started the second book which I was hoping was a sequel that described the survivors, has far as I can tell it's not. Still I can't wait to finish this reading.
Asher
I brought the e-book Clickers last week, and finally decided to read it yesterday morning. I enjoyed the book. Yes it's very much of a book written in the style of B movies. I didn't find the book to be particularly scary but I was determined to find out what happened to the writer. He went through a lot of adventures, found a love interest, lost that interest, and may or may not of found a new love interest. What I don't understand is why did the government decide on a cover-up? The monsters in the story are certainly ferocious and the townspeople while brave were also stupid. The picture on the cover of the book is a pretty good demonstration of what the first monsters should look like. I've already started the second book which I was hoping was a sequel that described the survivors, has far as I can tell it's not. Still I can't wait to finish this reading.