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The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby epub download

by Tom Wolfe


The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby is the title of Tom Wolfe's first collected book of essays, published in 1965.

The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby is the title of Tom Wolfe's first collected book of essays, published in 1965

Contents Cover About the Book About the Author Also by Tom Wolfe Title Page Introduction Part 1 The New Culture-Makers 1 Las Vegas . 5 The First Tycoon of Teen. 6 The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. Part 2 Heroes and Celebrities. 7 The Marvelous Mouth.

Contents Cover About the Book About the Author Also by Tom Wolfe Title Page Introduction Part 1 The New Culture-Makers 1 Las Vegas (What?) Las Vegas (Can’t Hear You! .

In his first book, The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby (1965) Wolfe introduces us to the sixties, to extravagant new styles of life that had nothing to do with the "elite" culture of the . carousel previous carousel next.

In his first book, The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby (1965) Wolfe introduces us to the sixties, to extravagant new styles of life that had nothing to do with the "elite" culture of the past. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. I Am Charlotte Simmons: A Novel.

I'm always rereading Tom Wolfe's The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. Tom Wolfe is a terrific writer. Tom Wolfe (1930-2018) was one of the founders of the New Journalism movement and the author of such contemporary classics as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Right Stuff, and Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers, as well as the novels The Bonfire of the Vanities, A Man in Full, and I Am Charlotte Simmons.

All posts tagged The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby

All posts tagged The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. The Painted Word by Tom Wolfe (1975). I bought this as a Bantam paperback back in 1976 when it cost 65p. Now it costs nearly £11. Tom Wolfe and the New Journalism.

The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. A classic story from Tom Wolfe. George Barris, the pioneering car customizer immortalized in Tom Wolfe's 1963 Esquire story "The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby," died this week. Barris created the Batmobile, the Munster Koach, and other custom cars for movies and television. What better time to read about Harris's impressive work?

In his first book, The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby (1965) Wolfe introduces us to the sixties, to extravagant new styles of life that had nothing to do with the "elite" culture of the past. Connect with the author. Might well be required reading in courses with names like American studies. I'm always rereading Tom Wolfe's The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. The Washington Monthly. Wolfe can do things with words and settings that few writers are capable of matching.

Tom Wolfe mesmerizes us all. The man’s writing contains an eloquent use of. .The book is a vivid example of how being unorthodox at the right moment can do. The man’s writing contains an eloquent use of structure narrative, all while divulging abstract concepts reaching the heart of the American dream. From shake racetracks to car painting, to nannies, radio hosts, and hippies in New York, no writer put his abilities to better use concerning the identity of its characters while giving less information as possible at same time. The Kandy-Kolored shows us the way. It speaks to us, and lets us make up our own mind into the things we love the most. It doesn’t judge, and it really doesn’t care about judging.

Wolfe's brilliant first book - a collection of essays that introduced us to the Sixties, to extravagant new styles of life that had nothing to do with the elite culture of the . To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Wolfe's brilliant first book - a collection of essays that introduced us to the Sixties, to extravagant new styles of life that had nothing to do with the elite culture of the past.

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The author's first book, a unique collection of essays about 1960s lifestyles, peels the lid off the egalitarian subculture of the era. Reprint.

The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby epub download

ISBN13: 978-0553380583

ISBN: 0553380583

Author: Tom Wolfe

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Essays & Correspondence

Language: English

Publisher: Bantam; 1st edition (October 5, 1999)

Pages: 368 pages

ePUB size: 1136 kb

FB2 size: 1432 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 938

Other Formats: doc mobi docx rtf

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mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
When I was in college, the heroes of the journalism department were Vietnam reporters David Halberstam and Neil Sheehan, and the so-called "New Journalism" reporters: Hunter Thompson, Gay Talese, and Tom Wolfe. Today, the best known is Tom Wolfe, thanks to books like "The Right Stuff." His first book was "The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby" published in 1965. It's an anthology of his first magazine articles, that appeared in Esquire and other periodicals.

The magazine article that first attracted attention was "There goes [Vroom! Vroom!] That Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby" about the California custom car culture. At the time, Wolfe didn't know a carburetor from a muffler, being a New Yorker without a car. However, a week in Southern California changed all that. And how. He quickly spotted the best and the brightest of the customizers was a goateed beatnik-type named "Big Daddy" Ed Roth. Roth's cross-town rival George Barris built far more custom cars than Roth, but Roth was the wild visionary--highly-intelligent, articulate, and a little crazy. Wolfe wrote about Roth with insight and understanding that the trade magazines like "Hot Rod," "Car Craft" and "Rod and Custom" apparently lacked.

It was the same thing with "The Last American Hero." Wolfe went down to North Carolina, spent a week with good-old boy NASCAR driver Junior Johnson, and returned with an insight into Johnson and Southern-style stock car racing that completely eluded magazines that covered the sport, among them "Car and Driver," and "Motor Trend."

Wolfe wrote about fashion, too. In "The Secret Vice," he told how Lyndon Johnson woke up one morning and realized that John Kennedy was not only smarter than he, but better dressed ("He dresses like some British ambassador"). Johnson zeroed in on the sleeve of Kennedy's custom-made suits, and realized the button holes on the sleeve were real: they actually buttoned and unbuttoned. The buttons on the sleeve of Johnson's off-the-rack Sears and Roebuck suits, on the other hand, were sewn on top of the fabric, like some decoration. Old Lyndon wanted real buttonholes! He flew to London (where Kennedy's suits were custom-made), walked into the first tailor he could find, and said, "Make me a suit with real buttonholes! I want to look like a British ambassador!"

All the first great magazine articles are here, including "The Fifth Beatle" about brash New York DJ Murray the K, "The Peppermint Lounge" where the Beatles twisted the night away, "Loverboy of the Bourgeoise" about Cary Grant, "The Marvelous Mouth " about Muhammad Ali, "The New Art Gallery Society," "The Nanny Mafia" and on and on. Classics, everyone. And a delight to read--and reread. As one critic put it, "Tom Wolf is a (blankety-blank) joy."
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
When I was in college, the heroes of the journalism department were Vietnam reporters David Halberstam and Neil Sheehan, and the so-called "New Journalism" reporters: Hunter Thompson, Gay Talese, and Tom Wolfe. Today, the best known is Tom Wolfe, thanks to books like "The Right Stuff." His first book was "The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby" published in 1965. It's an anthology of his first magazine articles, that appeared in Esquire and other periodicals.

The magazine article that first attracted attention was "There goes [Vroom! Vroom!] That Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby" about the California custom car culture. At the time, Wolfe didn't know a carburetor from a muffler, being a New Yorker without a car. However, a week in Southern California changed all that. And how. He quickly spotted the best and the brightest of the customizers was a goateed beatnik-type named "Big Daddy" Ed Roth. Roth's cross-town rival George Barris built far more custom cars than Roth, but Roth was the wild visionary--highly-intelligent, articulate, and a little crazy. Wolfe wrote about Roth with insight and understanding that the trade magazines like "Hot Rod," "Car Craft" and "Rod and Custom" apparently lacked.

It was the same thing with "The Last American Hero." Wolfe went down to North Carolina, spent a week with good-old boy NASCAR driver Junior Johnson, and returned with an insight into Johnson and Southern-style stock car racing that completely eluded magazines that covered the sport, among them "Car and Driver," and "Motor Trend."

Wolfe wrote about fashion, too. In "The Secret Vice," he told how Lyndon Johnson woke up one morning and realized that John Kennedy was not only smarter than he, but better dressed ("He dresses like some British ambassador"). Johnson zeroed in on the sleeve of Kennedy's custom-made suits, and realized the button holes on the sleeve were real: they actually buttoned and unbuttoned. The buttons on the sleeve of Johnson's off-the-rack Sears and Roebuck suits, on the other hand, were sewn on top of the fabric, like some decoration. Old Lyndon wanted real buttonholes! He flew to London (where Kennedy's suits were custom-made), walked into the first tailor he could find, and said, "Make me a suit with real buttonholes! I want to look like a British ambassador!"

All the first great magazine articles are here, including "The Fifth Beatle" about brash New York DJ Murray the K, "The Peppermint Lounge" where the Beatles twisted the night away, "Loverboy of the Bourgeoise" about Cary Grant, "The Marvelous Mouth " about Muhammad Ali, "The New Art Gallery Society," "The Nanny Mafia" and on and on. Classics, everyone. And a delight to read--and reread. As one critic put it, "Tom Wolf is a (blankety-blank) joy."
Ffan
If I read this book first in Tom's writing for me I might not have read any more.I found the snob in him showed through a lot.
Ffan
If I read this book first in Tom's writing for me I might not have read any more.I found the snob in him showed through a lot.
Nalmezar
Some funny and insightful material here, but I found myself skimming. I like the later stuff--Bonfire of the Vanities, The Right Stuff, A Man in Full--better.
Nalmezar
Some funny and insightful material here, but I found myself skimming. I like the later stuff--Bonfire of the Vanities, The Right Stuff, A Man in Full--better.
mr.Mine
A delightful sample of Wolfe's contribution to the epochal 60s.
mr.Mine
A delightful sample of Wolfe's contribution to the epochal 60s.
funike
This is a collection of short tales about contemporary New York and America written in the early 1960s. As you might expect, Wolfe is a little more rough around the edges here, and so there is a little hit and miss. However, The Last American Hero, about driver Junior Johnson and the early beginnings of NASCAR, is breathtaking - here are the true buds of Wolfe's ideas on American Masculinity that were to flower in The Right Stuff.
funike
This is a collection of short tales about contemporary New York and America written in the early 1960s. As you might expect, Wolfe is a little more rough around the edges here, and so there is a little hit and miss. However, The Last American Hero, about driver Junior Johnson and the early beginnings of NASCAR, is breathtaking - here are the true buds of Wolfe's ideas on American Masculinity that were to flower in The Right Stuff.
Snowseeker
If you're a Tom Wolfe fan, this is obviously a must-read. The uninitiated can use this as a fine example of New Journalism.
The strongest pieces are up front, specifically on Las Vegas and the beginnings of stock car racing and the title-piece on kustom car culture in Southern California.
The second half of the book lags a bit as most of the stories about the upper-crust of 1960s New York fall into the we-get-the-idea category. Upon modern reading, some of the material seems dated - winkle-picker boots, etc. - but charmingly so. This is a great snapshot of Wolfe and the send-up style that would come to define him.
Snowseeker
If you're a Tom Wolfe fan, this is obviously a must-read. The uninitiated can use this as a fine example of New Journalism.
The strongest pieces are up front, specifically on Las Vegas and the beginnings of stock car racing and the title-piece on kustom car culture in Southern California.
The second half of the book lags a bit as most of the stories about the upper-crust of 1960s New York fall into the we-get-the-idea category. Upon modern reading, some of the material seems dated - winkle-picker boots, etc. - but charmingly so. This is a great snapshot of Wolfe and the send-up style that would come to define him.
The Sinners from Mitar
Unbeatable.
The Sinners from Mitar
Unbeatable.
Vintage Wolfe. Witty, wise and informative.
Vintage Wolfe. Witty, wise and informative.