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AN Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (Classic, 60s) epub download

by Ambrose Bierce


Classic Novels Library. Set during the American Civil War, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek" is Bierce's most famous short story.

Classic Novels Library. Unreliable Narrator Novels. It was first published in the San Francisco Examiner in 1890. It then appeared in Bierce's 1891 collection Tales of Soldiers and Civilians. How far is it to the Owl Creek bridge?" Farquhar asked.

Home Ambrose Bierce An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge. An occurrence at owl cr. .An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, . 1 2 3. An occurrence at owl creek bridge. A man stood upon a railroad bridge in northern Alabama, looking downinto the swift water twenty feet below.

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" (1890) is a short story by the American writer and Civil War veteran Ambrose Bierce. Described as "one of the most famous and frequently anthologized stories in American literature", it was originally published by The San Francisco Examiner on July 13, 1890, and was first collected in Bierce's book Tales of Soldiers and Civilians (1891). The story, which is set during the American Civil War, is known for its irregular time sequence and twist ending.

Ambrose Bierce was an American writer of sardonic short stories based on themes of death and horror. An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge is about a man named Peyton Farquhar. He was a well-off southern planter from Alabama. Peyton, who was ardently devoted to the Southern cause, was prevented from joining the army by circumstance and was eager to serve the South in any way possible. One evening, while he was sitting with his wife, a gray-clad soldier rode up, asked for water, and told them that the Northern army was preparing to advance once the bridge over Owl Creek had been repaired.

An Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge By Ambrose Bierce. Открывайте новую музыку каждый день. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Миллионы композиций бесплатно и в хорошем качестве.

Categories: Contemporary Fiction. Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge. Classic 60s. English. By (author) Ambrose Bierce.

Our story today is called, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge. It was written by Ambrose Bierce. Narrator: A man stood on a railroad bridge in Alabama looking down into the swift waters of the Owl Creek River below. The mans hands were tied behind his back. The occurrence, or event, in our story takes place during the Civil War of the eighteen sixties between the American states of the north and the states of the south. A group of soldiers is hanging a southern farm owner for trying to stop northern military movements across the Owl Creek Bridge. In the last moments of his life, the southern prisoner dreams he has escaped. There was a rope around his neck.

Bierce, in typical Bierce fashion, heads down to Mexico and is never heard of again. He is gone like smoke caught in a Western wind. He then camouflaged these metaphors with leaves and broken branches.

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Read Books Online, for Free. I. Page 1 of 2. More Books. We have hundreds more books for your enjoyment. Read them all! Beyond one of the sentinels nobody was in sight; the railroad ran straight away into a forest for a hundred yards, then, curving, was lost to view. Doubtless there was an outpost farther along. The other bank of the stream was open ground - a gentle slope topped with a stockade of vertical tree trunks, loopholed for rifles, with a single embrasure through which protruded the muzzle of a brass cannon commanding the bridge.

Ambrose Bierce's original and innovative stories differed dramatically from those of his 19th-century contemporaries. These 23 tales include his best and most characteristic short fiction: anti-war satires that underscore the barbarism of bloodshed, horror stories with keenly ironic edge, and sardonic "tall tales" of the Old West.

AN Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (Classic, 60s) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0146002045

ISBN: 0146002040

Author: Ambrose Bierce

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Books (August 1, 1996)

Pages: 96 pages

ePUB size: 1499 kb

FB2 size: 1913 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 909

Other Formats: mobi txt mbr lrf

Related to AN Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (Classic, 60s) ePub books

Capella
First let me say that this review contains spoilers. This is a pity. The only reason I placed these spoilers in this review is that the product description here already lets the cat out of the bag as to the ending. This is a pity.

Anyway....

I first read this story years and years ago. It was one of the many short stories we had to read in a special advanced English course I took in high school. Like most kids of that age I felt I was being force fed a bunch of stuff I had absolutely no interest in and must admit that I fought it. Over the years I have forgotten most to many of the numerous stories we read during that year, which is sort of sad when you think about it, but I have to tell you that this offering from Ambrose Bierce was not one of those that I consciously or unconsciously shuffled either to the back of my mind or out of it completely. No, no - far, far from it! This one has stuck with me throughout the years and I was delighted when I found it as a free Kindle download.

A Confederate man; a planter in northern Alabama during the Civil War has been captured by Union Solders. He has been sentenced to death and the story begins on a railroad bridge as the man stands on a railroad bridge with a rope noose about his neck about to be hanged. The board he is standing upon is tilted and he begins to fall.

This entire short story takes place in the doomed mans mind as he falls to the end of the rope. The reader at this point does not realize this and we watch in sickening slow motion as the rope breaks, the planter hits the water, is shot at, makes a daring escape, struggles through the woods and finally finds himself going up the steps of his home to the loving arms of his wife...snap..white searing light!

As the story progresses in becomes more and more surreal and the reader starts getting hints that not all is as it seems. When you consider when this work was written and published; around 1891, this is a rather remarkable ploy. You know something strange is going to happen but it is not until the final line; the final word that your suspicions are confirmed. Now I have never been hung. I probably should have been on a few occasions, but so far I have been fortunate. I am not at all sure that that much would go through a persons mind during the last three for four seconds of his or her life but that is rather moot. Whether this would actually happen is beside the point. The great thing about this story is that the author had the ability to make it quite real.

This story deserves to be read closely. In truly great short stories what is not written is quite often just as important as what is written. All great short story writers have this ability and Bierce most certainly had it going when he wrote this one.

In many ways this is a haunting story; anyway it was to me. While it most certainly cannot be classified as a horror story I can most emphatically tell you that it horrified me when I first read it. It had the same effect as several of the stories Poe wrote; the impact on my mind was just as great.

The quality of the Kindle download is quite good on this one. It will take you 15 or 10 minutes to read and it is free. It is most certainly worth your time.

Don Blankenship
The Ozarks
Capella
First let me say that this review contains spoilers. This is a pity. The only reason I placed these spoilers in this review is that the product description here already lets the cat out of the bag as to the ending. This is a pity.

Anyway....

I first read this story years and years ago. It was one of the many short stories we had to read in a special advanced English course I took in high school. Like most kids of that age I felt I was being force fed a bunch of stuff I had absolutely no interest in and must admit that I fought it. Over the years I have forgotten most to many of the numerous stories we read during that year, which is sort of sad when you think about it, but I have to tell you that this offering from Ambrose Bierce was not one of those that I consciously or unconsciously shuffled either to the back of my mind or out of it completely. No, no - far, far from it! This one has stuck with me throughout the years and I was delighted when I found it as a free Kindle download.

A Confederate man; a planter in northern Alabama during the Civil War has been captured by Union Solders. He has been sentenced to death and the story begins on a railroad bridge as the man stands on a railroad bridge with a rope noose about his neck about to be hanged. The board he is standing upon is tilted and he begins to fall.

This entire short story takes place in the doomed mans mind as he falls to the end of the rope. The reader at this point does not realize this and we watch in sickening slow motion as the rope breaks, the planter hits the water, is shot at, makes a daring escape, struggles through the woods and finally finds himself going up the steps of his home to the loving arms of his wife...snap..white searing light!

As the story progresses in becomes more and more surreal and the reader starts getting hints that not all is as it seems. When you consider when this work was written and published; around 1891, this is a rather remarkable ploy. You know something strange is going to happen but it is not until the final line; the final word that your suspicions are confirmed. Now I have never been hung. I probably should have been on a few occasions, but so far I have been fortunate. I am not at all sure that that much would go through a persons mind during the last three for four seconds of his or her life but that is rather moot. Whether this would actually happen is beside the point. The great thing about this story is that the author had the ability to make it quite real.

This story deserves to be read closely. In truly great short stories what is not written is quite often just as important as what is written. All great short story writers have this ability and Bierce most certainly had it going when he wrote this one.

In many ways this is a haunting story; anyway it was to me. While it most certainly cannot be classified as a horror story I can most emphatically tell you that it horrified me when I first read it. It had the same effect as several of the stories Poe wrote; the impact on my mind was just as great.

The quality of the Kindle download is quite good on this one. It will take you 15 or 10 minutes to read and it is free. It is most certainly worth your time.

Don Blankenship
The Ozarks
Runehammer
Odd, like an Edgar Allen Poe tale. Only this one is not recommended. I see I have seven more words required, there you have it.
Runehammer
Odd, like an Edgar Allen Poe tale. Only this one is not recommended. I see I have seven more words required, there you have it.
Bev
I loved this movie the first time I saw it. I watched it with my children, but a few short years later, my youngest son and a grandson died in a car wreck. Now, I have other grandchildren, but I still long to see those who aren't with us.

Losing a child or a grandchild will always be with you. Yes, I picked up the pieces, but the counselor I went to told me you never get over it. You just learn to live with it..
Bev
I loved this movie the first time I saw it. I watched it with my children, but a few short years later, my youngest son and a grandson died in a car wreck. Now, I have other grandchildren, but I still long to see those who aren't with us.

Losing a child or a grandchild will always be with you. Yes, I picked up the pieces, but the counselor I went to told me you never get over it. You just learn to live with it..
Ohatollia
Interesting read!
Ohatollia
Interesting read!
Kizshura
good
Kizshura
good
Levion
This is not a book, it is a booklet. I was expecting a full size paperback. I overlooked the fact that it is only 30 pages. Too expensive for what you get so I returned it.
Levion
This is not a book, it is a booklet. I was expecting a full size paperback. I overlooked the fact that it is only 30 pages. Too expensive for what you get so I returned it.
EXIBUZYW
When I was in the sixth grade, I had a teacher who used to show this short film. It was on one of those old reel-to-reel projectors, so I'm telling my age here. In the film, which is set in civil war Alabama (it must have been an Alabama history class), a civilian is about to be hanged from a railroad bridge by soldiers of the Union army. When the plank drops however, he finds himself plunging into the water. He manages to untie himself and swim downstream while dodging bullets. He succeeds in escaping and makes his way thirty miles back home where his wife comes running out the door with open arms to greet him. But there's a twist to the ending so I won't spoil it for you.

Thirty years after watching this film, I read the short story, called "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce. I still can't figure out why I had to watch this film so many times in school. It's supposedly a great work of literature, but it now seems like a piece of southern-culture indoctrination-propaganda as I look back on it and question it. But the story is eerie and morbid and not unlike some of my worst nightmares, so that's why I had to read it.

Written by David Allan Reeves
Author of "Running Away From Me"
EXIBUZYW
When I was in the sixth grade, I had a teacher who used to show this short film. It was on one of those old reel-to-reel projectors, so I'm telling my age here. In the film, which is set in civil war Alabama (it must have been an Alabama history class), a civilian is about to be hanged from a railroad bridge by soldiers of the Union army. When the plank drops however, he finds himself plunging into the water. He manages to untie himself and swim downstream while dodging bullets. He succeeds in escaping and makes his way thirty miles back home where his wife comes running out the door with open arms to greet him. But there's a twist to the ending so I won't spoil it for you.

Thirty years after watching this film, I read the short story, called "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce. I still can't figure out why I had to watch this film so many times in school. It's supposedly a great work of literature, but it now seems like a piece of southern-culture indoctrination-propaganda as I look back on it and question it. But the story is eerie and morbid and not unlike some of my worst nightmares, so that's why I had to read it.

Written by David Allan Reeves
Author of "Running Away From Me"
Beautifully written. Saw this originally as a short movie in 1963, and I was awed. I didn't know the title; I had to wait for the Internet to come along to find it again.
Beautifully written. Saw this originally as a short movie in 1963, and I was awed. I didn't know the title; I had to wait for the Internet to come along to find it again.