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The Man Who Sold the Moon epub download

by Robert A. Heinlein


The Man Who Sold the Moon" is a science fiction novella by American author Robert A. Heinlein, written in 1949 and published in 1950.

The Man Who Sold the Moon" is a science fiction novella by American author Robert A. A part of his Future History and prequel to "Requiem", it covers events around a fictional first Moon landing in 1978 and the schemes of Delos D. Harriman, a businessman who is determined to personally reach and control the Moon.

Robert A. Heinlein, four-time winner of the Hugo Award and recipient of three Retro Hugos, received the first Grand Master Nebula . I think the stories in the man who sold the moon are unique in one very important regard; here we see characters in a world that isn't really complete

Robert A. Heinlein, four-time winner of the Hugo Award and recipient of three Retro Hugos, received the first Grand Master Nebula Award for lifetime achievement. I think the stories in the man who sold the moon are unique in one very important regard; here we see characters in a world that isn't really complete. We are at the dawn of a new technological age and the main characters are scheming not IN their world but to improve it and enlarge it.

Heinlein is a master. The Man Who Sold the Moon was interesting because it was a series of short stories that weave together, from them we glimpse how the future appears to 1940's America. Orphans of the Sky, is a classic SciFi story, it's the blueprint for future writers, it's dystopian, it's in space, it has mutants, it has it all, I can't believe I wanted until now to read it.

Two classic Robert A. Heinlein novels in one All-new Introduction by Mark Van Name. Requiem is the sequel to The Man Who Sold the Moon, but was actually written about 9 year earlier. Two classic Robert A. Heinlein novels in one volume: The Man Who Sold the Moon and Orphans of the Sky. Journeys into space, one taking humans to space by hook or by crook, the other the classic first-time tale of a generation vessel with passengers who do not realize they are in a spaceship. I enjoyed this story quite a bit and it nicely wraps up the loose ends left at the end of The Man Who Sold the Moon. Orphans of the Sky - 9/10 (Awesome).

In his introduction to The Man Who Sold the Moon, John W. Campbell, Jr. makes much the same point, only . makes much the same point, only contrasting Heinlein’s writing with earlier works. But I read the foreword and discovered that Heinlein had written several of his books with the same overarching story such that the events of one story are the history This is a collection of short stories from the master of Science Fiction, Heinlein. I’ve been a big fan of his for years, devouring a lot of his novels.

Heinlein's "Future History" is a unique tapestry, a series of interrelated stories and novels that chronicle human history from the mid-20th century to a time more than twenty centuries hence. The Man Who Sold the Moon is a pivotal work in that tapestry of the future, chronicling the amazing events and discoveries between the "crazy years" and the Age of Space. Heinlein's "Future History" is a unique tapestry, a series of interrelated stories and novels that chronicle human history from the mid-20th century to a time more than twenty centuries hence.

The Man Who Sold the Moon. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The Man Who Sold the Moon. Robert A. Heinlein, the dean of American SF writers, also wrote fantasy fiction throughout his long career, but especially in the early 1940s

The Man Who Sold the Moon. by Robert A. Heinlein. The World Turned Upside Down. Heinlein, the dean of American SF writers, also wrote fantasy fiction throughout his long career, but especially in the early 1940s. The Golden Age of SF was also a time of revolution in fantasy fiction, and Heinlein was at the forefront. His fa. Four Frontiers.

The historians can’t seem to settle whether to call this one "The Third Space War" (or the fourth), or whether "The First Interstellar War" fits it better.

Patterson, J. he stories that make up The Man Who Sold the Moon were among the first Heinlein wrote

Patterson, J. he stories that make up The Man Who Sold the Moon were among the first Heinlein wrote. Both Life-Line (his Opus 2) and ‘Let There Be Light’ (Opus 4) nominally took place when they. were written, in April and May of 1939. It was not at first obvious to others that they belonged to a history of the future, but they were all-plus many more-on a handwritten wall chart Heinlein kept by his writing desk and typewriter, scribbling ideas on the chart in pencil as they came to him.

The Man Who Sold the Moon epub download

ISBN13: 978-1567231557

ISBN: 1567231551

Author: Robert A. Heinlein

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Yestermorrow Inc (April 1, 1999)

ePUB size: 1515 kb

FB2 size: 1926 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 214

Other Formats: azw txt lrf txt

Related to The Man Who Sold the Moon ePub books

Carrot
This may not be the most linear or coherent review you've ever read, but here goes...Here are some thoughts:

I think the stories in the man who sold the moon are unique in one very important regard; here we see characters in a world that isn't really complete. We are at the dawn of a new technological age and the main characters are scheming not IN their world but to improve it and enlarge it.
Heinlein here, imo, shares some of his (apparently) most relatable and doable ideas in space exploration, city engineering and corporate structuring.
In roads rolling, long horizontal strips interconnected not by density but by transportation create the city of the future. Proliferation of -hyperloop- type system could conceivably create supercities or even, optimistically, a sort of paradise combining the tranquillity of suburbia/nature w/ the civilization/culture/economy of a city.
But it wouldn't be Heinlein w/o the political angle and roads rolling doesn't disappoint. A small revolution is being waged, corporate/goverment entities running around; I'm not gonna spoil it.

In the Man Who Sold the Moon we encounter another Heinlein archetype - George Harriman, a strong, inflexible man who always gets what he wants. Compare him to Kettle Bell or maybe Lazarus Long. Same kind of scrappy individualism.

I can go on and on, it's a great collection - so get to it!
Carrot
This may not be the most linear or coherent review you've ever read, but here goes...Here are some thoughts:

I think the stories in the man who sold the moon are unique in one very important regard; here we see characters in a world that isn't really complete. We are at the dawn of a new technological age and the main characters are scheming not IN their world but to improve it and enlarge it.
Heinlein here, imo, shares some of his (apparently) most relatable and doable ideas in space exploration, city engineering and corporate structuring.
In roads rolling, long horizontal strips interconnected not by density but by transportation create the city of the future. Proliferation of -hyperloop- type system could conceivably create supercities or even, optimistically, a sort of paradise combining the tranquillity of suburbia/nature w/ the civilization/culture/economy of a city.
But it wouldn't be Heinlein w/o the political angle and roads rolling doesn't disappoint. A small revolution is being waged, corporate/goverment entities running around; I'm not gonna spoil it.

In the Man Who Sold the Moon we encounter another Heinlein archetype - George Harriman, a strong, inflexible man who always gets what he wants. Compare him to Kettle Bell or maybe Lazarus Long. Same kind of scrappy individualism.

I can go on and on, it's a great collection - so get to it!
Spilberg
This collection of Future History stories was published originally in 1950. There are six works of short fiction here, which were published between August of 1938 and September of 1940, with the exception of the title story, which was first published in this collection. This book was recognized by fans in the Astounding/Analog All-Time Polls in 1952, 1956, and 1966 where it was ranked 4th, 6th, and 14th respectively. There are some minor differences between this edition and the original edition. The stories in the original edition were in chronological order with respect to Heinlein's Future History, but for some reason they were put in a different order in this edition. The original edition also had an introduction from John W. Campbell, Jr., which is not included here.

The stories here are all very good if not great:

"'Let There Be Light'" is about a scientist who creates a cheap and efficient method of converting the Sun's rays into energy. When the establishment tries to take control of his invention, he finds a way to fight back. It was first published in "Super Science Stories" under the pseudonym Lyle Monroe in May of 1940.

In "The Roads Must Roll", moving roads have been created to efficiently transport people without the need of dangerous automobiles. A conspiracy of unsatisfied workers shut down one of the roads in an attempt to gain power, and lead a social revolution among the road technicians. This was first published in "Astounding", in June of 1940. It tied for 28th on the Astounding/Analog All-Time Poll of Short Fiction in 1971.

"The Man Who Sold The Moon" is one of Heinlein's D. D. Harriman stories. In this novella, D. D. Harriman is trying to gain ownership of the Moon. He plans and schemes with his business partners in an effort to generate the revenue needed to make travel to the Moon a reality. He wants to make sure the Moon is not controlled by any nation, to fulfill his dream of man moving to the stars, and his boyhood dream of traveling to the Moon. This story tied for 35th on the 1971 Astounding/Analog All-Time Poll of Short Fiction. It was 5th on the 1999 Locus All-Time Poll for Novella's, and won the Retro Hugo for Best Novella for the year 1950 that was awarded in 2001.

"Requiem", though written before "The Man Who Sold The Moon", takes place after it. In this story D. D. Harriman is desperately trying to get to the Moon before he dies. He does not meet the health requirements for space travel, but he does have his money, and a tremendous resolve. This story was first published in "Astounding" in January of 1940. It tied for 17th on the Locus All-Time Poll for Short Stories in 1999, and won the Prometheus Hall Of Fame award in 2003.

"Life-Line" is the story of a scientist who is scorned by the scientific community for his claims that he can determine when people will die. When his work starts to affect insurance companies, he is sued. For his defense, he forecasts the deaths of the same scientists who rejected him at the start. All that is left is to wait to see if he is correct. This story was first published in "Astounding" in August of 1939. It tied for 14th on the 1971 Astounding/Analog All-Time Poll for Short Fiction written before 1940.

"Blowups Happen" is a story about the dangers of nuclear power, and the psychological affect it has on those who work in the plant who are depended on to keep it from blowing up and killing millions of people. This story was first published in "Astounding" in September of 1940.
Spilberg
This collection of Future History stories was published originally in 1950. There are six works of short fiction here, which were published between August of 1938 and September of 1940, with the exception of the title story, which was first published in this collection. This book was recognized by fans in the Astounding/Analog All-Time Polls in 1952, 1956, and 1966 where it was ranked 4th, 6th, and 14th respectively. There are some minor differences between this edition and the original edition. The stories in the original edition were in chronological order with respect to Heinlein's Future History, but for some reason they were put in a different order in this edition. The original edition also had an introduction from John W. Campbell, Jr., which is not included here.

The stories here are all very good if not great:

"'Let There Be Light'" is about a scientist who creates a cheap and efficient method of converting the Sun's rays into energy. When the establishment tries to take control of his invention, he finds a way to fight back. It was first published in "Super Science Stories" under the pseudonym Lyle Monroe in May of 1940.

In "The Roads Must Roll", moving roads have been created to efficiently transport people without the need of dangerous automobiles. A conspiracy of unsatisfied workers shut down one of the roads in an attempt to gain power, and lead a social revolution among the road technicians. This was first published in "Astounding", in June of 1940. It tied for 28th on the Astounding/Analog All-Time Poll of Short Fiction in 1971.

"The Man Who Sold The Moon" is one of Heinlein's D. D. Harriman stories. In this novella, D. D. Harriman is trying to gain ownership of the Moon. He plans and schemes with his business partners in an effort to generate the revenue needed to make travel to the Moon a reality. He wants to make sure the Moon is not controlled by any nation, to fulfill his dream of man moving to the stars, and his boyhood dream of traveling to the Moon. This story tied for 35th on the 1971 Astounding/Analog All-Time Poll of Short Fiction. It was 5th on the 1999 Locus All-Time Poll for Novella's, and won the Retro Hugo for Best Novella for the year 1950 that was awarded in 2001.

"Requiem", though written before "The Man Who Sold The Moon", takes place after it. In this story D. D. Harriman is desperately trying to get to the Moon before he dies. He does not meet the health requirements for space travel, but he does have his money, and a tremendous resolve. This story was first published in "Astounding" in January of 1940. It tied for 17th on the Locus All-Time Poll for Short Stories in 1999, and won the Prometheus Hall Of Fame award in 2003.

"Life-Line" is the story of a scientist who is scorned by the scientific community for his claims that he can determine when people will die. When his work starts to affect insurance companies, he is sued. For his defense, he forecasts the deaths of the same scientists who rejected him at the start. All that is left is to wait to see if he is correct. This story was first published in "Astounding" in August of 1939. It tied for 14th on the 1971 Astounding/Analog All-Time Poll for Short Fiction written before 1940.

"Blowups Happen" is a story about the dangers of nuclear power, and the psychological affect it has on those who work in the plant who are depended on to keep it from blowing up and killing millions of people. This story was first published in "Astounding" in September of 1940.
Gldasiy
The Man Who Sold the Moon is a series of short stories by the great sci-fi master R.A.H. The short stories in this book were written early in Heinlein's career and cover the later half of the 20th century and how he predicted the future based on the occurrences of World War 2. The primary story is based on a character who's goal in life is to first visit the moon (being the first human) and then setting up a colony on the moon. Harriman (the character) uses is past business successes and his business savvy to convince his friends, his company, and complete nations of children to help back his venture, which is of the goal to fulfill a childhood fantasy instead of make money. The rest of the stories tell of the engineers who make that path possible via their inventions and work and it sets up a beautiful backdrop. The painful part of reading this was Heinlein's attention to detail around concerning everything but the inventions and many of his shady business practices and national politics seem to be more far-fetched than the inventions themselves. But in the end, I did enjoy it, but for all I would recommend that one sticks with Stranger in a Strange Land and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress as they are much better stories.
Gldasiy
The Man Who Sold the Moon is a series of short stories by the great sci-fi master R.A.H. The short stories in this book were written early in Heinlein's career and cover the later half of the 20th century and how he predicted the future based on the occurrences of World War 2. The primary story is based on a character who's goal in life is to first visit the moon (being the first human) and then setting up a colony on the moon. Harriman (the character) uses is past business successes and his business savvy to convince his friends, his company, and complete nations of children to help back his venture, which is of the goal to fulfill a childhood fantasy instead of make money. The rest of the stories tell of the engineers who make that path possible via their inventions and work and it sets up a beautiful backdrop. The painful part of reading this was Heinlein's attention to detail around concerning everything but the inventions and many of his shady business practices and national politics seem to be more far-fetched than the inventions themselves. But in the end, I did enjoy it, but for all I would recommend that one sticks with Stranger in a Strange Land and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress as they are much better stories.
virus
As always Heinlein's writing is engaging and spot on. At the same time he conveys the excitement of the expansion of the human race to the stars and exposes the human failings of politics and business that hamper it. The technology may not have evolved the same way, but the goals are still the same. And somehow Heinlein makes me feel like an important part of that endeavor. From now on I'm going to refer to all the successful businessmen currently pushing the boundaries of human spaceflight (Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Paul Allen, Jeff Bezos, Peter Diamandis, etc) as D.D.
virus
As always Heinlein's writing is engaging and spot on. At the same time he conveys the excitement of the expansion of the human race to the stars and exposes the human failings of politics and business that hamper it. The technology may not have evolved the same way, but the goals are still the same. And somehow Heinlein makes me feel like an important part of that endeavor. From now on I'm going to refer to all the successful businessmen currently pushing the boundaries of human spaceflight (Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Paul Allen, Jeff Bezos, Peter Diamandis, etc) as D.D.
furious ox
The Man Who Sold The Moon is one of Heinlein's best works and that alone says a lot! Having been a Heinlein fan since Jr. High, I have to replace some of my favorites over the years because I reread them quite often. This I have replaced several times because paperbacks tend to wear out when they are read repeatedly. You don't want to miss this story, whether you're a fan or new to Heinlein, this book is great sci-fi! I guarantee you will enjoy this book!
furious ox
The Man Who Sold The Moon is one of Heinlein's best works and that alone says a lot! Having been a Heinlein fan since Jr. High, I have to replace some of my favorites over the years because I reread them quite often. This I have replaced several times because paperbacks tend to wear out when they are read repeatedly. You don't want to miss this story, whether you're a fan or new to Heinlein, this book is great sci-fi! I guarantee you will enjoy this book!
Kulalbine
I read this for a Science Fiction book club discussion. One has to consider the year it was published. It is a classic.
Kulalbine
I read this for a Science Fiction book club discussion. One has to consider the year it was published. It is a classic.
Katishi
Boring, obsolete, not my style at all. Weid, considering he wrote the masterpiece THE MOON IS A HARSH MISTRESS
Katishi
Boring, obsolete, not my style at all. Weid, considering he wrote the masterpiece THE MOON IS A HARSH MISTRESS