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The Violins of Saint-Jacques epub download

by Patrick Leigh Fermor


The Violins of Saint-Jacques is an unexpected presence in the history of Caribbean literature.

The Violins of Saint-Jacques is an unexpected presence in the history of Caribbean literature. Kenneth Ramchand’s pioneering 1970 study, The West Indian Novel and Its Background (revised 2005), fails to mention it. Patrick Leigh Fermor had no deep connection with the region: his novel can be regarded as an interloper, but interlopers are often fascinating characters, even welcome ones. The Violins of Saint-Jacques appeared in 1953, one year after A Brighter Sun by Samuel Selvon, a Trinidadian herald of what would be a prodigious decade for Caribbean fiction.

The Violins of Saint-Jacques book. Finally, the fact that this book was written by Patrick Leigh Fermor, He was widely regarded as Britain's greatest living travel writer during his lifetime. I was interested to read in a bio on him that he was a good friend of one of my favourite authors, Lawrence Durrell; truly a case of what goes around comes around.

Patrick Leigh Fermor is of English and Irish descent.

Ships from and sold by riviera america. Patrick Leigh Fermor is of English and Irish descent. He joined the Irish Guards, became a liaison officer in Albania, fought in Greece and Crete where, during the German occupation, he returned three times (once by parachute).

8 Books about Patrick and Joan Leigh Fermor. Leigh Fermor also wrote a novel, The Violins of Saint-Jacques, which was adapted as an opera by Malcolm Williamson. Leigh Fermor was born in London, the son of Sir Lewis Leigh Fermor, a distinguished geologist, and Muriel Aeyleen, daughter of Charles Taafe Ambler. Shortly after his birth, his mother and sister left to join his father in India, leaving the infant Patrick in England with a family in Northamptonshire: first in the village of Weedon, and later in nearby Dodford.

Автор: Leigh Fermor Patrick Название: The Violins of Saint-Jacques Издательство: Random House (USA) . This slim book starts with the meeting of an English traveler and an enigmatic elderly Frenchwoman on an Aegean island.

This slim book starts with the meeting of an English traveler and an enigmatic elderly Frenchwoman on an Aegean island. He is captivated by a painting that she owns of a busy Caribbean port in the shadow of a volcano, which leads her to tell him the story of her childhood in that town back at the beginning of the twentieth century.

The Violins of Saint-Jacques captures the unforeseen drama of forces beyond human control

The Violins of Saint-Jacques captures the unforeseen drama of forces beyond human control. Originally published in 1953, it was immediately hailed as a rare and exotic sweep of colour across the drab monochrome of the post-war years, and it has lost nothing of its original flavour.

The Violins of Saint-Jacques captures the unforeseen drama of forces beyond human control.

Fermor, Patrick Leigh. West Indies - Fiction. New York : St. Martin's Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on October 9, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Patrick Leigh Fermor. On an Aegean island one summer, an English traveller meets an enigmatic elderly Frenchwoman. Set in the tropical luxury of the island of Saint-Jacques, hers is a tale of romantic intrigue and decadence amongst the descendents of slaves and a fading French aristocracy.

Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- People who bought this also bought. Additional Product Features. Patrick Leigh Fermor. Historical & Mythological Fiction. Roumeli by Patrick Leigh Fermor (Paperback, 2004).

On an Aegean island one summer, an English traveller meets an enigmatic elderly Frenchwoman. He is captivated by a painting she owns of a busy Caribbean port overlooked by a volcano and, in time, she shares the story of her youth there in the early twentieth century.Set in the tropical luxury of the island of Saint-Jacques, hers is a tale of romantic intrigue and decadence amongst the descendents of slaves and a fading French aristocracy. But on the night of the annual Mardi Gras ball, catastrophe overwhelms the island and the world she knew came to an abrupt and haunting end.The Violins of Saint-Jacquescaptures the unforeseen drama of forces beyond human control. Originally published in 1953, it was immediately hailed as a rare and exotic sweep of colour across the drab monochrome of the post-war years, and it has lost nothing of its original flavour.

The Violins of Saint-Jacques epub download

ISBN13: 978-0719555299

ISBN: 0719555299

Author: Patrick Leigh Fermor

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: John Murray Pubs Ltd; New Ed edition (April 2004)

Pages: 144 pages

ePUB size: 1547 kb

FB2 size: 1907 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 629

Other Formats: lit mbr doc txt

Related to The Violins of Saint-Jacques ePub books

jorik
If you've read any of Patrick Leigh Fermor's travel writing, you'll know what to expect from his only published work of fiction. Wild, rich descriptions, a cinematic sense of place, colourful larger-than-life characters ('he combined the appearance of a Neapolitan barber with the manner of a prize bounder and the reputation of a crook') and the necessity to keep a dictionary close at hand.

This 'Tale of the Antilles' is related to the novel's narrator by Berthe, an elderly French lady, who, as a young woman in the early 1900s, had been governess to an aristocratic French family on the (fictional) island of St Jacques. The story concerns the last hours of the island before it is destroyed by the erupting volcano, and the setting is a carnival ball, throughout which a duel, an elopement and all manner of other intrigues ensue.

PLF regularly breaks rules and guidelines of modern creative writing - he does love his lists, and so do I: 'The rest of the room was a jungle of globes, astralabs, telescopes, albums, ancient maps, sheet music and old instruments of all kinds.' Needless to say, this style is not for everyone.

'The Violins of St Jacques' is magical, intoxicating, brilliant, gaudy, melodramatic and completely over the top. There. I've made a list of my own!
jorik
If you've read any of Patrick Leigh Fermor's travel writing, you'll know what to expect from his only published work of fiction. Wild, rich descriptions, a cinematic sense of place, colourful larger-than-life characters ('he combined the appearance of a Neapolitan barber with the manner of a prize bounder and the reputation of a crook') and the necessity to keep a dictionary close at hand.

This 'Tale of the Antilles' is related to the novel's narrator by Berthe, an elderly French lady, who, as a young woman in the early 1900s, had been governess to an aristocratic French family on the (fictional) island of St Jacques. The story concerns the last hours of the island before it is destroyed by the erupting volcano, and the setting is a carnival ball, throughout which a duel, an elopement and all manner of other intrigues ensue.

PLF regularly breaks rules and guidelines of modern creative writing - he does love his lists, and so do I: 'The rest of the room was a jungle of globes, astralabs, telescopes, albums, ancient maps, sheet music and old instruments of all kinds.' Needless to say, this style is not for everyone.

'The Violins of St Jacques' is magical, intoxicating, brilliant, gaudy, melodramatic and completely over the top. There. I've made a list of my own!
Deeroman
First, the plain facts:

In 1902, the Mont Pelee volcano on the island of Martinique in the Carribbean erupted, destroying the nearby village of Saint Pierre (pop. about 29,000). There were only a couple of survivors.

In this short book, Fermor makes a few changes to this event. Here, the island is named Saint-Jacques and the volcano completely destroys the island.

The approach used is that the narrator, in Europe, meets an aged survivor of the disaster and uses her memories to recreate what it might have been like before the big disaster.

I found the book mildly interesting, but my lasting impression is this: just because it's literate doesn't mean it's any good.

And it is literate. Fermor hits you over his head with his learning: he certainly doesn't wear it lightly. There are extended passages in the book of untranslated Latin and French, all sorts of obscure names for spices and vegetation, and in general a high level of language and vocabulary that seemed very similar to that of Lawrence Durrell.

And yet, for all his literacy, I feel the book to be a bit forced. It never really grabs you -- and Fermor apparently has little notion of where he wants to go with his story or what he wants it to mean.

But I might be in the minority with this opinion. Simon Winchester wrote of this book, "This little masterpieces is a perfect tour de force."

And further: "I think this may be my favourite book in the world. I was asked to write the preface for the Oxford University paperback edition. It's about the eruption of Mt Pelée in 1902 on Martinique. It sent this thing, a glowing cloud, a nuée ardente, ash and lava and hot air rolling down the hillside. It completely devastated the town of St-Pierre and there was one survivor out of a population of 30,000. It was the worst volcanic disaster of the century, until the tsunami of 2005. Before that it was Krakatoa in 1883 when 40,000 people died, but most of those died from the tsunamis that followed the eruption. Tsunamis were detected all around the world after that eruption.

"Anyway, there was a ball being held in St-Pierre that night and, of course, everyone at the ball died, but the way it's written is that he supposed all the guests survived and the party continued under the water. Fishermen say that a few miles out to sea when they are waiting for the fish they fancy they can hear music under the water."
Deeroman
First, the plain facts:

In 1902, the Mont Pelee volcano on the island of Martinique in the Carribbean erupted, destroying the nearby village of Saint Pierre (pop. about 29,000). There were only a couple of survivors.

In this short book, Fermor makes a few changes to this event. Here, the island is named Saint-Jacques and the volcano completely destroys the island.

The approach used is that the narrator, in Europe, meets an aged survivor of the disaster and uses her memories to recreate what it might have been like before the big disaster.

I found the book mildly interesting, but my lasting impression is this: just because it's literate doesn't mean it's any good.

And it is literate. Fermor hits you over his head with his learning: he certainly doesn't wear it lightly. There are extended passages in the book of untranslated Latin and French, all sorts of obscure names for spices and vegetation, and in general a high level of language and vocabulary that seemed very similar to that of Lawrence Durrell.

And yet, for all his literacy, I feel the book to be a bit forced. It never really grabs you -- and Fermor apparently has little notion of where he wants to go with his story or what he wants it to mean.

But I might be in the minority with this opinion. Simon Winchester wrote of this book, "This little masterpieces is a perfect tour de force."

And further: "I think this may be my favourite book in the world. I was asked to write the preface for the Oxford University paperback edition. It's about the eruption of Mt Pelée in 1902 on Martinique. It sent this thing, a glowing cloud, a nuée ardente, ash and lava and hot air rolling down the hillside. It completely devastated the town of St-Pierre and there was one survivor out of a population of 30,000. It was the worst volcanic disaster of the century, until the tsunami of 2005. Before that it was Krakatoa in 1883 when 40,000 people died, but most of those died from the tsunamis that followed the eruption. Tsunamis were detected all around the world after that eruption.

"Anyway, there was a ball being held in St-Pierre that night and, of course, everyone at the ball died, but the way it's written is that he supposed all the guests survived and the party continued under the water. Fishermen say that a few miles out to sea when they are waiting for the fish they fancy they can hear music under the water."
Blackbeard
This is a very interesting book, it is the first novel I have ever read by PLF, if it were a travel book it would be wonderful, but as a novel, the plot is not a skillful as the descriptions, so I was left with a feeling of disappointment.
Blackbeard
This is a very interesting book, it is the first novel I have ever read by PLF, if it were a travel book it would be wonderful, but as a novel, the plot is not a skillful as the descriptions, so I was left with a feeling of disappointment.
Ichalote
Far better known for his extensive travel writing, the British author Patrick Leigh Fermor tried his hand at this somewhat fantastic novella in the 1950s of the vanished decadent social world of an imaginary Caribbean island. With its elaborately embroidered descriptions of high living at the turn of the century in a French sugar plantation town and extensive catalogues of names and objects, THE VIOLINS OF ST. JACQUES reads more like a tall tale than anything else. We keep waiting for the embedded narrator's explanation of how this lavish fantastic world came to its end one night during an expensive town-wide Mardi Gras celebration, and when it comes Fermor basically goes berserk, with challenges to duels, elopements, and visitations of lepers. The cover, of course, gives away the final (completely foreseeable) twist: "And to top it all off, the volcano erupts!" (as the wife sings in Leonard Bernstein's TROUBLE IN TAHITI). The plot action is clearly based on the real-life eruption of Mt. Pelee in 1902 on the island of Martinique, which eradicated the town of St. Pierre, although even the details of that notorious catastrophe pales before what happens according to Fermor's imagined variation on this theme. It's too silly to take very seriously, and the (literally) over-the-top denouement renders too ridiculous the lost glamorous world for which the novella longs.
Ichalote
Far better known for his extensive travel writing, the British author Patrick Leigh Fermor tried his hand at this somewhat fantastic novella in the 1950s of the vanished decadent social world of an imaginary Caribbean island. With its elaborately embroidered descriptions of high living at the turn of the century in a French sugar plantation town and extensive catalogues of names and objects, THE VIOLINS OF ST. JACQUES reads more like a tall tale than anything else. We keep waiting for the embedded narrator's explanation of how this lavish fantastic world came to its end one night during an expensive town-wide Mardi Gras celebration, and when it comes Fermor basically goes berserk, with challenges to duels, elopements, and visitations of lepers. The cover, of course, gives away the final (completely foreseeable) twist: "And to top it all off, the volcano erupts!" (as the wife sings in Leonard Bernstein's TROUBLE IN TAHITI). The plot action is clearly based on the real-life eruption of Mt. Pelee in 1902 on the island of Martinique, which eradicated the town of St. Pierre, although even the details of that notorious catastrophe pales before what happens according to Fermor's imagined variation on this theme. It's too silly to take very seriously, and the (literally) over-the-top denouement renders too ridiculous the lost glamorous world for which the novella longs.
Via
This is vintage Fremor. Filled with wonderfully described characters and a treasury of little known historical facts casually seeded throughout the story.
Via
This is vintage Fremor. Filled with wonderfully described characters and a treasury of little known historical facts casually seeded throughout the story.
Ydely
If you have an enormous vocabulary and are interested in how aristocrats partied in Martinique, circa 1902, this novelette is for you -- that is, unless you also expect a good read. The story plays second fiddle to Fermor's painfully convoluted descriptions of furniture, clothing, and dinner parties, salted with stilted conversations among degenerate slave owners.
Ydely
If you have an enormous vocabulary and are interested in how aristocrats partied in Martinique, circa 1902, this novelette is for you -- that is, unless you also expect a good read. The story plays second fiddle to Fermor's painfully convoluted descriptions of furniture, clothing, and dinner parties, salted with stilted conversations among degenerate slave owners.
Bumand
A lovely little novel, full of description that brings the reader to the party.
Bumand
A lovely little novel, full of description that brings the reader to the party.
exquisite detail and luxurious prose.
exquisite detail and luxurious prose.