» » The Miracle: A Novel

The Miracle: A Novel epub download

by John L'Heureux


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The Miracle: A Novel has been added to your Cart.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In a pitch-perfect, deeply satisfying work of fiction selected as a New York Times Notable Book.

John Clarke L'Heureux (October 26, 1934 – April 22, 2019) was an American author.

John L’Heureux’s essay about Parkinson’s disease and California’s Death with Dignity law accompanies his short story . L’Heureux published twenty books of fiction and poetry, including the novels A Woman Run Mad, The Shrine at Altamira, The Miracle, and The Medici Boy.

John L’Heureux’s essay about Parkinson’s disease and California’s Death with Dignity law accompanies his short story The Escape, which appears in the May 6, 2019, issue of The New Yorker. A collection of new and selected stories, The Heart Is a Full-Wild Beast, will be published in December. I was at work on a new book, and this one was turning out to be work indeed.

John Clarke L'Heureux was born in South Hadley, Massachusetts on October 26, 1934. He received a bachelor's degree from Weston College in 1959 and a master's degree in theology from Boston College in 1963. He attended the Woodstock College in Maryland, where he was ordained into the priesthood in 1966. He received a second master's degree in English from Harvard University in 1968. He decided to leave the priesthood and was laicized in 1971.

The miracle : a novel. Clergy, Miracles, Seaside resorts. New York : Atlantic Monthly Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on December 7, 2010.

John L'Heureux has been acclaimed as master storyteller. elegant, cunning, and wickedly funny (The Washington Post). Banished from Boston for his controversial beliefs, a young charismatic priest is assigned to care for a dying priest living in a summer resort town and witnesses a miracle that changes his life.

Read The Miracle, by John L'Heureux online on Bookmate – In a pitch-perfect, deeply satisfying work of fiction selected as a New York Times Notable Book, a Publishers Weekly Best Book, and recipient.

Read The Miracle, by John L'Heureux online on Bookmate – In a pitch-perfect, deeply satisfying work of fiction selected as a New York Times Notable Book, a Publishers Weekly Best Book, and recipien. In a pitch-perfect, deeply satisfying work of fiction selected as a New York Times Notable Book, a Publishers Weekly Best Book, and recipient of the gold Medal for Fiction from the Commonwealth Club of California, master storyteller L'Heureux enters the world of an unorthodox young priest whose faith is put to the test.

John L’Heureux in 1996 at Stanford University, where he taught for 36 years

John L’Heureux in 1996 at Stanford University, where he taught for 36 years. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News Service. John L’Heureux, a prolific author and former Jesuit priest whose fiction grappled with matters of morality, redemption and transcendence, died on Monday at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. He was 84. His wife, Joan L’Heureux, said the cause was complications of Parkinson’s disease.

This interesting book by John L'Heureux prods the phenomenon of miracles, including the big one, resurrection, but also the more mundane variety. The experience is largely mediated through the views of two priests: young Paul LeBlanc, exiled to the boonies because of his dangerous Vatican II views, and Father Moriarty, who's waiting to die from ALS. Both men have profound questions - and doubts - about God, salvation and sin. That's the heart of The Miracle.

In a pitch-perfect, deeply satisfying work of fiction selected as a New York Times Notable Book, a Publishers Weekly Best Book, and recipient of the gold Medal for Fiction from the Commonwealth Club of California, master storyteller L'Heureux enters the world of an unorthodox young priest whose faith is put to the test. Father Paul LeBlanc is young, handsome, and charismatic, but he has dangerous ideas on sex, marriage, and birth control - and he just doesn't uphold the decorum expected of a young priest.

Banished from Boston for his controversial beliefs, a young charismatic priest is assigned to care for a dying priest living in a summer resort town and witnesses a miracle that changes his life.

The Miracle: A Novel epub download

ISBN13: 978-0871138576

ISBN: 0871138573

Author: John L'Heureux

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Pr; 1 edition (October 1, 2002)

Pages: 240 pages

ePUB size: 1999 kb

FB2 size: 1587 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 710

Other Formats: lrf mbr doc txt

Related to The Miracle: A Novel ePub books

Arar
Unless you grew up, and now continue to have Faith in God on your mind, this book may well bore you to tears. The writing is workman like, the plot, such as it is, is in the service of an idea rather than in the service of real characters. It is exceedingly dry and repetitive and quite frankly artless. I am very disappointed. I ordered this book because I recently read a short fiction piece of his in The New Yorker which I thought was one of the best short pieces I have ever read. I am thankful for that piece; but in the future, I will avoid his long works.
Arar
Unless you grew up, and now continue to have Faith in God on your mind, this book may well bore you to tears. The writing is workman like, the plot, such as it is, is in the service of an idea rather than in the service of real characters. It is exceedingly dry and repetitive and quite frankly artless. I am very disappointed. I ordered this book because I recently read a short fiction piece of his in The New Yorker which I thought was one of the best short pieces I have ever read. I am thankful for that piece; but in the future, I will avoid his long works.
Xtintisha
This is beautifully written about characters that I came to really care for. They seem very human and their problems kept me reading with real interest. This is a book you won't put down.
Xtintisha
This is beautifully written about characters that I came to really care for. They seem very human and their problems kept me reading with real interest. This is a book you won't put down.
Light out of Fildon
Any writer who attempts to create a work of fiction with a priest as a protagonist is facing a great challenge. Writers such as George Bernanos and Graham Greene masterfully set the standard to which all other works in this genre are compared. Though THE MIRACLE will probably never be in the same category as DIARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST or THE POWER AND THE GLORY, John L'Heuroux's Fr. Paul Le Blanc is a multi-dimensional character in a relatively good piece of fiction.
THE MIRACLE tells the story of Fr. Paul Le Blanc, a maverick priest in Boston. He is handsome and ready to change the world. The novel takes place in the early 1970's, and Le Blanc is faced with the issues of the day: the aftermath of Vatican II, the debate raging around artificial birth control, Vietnam, and since the novel takes place in Boston, involuntary busing to end desegregation in Boston's Public Schools. Le Blanc, like many young priests, is liberal on these matters, and as a result is sent to a new parish here he has to face his own inadequacies and spiritual trials. His life changes when he is transferred to a new parish and witnesses a miracle, not of his own doing, and he is forced to reexamine his life. He does this through his encounters with a wide range of interesting characters: Fr. Moriarty, a priest with ALS; Rose, the housekeeper and her troubled daughter Mandy; Msgr. Glynn, a loyal churchman; and Annaka Malley, a young parishioner questioning her own life.
The book's chief strength is that it does not fall victim to stereotypes. Le Blanc is not a raging alcoholic, a womanizer,.... an atheist, or if it were written today,..... He is a priest who has the ability to minister wonderfully to others, but has difficulty integrating the message in his own life. This is probably a more accurate depiction of what truly ails many priests today, especially as many try to rebuild a church destroyed by the actions of some of their brother priests and the bishops who covered up the matter. We see a man tormented by inner struggles, but these struggles do not seem to interfere with his ministry, though they do interfere with his relationship with God.
If the main character of the book is so strong, why does it only rate three stars?
Though the book is filled with many colorful characters and the plot moves quickly due to L'Heureux's fluid style, the work is not without its problems. There are some clichés. For example, the young, radical priest being sent to an out of the way parish to care for a sick pastor and learn humility reminds the reader of the film THE CARDINAL. His encounter with an Annaka Malley, one of the female characters, has been told again and again in other writings. People familiar with Boston's history will know that the leader of the Archdiocese at the time, Cardinal Humberto Medeiros was an outspoken critic of those opposed to busing, and his position made him reviled in Boston, unlike the bishop of the book who does not want to cause a stir. A bishop who was socially liberal but theologically conservative, as Medeiros was, conflicting with Le Blanc, would probably strengthen the book. Keep in mind, I write this as a native Bostonian. I also did not have a feeling that I was reading a book about a priest in the 1970's, as much as a book about a priest of the 1990's put in a 1970's setting.
Even though it is not a perfect book, readers familiar with Catholicism who enjoy exploring the faith through fiction will undoubtedly enjoy the book as I did.
Light out of Fildon
Any writer who attempts to create a work of fiction with a priest as a protagonist is facing a great challenge. Writers such as George Bernanos and Graham Greene masterfully set the standard to which all other works in this genre are compared. Though THE MIRACLE will probably never be in the same category as DIARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST or THE POWER AND THE GLORY, John L'Heuroux's Fr. Paul Le Blanc is a multi-dimensional character in a relatively good piece of fiction.
THE MIRACLE tells the story of Fr. Paul Le Blanc, a maverick priest in Boston. He is handsome and ready to change the world. The novel takes place in the early 1970's, and Le Blanc is faced with the issues of the day: the aftermath of Vatican II, the debate raging around artificial birth control, Vietnam, and since the novel takes place in Boston, involuntary busing to end desegregation in Boston's Public Schools. Le Blanc, like many young priests, is liberal on these matters, and as a result is sent to a new parish here he has to face his own inadequacies and spiritual trials. His life changes when he is transferred to a new parish and witnesses a miracle, not of his own doing, and he is forced to reexamine his life. He does this through his encounters with a wide range of interesting characters: Fr. Moriarty, a priest with ALS; Rose, the housekeeper and her troubled daughter Mandy; Msgr. Glynn, a loyal churchman; and Annaka Malley, a young parishioner questioning her own life.
The book's chief strength is that it does not fall victim to stereotypes. Le Blanc is not a raging alcoholic, a womanizer,.... an atheist, or if it were written today,..... He is a priest who has the ability to minister wonderfully to others, but has difficulty integrating the message in his own life. This is probably a more accurate depiction of what truly ails many priests today, especially as many try to rebuild a church destroyed by the actions of some of their brother priests and the bishops who covered up the matter. We see a man tormented by inner struggles, but these struggles do not seem to interfere with his ministry, though they do interfere with his relationship with God.
If the main character of the book is so strong, why does it only rate three stars?
Though the book is filled with many colorful characters and the plot moves quickly due to L'Heureux's fluid style, the work is not without its problems. There are some clichés. For example, the young, radical priest being sent to an out of the way parish to care for a sick pastor and learn humility reminds the reader of the film THE CARDINAL. His encounter with an Annaka Malley, one of the female characters, has been told again and again in other writings. People familiar with Boston's history will know that the leader of the Archdiocese at the time, Cardinal Humberto Medeiros was an outspoken critic of those opposed to busing, and his position made him reviled in Boston, unlike the bishop of the book who does not want to cause a stir. A bishop who was socially liberal but theologically conservative, as Medeiros was, conflicting with Le Blanc, would probably strengthen the book. Keep in mind, I write this as a native Bostonian. I also did not have a feeling that I was reading a book about a priest in the 1970's, as much as a book about a priest of the 1990's put in a 1970's setting.
Even though it is not a perfect book, readers familiar with Catholicism who enjoy exploring the faith through fiction will undoubtedly enjoy the book as I did.
SoSok
Father Paul LeBlanc is a troubled priest--good-looking and witty--too witty--gets in trouble with the local hierarchy--is "exiled" from his South Boston parish to the New Hampshire coast. There he is supposed to be assisting the pastor, Father Tom Moriarty, who is dying of Lou Gehrig's disease. As he struggles with his vocation, spirituality, sexuality, trying to be a good priest, he is peripherally involved in a miracle. A girl who seemed to be dead, but then is alive.
If this is a turning point for the troubled priest, it is hard to say where it takes him. Confusion, irritability, conflicts about intimacy, a night of wild lovemaking with his housekeeper, terrible guilt, questions about his vocation, and finally his decision to renounce the priesthood.
It could have been a great story, but it left me disappointed. The characters seem to have been sent over from central casting, and--in spite of much introspection about their inner conflicts--they remain poorly developed. The troubled priest, the alcoholic priest, the alcoholic town doctor, the woman who fears commitment, the dying priest who is reputed to be a "saint" or at least to have great wisdom--all remain sketchy and hard to connect with. The story meanders to an inconclusive ending.
L'heureux writes well, and the book is an easy read. I found it entertaining. It could have been so much better.
SoSok
Father Paul LeBlanc is a troubled priest--good-looking and witty--too witty--gets in trouble with the local hierarchy--is "exiled" from his South Boston parish to the New Hampshire coast. There he is supposed to be assisting the pastor, Father Tom Moriarty, who is dying of Lou Gehrig's disease. As he struggles with his vocation, spirituality, sexuality, trying to be a good priest, he is peripherally involved in a miracle. A girl who seemed to be dead, but then is alive.
If this is a turning point for the troubled priest, it is hard to say where it takes him. Confusion, irritability, conflicts about intimacy, a night of wild lovemaking with his housekeeper, terrible guilt, questions about his vocation, and finally his decision to renounce the priesthood.
It could have been a great story, but it left me disappointed. The characters seem to have been sent over from central casting, and--in spite of much introspection about their inner conflicts--they remain poorly developed. The troubled priest, the alcoholic priest, the alcoholic town doctor, the woman who fears commitment, the dying priest who is reputed to be a "saint" or at least to have great wisdom--all remain sketchy and hard to connect with. The story meanders to an inconclusive ending.
L'heureux writes well, and the book is an easy read. I found it entertaining. It could have been so much better.
Brialelis
Having read and loved A Woman Run Mad, I couldn't wait to read another one of John L'Heureux's novels. The Miracle is the dark, thought-provoking tale of a charismatic, albeit somewhat arrogant priest and his trials and struggles as his chastity and faith take a turn toward disaster. Paul LeBlanc's life isn't the same after he is transferred from his South Boston parish to a small church in New Hampshire. When a teenage girl awakens after she had been pronounced dead from a drug overdose, Paul is convinced that the occurrence is a miracle. However, his life falls apart after he embarks on an affair with a woman and the teenage girl dies in an accident not long after the drug scare. There are some staggering, ironic twists throughout the novel.

The Miracle has the sort of disarming and dark language that I loved in A Woman Run Mad. John L'Heureux is a great author. I love his ironic language and disturbing stories. I look forward to reading more of his books. In the meantime, I highly recommend this gem...
Brialelis
Having read and loved A Woman Run Mad, I couldn't wait to read another one of John L'Heureux's novels. The Miracle is the dark, thought-provoking tale of a charismatic, albeit somewhat arrogant priest and his trials and struggles as his chastity and faith take a turn toward disaster. Paul LeBlanc's life isn't the same after he is transferred from his South Boston parish to a small church in New Hampshire. When a teenage girl awakens after she had been pronounced dead from a drug overdose, Paul is convinced that the occurrence is a miracle. However, his life falls apart after he embarks on an affair with a woman and the teenage girl dies in an accident not long after the drug scare. There are some staggering, ironic twists throughout the novel.

The Miracle has the sort of disarming and dark language that I loved in A Woman Run Mad. John L'Heureux is a great author. I love his ironic language and disturbing stories. I look forward to reading more of his books. In the meantime, I highly recommend this gem...