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Claimed! (Dodo Press) epub download

by Francis Stevens


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Gertrude Barrows Bennett (1883-1948) was the first major female writer of fantasy and science fiction in the United States.

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Among her most famous books are Claimed! . The Citadel of Fear (Dodo Press).

Among her most famous books are Claimed! (1920) and the lost world novel The Citadel of Fear (1918). Bennett also wrote an early dystopian novel, The Heads of Cerberus (1919). Gertrude Barrows Bennett (1883-1948) was the first maj. т 487. The Heads of Cerberus (Dodo Press). т 1412. т 1662. Hope!: A Story of Change in Obama's America (Graphic Flash).

Claimed! (Dodo Press). Dodo Press, Book Depository Limited.

Gertrude Barrows Bennett (1883-1948) was the first major female writer of fantasy and science fiction in the United States, publishing her stories under the pseudonym Francis Stevens. She completed school through the eighth grade then attended night school in hopes of becoming an illustrator, a goal she never achieved. Bennett wrote a number of highly acclaimed fantasies between 1917 and 1923. Her first published story, the novella Nightmare!, appeared in All-Story Weekly in 1917. Among her most famous books are Claimed! (1920) and the lost world novel The Citadel of Fear (1918).

A month from today, I 'll be doing a reading and book signing for my novel, at Vroman's Bookstore, in Pasadena, on June 28th, at 4 . Hope some of you could come out and get a little crazy for me :) The Death of Francis Stevens is at Vromans Bookstore, Pasadena.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Frank Stevens books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Unseen - Unfeared, and Behind the Curtain (Dodo Press).

Francis Stevens, a pseudonym for Gertrude Barrows Bennett (1883-1948), is the author of such classics as The Citadel of Fear and The Heads of Cerberus.

Claimed! Francis Stevens. Last updated Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 14:23. To the best of our knowledge, the text of this work is in the Public Domain in Australia. eBooksaide The University of Adelaide Library University of Adelaide South Australia 5005. Table of Contents Next . .

Claimed! – Ebook written by Francis Stevens

Claimed! – Ebook written by Francis Stevens. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Claimed!. Claimed opens with the recovery of a mysterious artifact - a strange green box bearing an undecipherable inscription - from an uncharted island following an undersea volcanic explosion that nearly dooms the ship that discovers it. Brought back to civilization, the box is purchased by a crochety old millionaire who very quickly comes to regret it.

Thus, in most countries the laws of property are complex in the extreme; punishable acts in connexion with them are numerous and often difficult to define.

Thus, in most countries the laws of property are complex in the extreme; punishable acts in connexion with them are numerous and often difficult to define a very simple manner: in the first place, instead of strict laws binding men down by written words, they appoint a number of citizens who shall have it in their discretion to decide whether a man's actions are worthy of punishment or no; and these appointed citizens have also the power to assign the. Punishment, which may vary from a single day's imprisonment to a li.

Gertrude Barrows Bennett (1883-1948) was the first major female writer of fantasy and science fiction in the United States, publishing her stories under the pseudonym Francis Stevens. She completed school through the eighth grade then attended night school in hopes of becoming an illustrator, a goal she never achieved. She began working as a stenographer, a job she held on and off for the rest of her life. She began to write a number of short stories and novels, only stopping when her mother died in 1920. Bennett wrote a number of highly acclaimed fantasies between 1917 and 1923. Her first published story, the novella Nightmare!, appeared in All-Story Weekly in 1917. Among her most famous books are Claimed! (1920) and the lost world novel The Citadel of Fear (1918). Bennett also wrote an early dystopian novel, The Heads of Cerberus (1919). She has been recognized in recent years as a pioneering female fantasy author. Amongst her other works are Unseen - Unfeared (1919), Serapion (1920) and Elf Trap.

Claimed! (Dodo Press) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1406576115

ISBN: 1406576115

Author: Francis Stevens

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Dodo Press (February 22, 2008)

Pages: 144 pages

ePUB size: 1387 kb

FB2 size: 1648 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 877

Other Formats: lrf txt lit lrf

Related to Claimed! (Dodo Press) ePub books

Rich Vulture
A collection of short stories by Francis Stevens

Preface - a captain and crew arrive at an island

Mr. Lutz and the strange sailor - a shopkeeper meets a seemingly mad stranger.

Next is what seems like a serial to me, one that you would have seen in the magazines
all involving a Dr. Vanaman (Sounds too close to Venkman!)

It starts with a doctor receiving a strange call in the middle of the night involving an
old man, his beautiful daughter, and a strange box that the old man protects

Stories in order

Dr. Vanaman's Night Call
The Green Invasion
The Silent Message
The Sinking Inscription
White Horses
Psychometry
A Daring Challenge
Outward Bound
James Blair, A.B.
Sea-God's Prize
In Pursuit of the Flying Dutchman
The Apparition
Claimed!

Good stories which keep you going and you don't want to end! Must read
Rich Vulture
A collection of short stories by Francis Stevens

Preface - a captain and crew arrive at an island

Mr. Lutz and the strange sailor - a shopkeeper meets a seemingly mad stranger.

Next is what seems like a serial to me, one that you would have seen in the magazines
all involving a Dr. Vanaman (Sounds too close to Venkman!)

It starts with a doctor receiving a strange call in the middle of the night involving an
old man, his beautiful daughter, and a strange box that the old man protects

Stories in order

Dr. Vanaman's Night Call
The Green Invasion
The Silent Message
The Sinking Inscription
White Horses
Psychometry
A Daring Challenge
Outward Bound
James Blair, A.B.
Sea-God's Prize
In Pursuit of the Flying Dutchman
The Apparition
Claimed!

Good stories which keep you going and you don't want to end! Must read
Peras
Pre-Lovecraft tale of mythological or cosmic terror. Literate. Enjoyable. Thought provoking. Recommended for anyone who appreciates Arthur Machen, Robert Howard, or Lovecraft.
Peras
Pre-Lovecraft tale of mythological or cosmic terror. Literate. Enjoyable. Thought provoking. Recommended for anyone who appreciates Arthur Machen, Robert Howard, or Lovecraft.
MrCat
Interesting and entertaining piece of weird fiction from the golden age. Stevens is little known in our time and should be reconsidered in light of Lovecraft's current popularity.
MrCat
Interesting and entertaining piece of weird fiction from the golden age. Stevens is little known in our time and should be reconsidered in light of Lovecraft's current popularity.
Pedora
At the tail end of my review of Francis Stevens' 1919 novel "The Heads of Cerberus," I mentioned that the author was now a very solid 2 for 2 with me, having loved that book as well as 1918's "The Citadel of Fear," and that I had a feeling that once I took in her 1920 novel, "Claimed," that she would be an even more solid 3 for 3. Well, as I predicted, such is indeed the case, now that I have finally read her most impressive third novel. While "Citadel" had dealt with the discovery of a lost Aztec city and battling gods (Quetzalcoatl and Nacoc-Yaotl), and the dystopian "Cerberus" with a totalitarian Philadelphia in an alternate-reality future, "Claimed" has, at its center, a mysterious green box that had been belched out of the ocean depths after a seismic event near the Azores, and the horrific events that befall its later owners. It is yet another minor masterpiece of dark fantasy, from the woman who practically jump-started the genre single-handed.

Again, Francis Stevens was the pen name of Gertrude Barrows Bennett (1883 – 1948), a Minneapolis-born widow and mother who turned to writing to support her own invalid mother and who, between 1917 and '23, came out with five novels and seven shorter pieces that are highly regarded today by discriminating fans of the fantastic. Back when, readers believed that the author was a man, possibly the pseudonym of Abraham Merritt, who was indeed a fan of hers, as was H.P. Lovecraft himself, who has been quoted as saying that "Claimed" is "one of the strangest and most compelling science fantasy novels you will ever read." Famously, sci-fi critic Sam Moskowitz has called her "the most gifted woman writer of science fiction and science-fantasy between Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and C.L. Moore." The authoress, to my mind, is criminally undervalued today, and a perusal of "Claimed" is as good a place as any to demonstrate her manifold gifts. The novel first appeared as a three-part serial in the March 6 – 20, 1920 issues of "Argosy" magazine (the original pulp magazine, as it's been called, which published from 1882 all the way to 1979, and in which Merritt and Edgar Rice Burroughs also placed much of their work), copping the cover illustration for the March 6th issue. The novel was later reprinted in the "Famous Fantastic Mysteries" pulp in April '41, and saw its first release in book form in 1966.

In the novel, the reader encounters Jesse J. Robinson, the meanest and wealthiest citizen of (the fictitious town of) Tremont, near the Delaware River; whether in Pennsylvania or New Jersey is never made explicitly clear. A collector of antiquities, the cantankerous old coot has just purchased a doozy from a local curio dealer: a foot-long green box, of unknown material and make, with an inscription on its top in scarlet letters--of an unknown alphabet--that have the most peculiar propensity of always, somehow, moving to the bottom of said box! As the days pass, Robinson and his niece, the silver-haired Leilah, become subject to strange hallucinations of the sea, and of a monstrous dark shape who threatens them in their dreams. A young doctor, John Vanaman, is called in to attend Robinson after the elderly crank is found unconscious one evening, and the young man quickly becomes enamored with the elfin niece, while falling prey to the same ghastly visitations. Soon, it is learned that the sailor who originally picked up the box near the Azores, as well as that curio dealer, have separately purchased white stallions with the aim of slitting the animals' throats in sacrifice! And when uncle and niece are abducted and brought out to sea, Vanaman conducts a heated chase via hired cargo steamer, all leading to a showdown on the Atlantic aboard a moldering trireme, oared by a crew of the dead....

Mysterious, beautifully written, at times hallucinatory, and with a creeping atmosphere of dread to spare, "Claimed" is most surely an impressive piece of imaginative work. I mentioned earlier that many readers of Stevens automatically assumed that she must be a man, and a look at the novel in question will perhaps demonstrate why. Stevens' knowledge of nautical terms certainly smacks of an experienced seaman, as does the tough talk that comes out of the sailors' mouths. The author does not shrink from the depiction of violence and bloodshed, either. As in "The Citadel of Fear," here, an ancient god appears in modern times to stir up trouble, but in "Claimed," that god is never named (although Poseidon/Neptune is strongly suggested) or even clearly seen. Much in the story goes unexplained by the tale's end, and thus, the reader never does learn the facts behind that ghostly galley and what precisely is inside the mysterious casket. The ultimate fate of old Robinson, too, is never clearly delineated. The reader must exercise his/her powers of imagination, hence, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

One thing that Francis does vouchsafe to show us, via a phantasmagoric illusion at sea, is the horrendous fate that befell the continent of Atlantis, and just how the coveted box wound up in the drink to begin with, and it really is some fascinating stuff. Vanaman, Leilah and especially old Robinson, I should add, are all well-drawn characters, with the good doctor being especially likable and sympathetic. Stevens peppers her novel with many memorable and haunting scenes, including an early exploration of the newly risen, barren island where the relic is initially found; a clairvoyant's unfortunate attempt to perform a little psychometry on the arcane object; and, indeed, the entire final 1/3 of the book, comprising as it does a tense chase at sea. The book has great sweep and drive, and is fairly relentless once it gets moving. Personally, I could not wait to get home after work to get back to it, and the evenings that I spent reading "Claimed" were very gripping ones, to be sure.

Today, the novel may be easily obtained thanks to a publisher called Sense of Wonder Press (and the book most definitely does have that elusive sense of wonder, in spades!), whose current edition is a very nice one. All lovers of dark fantasy should certainly eat this one right up. Strangely enough, though the book was written almost a century ago, it feels quite modern, and really, there is virtually nothing in it that would preclude the assumption that it is transpiring in the early 21st century. So yes, Francis Stevens is now a very solid 3 for 3 with me. And I have a feeling that when I next read the Bison Books collection entitled "The Nightmare and Other Tales of Dark Fantasy," which gathers together the Stevens novel "The Labyrinth" in addition to seven novellas and short stories, in one large 400-page volume, that the woman will be an even more impressive 11 for 11....

(By the way, this review originally appeared on the Fantasy Literature website ... a most ideal destination for all fans of Francis Stevens....)
Pedora
At the tail end of my review of Francis Stevens' 1919 novel "The Heads of Cerberus," I mentioned that the author was now a very solid 2 for 2 with me, having loved that book as well as 1918's "The Citadel of Fear," and that I had a feeling that once I took in her 1920 novel, "Claimed," that she would be an even more solid 3 for 3. Well, as I predicted, such is indeed the case, now that I have finally read her most impressive third novel. While "Citadel" had dealt with the discovery of a lost Aztec city and battling gods (Quetzalcoatl and Nacoc-Yaotl), and the dystopian "Cerberus" with a totalitarian Philadelphia in an alternate-reality future, "Claimed" has, at its center, a mysterious green box that had been belched out of the ocean depths after a seismic event near the Azores, and the horrific events that befall its later owners. It is yet another minor masterpiece of dark fantasy, from the woman who practically jump-started the genre single-handed.

Again, Francis Stevens was the pen name of Gertrude Barrows Bennett (1883 – 1948), a Minneapolis-born widow and mother who turned to writing to support her own invalid mother and who, between 1917 and '23, came out with five novels and seven shorter pieces that are highly regarded today by discriminating fans of the fantastic. Back when, readers believed that the author was a man, possibly the pseudonym of Abraham Merritt, who was indeed a fan of hers, as was H.P. Lovecraft himself, who has been quoted as saying that "Claimed" is "one of the strangest and most compelling science fantasy novels you will ever read." Famously, sci-fi critic Sam Moskowitz has called her "the most gifted woman writer of science fiction and science-fantasy between Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and C.L. Moore." The authoress, to my mind, is criminally undervalued today, and a perusal of "Claimed" is as good a place as any to demonstrate her manifold gifts. The novel first appeared as a three-part serial in the March 6 – 20, 1920 issues of "Argosy" magazine (the original pulp magazine, as it's been called, which published from 1882 all the way to 1979, and in which Merritt and Edgar Rice Burroughs also placed much of their work), copping the cover illustration for the March 6th issue. The novel was later reprinted in the "Famous Fantastic Mysteries" pulp in April '41, and saw its first release in book form in 1966.

In the novel, the reader encounters Jesse J. Robinson, the meanest and wealthiest citizen of (the fictitious town of) Tremont, near the Delaware River; whether in Pennsylvania or New Jersey is never made explicitly clear. A collector of antiquities, the cantankerous old coot has just purchased a doozy from a local curio dealer: a foot-long green box, of unknown material and make, with an inscription on its top in scarlet letters--of an unknown alphabet--that have the most peculiar propensity of always, somehow, moving to the bottom of said box! As the days pass, Robinson and his niece, the silver-haired Leilah, become subject to strange hallucinations of the sea, and of a monstrous dark shape who threatens them in their dreams. A young doctor, John Vanaman, is called in to attend Robinson after the elderly crank is found unconscious one evening, and the young man quickly becomes enamored with the elfin niece, while falling prey to the same ghastly visitations. Soon, it is learned that the sailor who originally picked up the box near the Azores, as well as that curio dealer, have separately purchased white stallions with the aim of slitting the animals' throats in sacrifice! And when uncle and niece are abducted and brought out to sea, Vanaman conducts a heated chase via hired cargo steamer, all leading to a showdown on the Atlantic aboard a moldering trireme, oared by a crew of the dead....

Mysterious, beautifully written, at times hallucinatory, and with a creeping atmosphere of dread to spare, "Claimed" is most surely an impressive piece of imaginative work. I mentioned earlier that many readers of Stevens automatically assumed that she must be a man, and a look at the novel in question will perhaps demonstrate why. Stevens' knowledge of nautical terms certainly smacks of an experienced seaman, as does the tough talk that comes out of the sailors' mouths. The author does not shrink from the depiction of violence and bloodshed, either. As in "The Citadel of Fear," here, an ancient god appears in modern times to stir up trouble, but in "Claimed," that god is never named (although Poseidon/Neptune is strongly suggested) or even clearly seen. Much in the story goes unexplained by the tale's end, and thus, the reader never does learn the facts behind that ghostly galley and what precisely is inside the mysterious casket. The ultimate fate of old Robinson, too, is never clearly delineated. The reader must exercise his/her powers of imagination, hence, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

One thing that Francis does vouchsafe to show us, via a phantasmagoric illusion at sea, is the horrendous fate that befell the continent of Atlantis, and just how the coveted box wound up in the drink to begin with, and it really is some fascinating stuff. Vanaman, Leilah and especially old Robinson, I should add, are all well-drawn characters, with the good doctor being especially likable and sympathetic. Stevens peppers her novel with many memorable and haunting scenes, including an early exploration of the newly risen, barren island where the relic is initially found; a clairvoyant's unfortunate attempt to perform a little psychometry on the arcane object; and, indeed, the entire final 1/3 of the book, comprising as it does a tense chase at sea. The book has great sweep and drive, and is fairly relentless once it gets moving. Personally, I could not wait to get home after work to get back to it, and the evenings that I spent reading "Claimed" were very gripping ones, to be sure.

Today, the novel may be easily obtained thanks to a publisher called Sense of Wonder Press (and the book most definitely does have that elusive sense of wonder, in spades!), whose current edition is a very nice one. All lovers of dark fantasy should certainly eat this one right up. Strangely enough, though the book was written almost a century ago, it feels quite modern, and really, there is virtually nothing in it that would preclude the assumption that it is transpiring in the early 21st century. So yes, Francis Stevens is now a very solid 3 for 3 with me. And I have a feeling that when I next read the Bison Books collection entitled "The Nightmare and Other Tales of Dark Fantasy," which gathers together the Stevens novel "The Labyrinth" in addition to seven novellas and short stories, in one large 400-page volume, that the woman will be an even more impressive 11 for 11....

(By the way, this review originally appeared on the Fantasy Literature website ... a most ideal destination for all fans of Francis Stevens....)
Qucid
An island is raised up from the unplumbed depths of the ocean by volcanic activity. A passing ship explores the island, and the landscape strangely resembles ruins ... but surely that's just overactive imagination. Still, one of the crew brings back a keepsake, something that resembles a small box that won't open, inscribed in an unknown language. And before long, Something comes looking for that box ...

Sounds like prime HP Lovecraft, right?

Close, but wrong -- this solid story by Francis Stevens (born Gertrude Barrows Bennett) was reportedly read & praised by Lovecraft, and it preceded his classic "The Call of Cthulhu" by several years. It wouldn't surprise me in the least if it influenced that classic, too. Because this is very good dark fantasy writing indeed, by an author who deserves rediscovery by fans of the genre. And while it foreshadows Lovecraft, it has its own style & tone:

"And now Vanaman grew aware that with the green sea-tide something else had entered the room. He could not see it. The evidence of its presence was yet purely intuitional. But the mere blind *knowledge* of its presence gripped Vanaman's soul with a terror that far surpassed his previous fear. He felt that he was dying; no agony like this could be long endured by mere human life."

And later:

"What vast, mist-veiled shapes were those that loomed there?

"Buildings? Monumental outposts of some great harbor? But no land had been within fifty miles when they first came on Red Dolphin.

"And those buildings, if buildings they were, glittered even through the enshrouding mists with a vivid and ominous color.

"Scarlet they were, beyond doubt; scarlet as blood newly shed; scarlet as the writing that lay across what *he* claimed for his own."

If the proto-Lovecraft aspect attracts you, all to the good; but I think you'll wind up enjoying it on its own considerable merits. It's a suspenseful, gripping adventure yarn in the best sense of the word -- highly recommended!
Qucid
An island is raised up from the unplumbed depths of the ocean by volcanic activity. A passing ship explores the island, and the landscape strangely resembles ruins ... but surely that's just overactive imagination. Still, one of the crew brings back a keepsake, something that resembles a small box that won't open, inscribed in an unknown language. And before long, Something comes looking for that box ...

Sounds like prime HP Lovecraft, right?

Close, but wrong -- this solid story by Francis Stevens (born Gertrude Barrows Bennett) was reportedly read & praised by Lovecraft, and it preceded his classic "The Call of Cthulhu" by several years. It wouldn't surprise me in the least if it influenced that classic, too. Because this is very good dark fantasy writing indeed, by an author who deserves rediscovery by fans of the genre. And while it foreshadows Lovecraft, it has its own style & tone:

"And now Vanaman grew aware that with the green sea-tide something else had entered the room. He could not see it. The evidence of its presence was yet purely intuitional. But the mere blind *knowledge* of its presence gripped Vanaman's soul with a terror that far surpassed his previous fear. He felt that he was dying; no agony like this could be long endured by mere human life."

And later:

"What vast, mist-veiled shapes were those that loomed there?

"Buildings? Monumental outposts of some great harbor? But no land had been within fifty miles when they first came on Red Dolphin.

"And those buildings, if buildings they were, glittered even through the enshrouding mists with a vivid and ominous color.

"Scarlet they were, beyond doubt; scarlet as blood newly shed; scarlet as the writing that lay across what *he* claimed for his own."

If the proto-Lovecraft aspect attracts you, all to the good; but I think you'll wind up enjoying it on its own considerable merits. It's a suspenseful, gripping adventure yarn in the best sense of the word -- highly recommended!