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Human Amusements epub download

by Wayne Johnston


Wayne Johnston is a new-to-me author and I'm glad that I came across him. I thought that Human Amusements was both a fun and thought-provoking read.

Wayne Johnston is a new-to-me author and I'm glad that I came across him. The family dynamic in this novel was really.

I thought that Human Amusements was both a fun and thought-provoking read. Wayne Johnston is the author of The Story of Bobby O’Malley, The Time of Their Lives, The Divine Ryans, Human Amusements, The Colony of Unrequited Dreams – all novels – and of Baltimore’s Mansion, a memoir. He lives in Toronto where is presently working on his sixth novel.

Human Amusements book. Human Amusements is an exceptionally good book, one that is both riotously funny and melancholically humane.

Johnston’s genius for understated deadpan hilarity works wonderfully in reactive descriptions of Rumpus Room’s inane ly those spoken by Henry’s saturnine father Peter, a would-be serious novelist who maintains an amused distance from his wife’s busy conquest.

Johnston’s genius for understated deadpan hilarity works wonderfully in reactive descriptions of Rumpus Room’s inane ly those spoken by Henry’s saturnine father Peter, a would-be serious novelist who maintains an amused distance from his wife’s busy conquest of the upstart medium. I have my daughter, Jill, who's an avid Wayne Johnston fan, to thank for another good recommendation from this prolific, entertaining author. Johnston accurately captures the bittersweet nuances of a family's interactions with each other and the world around them as they experience a huge success in the field of television production.

leaves us nostalgic for a kinder, gentler, mediascape, and the life that went with it. . -The Toronto Star. Wayne Johnston’s books are beautifully written, among the funniest I’ve ever read, yet somehow at the same time among the most poignant and moving. This bittersweet novel touches the funny bone and the heart. The Edmonton Journal. Charles Dickens would have greatly admired Johnston’s style and humor–And the old master would have envied the vivid scenes Johnston draws.

Human amusements : a novel.

Wayne Johnston's breakthrough epic novel The Colony of Unrequited Dreams was published in several countries .

Wayne Johnston's breakthrough epic novel The Colony of Unrequited Dreams was published in several countries and given high praise from the critics. It earned him nominations for the highest fiction prizes in Canada and was a national bestseller. With The Custodian of Paradise, Wayne Johnston continues his masterful exploration of life in pre-Confederation Newfoundland, and of the powerful forces that give rise to great ism, circumstance, and secrecy; memory, loss, and regret. From Publishers Weekly.

Coming of age on TV. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 15 years ago. Canadian author Johnston forsakes his native Newfoundland for 1960s Toronto to tell a more urban story of growing up in the early heyday of television - from the inside. The narrator, Henry Pendergast, child star, watching reruns of himself on tape, looks back to a time before. My parents, in that other life, were teachers.

Book by JOHNSTON, Wayne

Human Amusements epub download

ISBN13: 978-0771044380

ISBN: 0771044380

Author: Wayne Johnston

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: McClelland & Stewart; First Edition edition (1994)

Pages: 296 pages

ePUB size: 1536 kb

FB2 size: 1286 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 285

Other Formats: azw lrf mobi docx

Related to Human Amusements ePub books

Mr.Twister
Canadian author Johnston forsakes his native Newfoundland for 1960s Toronto to tell a more urban story of growing up in the early heyday of television -- from the inside. The narrator, Henry Pendergast, child star, watching reruns of himself on tape, looks back to a time before.
'My parents, in that other life, were teachers.' Substitute teachers, that is, unable to get permanent jobs. His father, Peter, dreamed of having real time to devote to his novel; his mother, Audrey, churned out TV scripts, routinely rejected. In the evenings they all watched a black-and-white TV dubbed 'the Gillingham,' for the repairman whose frequent visits were essential to its operation. Until one day Mr. Gillingham put the picture tube back in upside down and it operated perfectly for so many years that shameless journalists, spying through windows, consumed lots of ink speculating on why Henry Pendergast had an upside down TV set in his room.
But I digress and get ahead of myself. As in many cautionary tales, the Pendergasts get their heart's desire. Audrey sells a children?s show, 'The Rumpus Room,' which becomes a smash hit, with her as the host, Miss Mary, and Henry as twin, silent, illustrative insects, Bee Good and Bee Bad. Peter goes on teaching for a while, but the money is pointless and the principle vague. Adamantly refusing to have anything to do with the show -- except watch it -- Peter labors on his novel, refusing to discuss it, much less let anyone see it.
Their lives disrupted by aggressive journalists, the Pendergasts move to a security-conscious condominium and Henry attends an uppercrust school. The condo was a compromise that pleased no one. Peter wanted to remain in their old neighborhood; Audrey wanted a secluded suburban estate. As their interests diverge, such wrangles increase. Peter digs in his heels, but Audrey, gentle, earnest, well meaning and focused, is a force of nature.
Audrey takes her work seriously. She regards TV as a powerful instrument for good or evil. 'Good TV would keep books from becoming obsolete, she said, but my father would say it was good books that would keep books from becoming obsolete.'
Eventually Henry gets a little old for the twin bees. Audrey develops a new show about the young Philo Farnsworth, the inventor of television. The network likes it, with some minor changes that remove it from the realm of truth or history, and the show becomes a cult hit, with Henry in the title role.
But if Audrey has success, her husband has all the humor - a quality that any fan of Johnston's knows is essential for a balanced life. Audrey, poor thing, has no sense of humor at all (I did wonder, from time to time, how they ever got together in the first place). Even at its most lighthearted, Peter?s humor has an edge, but as the rift grows wider, Peter's wit becomes a weapon. Audrey gets the sentiment if not the sense, but Henry's understanding inevitably becomes complicitous.
Henry has inherited his father's humor and his mother's desire for family harmony and happiness, a warring combination. He spends a lot of time in his darkened room watching the Gillingham. His understanding of his parents' motives has undergone the dissection of reflection and in this mood he feels compassion for both, as well as a more pitiless understanding.
His own life has been shaped by celebrity. Harassed by journalists, he is virtually a prisoner, with no friends and no activities outside of acting and watching television. He is also becoming a teenager and begins to envision himself as something more than Mom's protege, as something more than Philo Farnsworth, nerd hero. The story builds to a cataclysm of good intentions, rebellion and rejection.
Johnston's ('The Colony of Unrequited Dreams,' 'The Divine Ryans') funny, poignant book is a story of growing up as an icon of popular culture, who is simultaneously a lonely unselfconfident boy. It's an exploration of one man coping with his wife?s runaway success. It's a look at the early upswell of television, with its naivety and burgeoning cynicism and it's a running commentary (mostly from Peter) on mass popular culture. It's a sharp and moving novel.
Mr.Twister
Canadian author Johnston forsakes his native Newfoundland for 1960s Toronto to tell a more urban story of growing up in the early heyday of television -- from the inside. The narrator, Henry Pendergast, child star, watching reruns of himself on tape, looks back to a time before.
'My parents, in that other life, were teachers.' Substitute teachers, that is, unable to get permanent jobs. His father, Peter, dreamed of having real time to devote to his novel; his mother, Audrey, churned out TV scripts, routinely rejected. In the evenings they all watched a black-and-white TV dubbed 'the Gillingham,' for the repairman whose frequent visits were essential to its operation. Until one day Mr. Gillingham put the picture tube back in upside down and it operated perfectly for so many years that shameless journalists, spying through windows, consumed lots of ink speculating on why Henry Pendergast had an upside down TV set in his room.
But I digress and get ahead of myself. As in many cautionary tales, the Pendergasts get their heart's desire. Audrey sells a children?s show, 'The Rumpus Room,' which becomes a smash hit, with her as the host, Miss Mary, and Henry as twin, silent, illustrative insects, Bee Good and Bee Bad. Peter goes on teaching for a while, but the money is pointless and the principle vague. Adamantly refusing to have anything to do with the show -- except watch it -- Peter labors on his novel, refusing to discuss it, much less let anyone see it.
Their lives disrupted by aggressive journalists, the Pendergasts move to a security-conscious condominium and Henry attends an uppercrust school. The condo was a compromise that pleased no one. Peter wanted to remain in their old neighborhood; Audrey wanted a secluded suburban estate. As their interests diverge, such wrangles increase. Peter digs in his heels, but Audrey, gentle, earnest, well meaning and focused, is a force of nature.
Audrey takes her work seriously. She regards TV as a powerful instrument for good or evil. 'Good TV would keep books from becoming obsolete, she said, but my father would say it was good books that would keep books from becoming obsolete.'
Eventually Henry gets a little old for the twin bees. Audrey develops a new show about the young Philo Farnsworth, the inventor of television. The network likes it, with some minor changes that remove it from the realm of truth or history, and the show becomes a cult hit, with Henry in the title role.
But if Audrey has success, her husband has all the humor - a quality that any fan of Johnston's knows is essential for a balanced life. Audrey, poor thing, has no sense of humor at all (I did wonder, from time to time, how they ever got together in the first place). Even at its most lighthearted, Peter?s humor has an edge, but as the rift grows wider, Peter's wit becomes a weapon. Audrey gets the sentiment if not the sense, but Henry's understanding inevitably becomes complicitous.
Henry has inherited his father's humor and his mother's desire for family harmony and happiness, a warring combination. He spends a lot of time in his darkened room watching the Gillingham. His understanding of his parents' motives has undergone the dissection of reflection and in this mood he feels compassion for both, as well as a more pitiless understanding.
His own life has been shaped by celebrity. Harassed by journalists, he is virtually a prisoner, with no friends and no activities outside of acting and watching television. He is also becoming a teenager and begins to envision himself as something more than Mom's protege, as something more than Philo Farnsworth, nerd hero. The story builds to a cataclysm of good intentions, rebellion and rejection.
Johnston's ('The Colony of Unrequited Dreams,' 'The Divine Ryans') funny, poignant book is a story of growing up as an icon of popular culture, who is simultaneously a lonely unselfconfident boy. It's an exploration of one man coping with his wife?s runaway success. It's a look at the early upswell of television, with its naivety and burgeoning cynicism and it's a running commentary (mostly from Peter) on mass popular culture. It's a sharp and moving novel.
Ballardana
This book will get you thinking a lot about television and the celebrities it creates. I personally think the author had his tongue in his cheek the whole time -- the whole business of the show about Philo, the kid who invented television, and the emergence of the fanatical Philosophers fan group following the show -- was absolutely silly. And yet...maybe that was the author's commentary on television celebrity...a show doesn't have to be really good, or interesting, and people will still become obsessed with it and the actors who star in it. Ridiculous? Indeed.

Anyway, to me the best part about the book were the hilarious comments from the father, who disapproved of the TV thing the whole time. When he went away for a while, the story fell very flat. The author obviously knew what he was doing to write the story that way, and it communicated his message effectively.

This is not this author's best work (The Colony of Unrequited Dreams is much better) but it is not bad.
Ballardana
This book will get you thinking a lot about television and the celebrities it creates. I personally think the author had his tongue in his cheek the whole time -- the whole business of the show about Philo, the kid who invented television, and the emergence of the fanatical Philosophers fan group following the show -- was absolutely silly. And yet...maybe that was the author's commentary on television celebrity...a show doesn't have to be really good, or interesting, and people will still become obsessed with it and the actors who star in it. Ridiculous? Indeed.

Anyway, to me the best part about the book were the hilarious comments from the father, who disapproved of the TV thing the whole time. When he went away for a while, the story fell very flat. The author obviously knew what he was doing to write the story that way, and it communicated his message effectively.

This is not this author's best work (The Colony of Unrequited Dreams is much better) but it is not bad.
Wanenai
This is a compelling story of how fame affects a very nuclear family. A mother and young son start a children's television show, and when the boy becomes a teenager he stars in his own series which develops a huge cult-like fan base. It has another great father character (typical of Johnston's books) who tries to realize his own dreams. But the more nerdy mother who literally and figuratively runs the show is another unforgettable character, and a study in how good intentions can do more damage than good. And the son is realistically written as being torn between what he wants for his father, his mother and himself. The fanatic following of the family's fame is at times over the top, but the real story is what goes on inside their increasingly secluded home.
Wanenai
This is a compelling story of how fame affects a very nuclear family. A mother and young son start a children's television show, and when the boy becomes a teenager he stars in his own series which develops a huge cult-like fan base. It has another great father character (typical of Johnston's books) who tries to realize his own dreams. But the more nerdy mother who literally and figuratively runs the show is another unforgettable character, and a study in how good intentions can do more damage than good. And the son is realistically written as being torn between what he wants for his father, his mother and himself. The fanatic following of the family's fame is at times over the top, but the real story is what goes on inside their increasingly secluded home.