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by Elizabeth George


Home Elizabeth George A Great Deliverance. Files and photographs and reports and books covered every surface. There were empty coffee cups and overfull ashtrays and even a pair of ancient running shoes high on a shelf.

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Elizabeth George A Great Deliverance The first book in the Inspector Lynley series, 19881 It was a solecism of the very worst kind. He sneezed loudly, wetly, and quite unforgivably into the woman’s face

Elizabeth George A Great Deliverance The first book in the Inspector Lynley series, 19881 It was a solecism of the very worst kind. He sneezed loudly, wetly, and quite unforgivably into the woman’s face. He’d been holding it back for three-quarters of an hour, fighting it off as if it were Henry Tudor’s vanguard in the Battle of Bosworth. But at last he’d surrendered. And after the act, to make matters worse, he im.

A Great Deliverance book. George also has a great facility for moving quickly from one venue/character to another while always assuring the reader does not lose the thread of the story. This avoids ever having scenes which are too long. We are always dealing with a fresh aspect of the story.

Elizabeth George is the New York Times bestselling author of fourteen novels of psychological suspense, one book of nonfiction, and two short-story collections. Her work has been honored with the Anthony and Agatha awards, the Grand Prix de LittÉrature PoliciÈre, and the MIMI, Germany's prestigious prize for suspense fiction.

A Great Deliverance (. ISBN 978-0-553-27802-6) is a book written by Elizabeth George and published by Bantam Books (now owned by Random House). ISBN 978-0-553-27802-6) is a book written by Elizabeth George and published by Bantam Books (now owned by Random House) on 1 May 1988 which later went on to win the Anthony Award for Best First Novel in 1989.

Elizabeth George’s first novel, A Great Deliverance, was honored with the Anthony and Agatha Best First Novel Awards and received the Grand Prix de Littérature Policière. Her third novel, Well-Schooled in Murder, was awarded the prestigious German prize for suspense fiction, the MIMI. A Suitable Vengeance, For the Sake of Elena, Missing Joseph, Playing for the Ashes, In the Presence of the Enemy, Deception on His Mind, In Pursuit of the Proper Sinner, A Traitor to Memory, and I, Richard were international bestsellers. Elizabeth George divides her time between Huntington Beach, California, and.

I am grateful to the people who have read and criticised the rough drafts of all my work: Sheila Hillinger, Julie Mayer, Paul Berger, Susan Berner, Steve Mitchell, and Cathy Stephany.

I am grateful to the people who have read and criticised the rough drafts of all my work: Sheila Hillinger, Julie Mayer, Paul Berger, Susan Berner, Steve Mitchell, and Cathy Stephany parents and husband for their patience and support, Dr. H. M. Upton for his generous input, and especially Deborah Schneider and Kate Miciak for their willingness to take a chance on someone unknown. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

The first novel in the Inspector Lynley mystery series. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

A Great Deliverance epub download

ISBN13: 978-0553813920

ISBN: 0553813927

Author: Elizabeth George

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Bantam Books Ltd; New Ed edition (1900)

Pages: 336 pages

ePUB size: 1541 kb

FB2 size: 1351 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 879

Other Formats: lrf lit doc rtf

Related to A Great Deliverance ePub books

Xarcondre
As an avid reader of mystery series, why have I never picked up one of Elizabeth George's Inspector Lynley books? After all, she's one of the most successful mystery writers now on the scene. I've finally remedied my oversight by reading the first book in the series and the writer's first novel, A Great Deliverance. I won't wait so long to peruse the second book in the series, because this was a terrific read.

Here are a few of the things that I liked about the book:

The setting. Yorkshire, with its gray, windy moors and small, insular villages is a dark and mysterious place all on its own. Here, George takes us to the little village of Keldale where a local respected farmer has been found decapitated in his barn, his dead body slumped over the also dead body of his old dog whose throat had been slit. Most shockingly, his daughter is seated on an upturned bucket nearby with an axe on her lap. She says, "I did it. And I'm not sorry." Okay, end of mystery, right? No! It is only the beginning.

The development of character. The two main characters are Inspector Thomas Lynley, who is also a member of the aristocracy as the eighth earl of Asherton, and Sergeant Barbara Havers, who is definitely blue collar and it's not just the color of her uniform. She was raised and still lives in poverty with her parents.

I was fascinated with the way that George chose to reveal these characters to us. She essentially shows us both through the eyes of Sgt. Havers who is an embittered and unhappy woman. Havers has just been demoted from detective back to a uniform policewoman because she is so irascible and ill-tempered that she is unable to work with any of the inspectors. Then the head of a Scotland Yard unit gives her a second chance. He picks her to work with Inspector Lynley on the decapitation case. Havers is both elated and appalled. Appalled because it's Lynley. She hates Lynley! She sees him as an upper class twit, a fop, and, moreover, a relentless womanizer who seduces every attractive woman he meets. Which means that Havers is perfectly safe because her image of her own body (like that of so many women who have been taught to be self-loathers) is that she is ugly, pig-like even, a perennial loser. Donald Trump would have a field day mocking her.

The problem with Havers' perception of Lynley's personality is that it is her own projection. His reputation as being a carefree sex machine is more than a little overblown. As we eventually learn, he has actually been celibate for the past year since breaking off his engagement with the woman he loved. The woman he still loves. The woman who has just married one of Lynley's best friends, a man about whom he feels enormous guilt because his friend was crippled as a result of an auto accident when Lynley was driving. In fact, we learn through Lynley's actions that he is actually a caring and sensitive man and a detective who is passionate about his job. But will Havers ever be able to see that?

Plot surprises. George plays fair. She sprinkles her clues throughout and the eagle-eyed reader may certainly suspect what is at the bottom of the secrets and mysteries that are buried in the village of Keldale. Still the denouement is pretty devastating as all the secrets are finally revealed.

Language. The writer is able to weave in literary and historical elements into her story. Her use of Shakespearean allusions seemed particularly apt. But I was especially pleased with some of the $25 words used by George, words that I was unfamiliar with and had to ask my Kindle to define. Such a joy to learn new-to-me words, although most often the words themselves were quite old.

Relationships. I found the development of the prickly relationship between Lynley and Havers fascinating to watch. These are two very damaged people. One can hope that the strengths of one will offset the weaknesses of the other. That's what their boss at Scotland Yard saw and what he is hoping for.

There are other important relationships that play a role in the plot. For example, the ones between that dead farmer and his two daughters and the wife who left long ago, as well as his relationships in the community. Other tangential relationships are sketched by George with a minimum of words that are nevertheless cogent and well-chosen and give the reader a clear picture of the situation.

By the way, was that impish nine-year-old girl with her pet duck an homage to Martha Grimes? I choose to think so!

All in all, I found this to be a remarkable first novel by a talented writer, and I look forward to reading more about Lynley and Havers.
Xarcondre
As an avid reader of mystery series, why have I never picked up one of Elizabeth George's Inspector Lynley books? After all, she's one of the most successful mystery writers now on the scene. I've finally remedied my oversight by reading the first book in the series and the writer's first novel, A Great Deliverance. I won't wait so long to peruse the second book in the series, because this was a terrific read.

Here are a few of the things that I liked about the book:

The setting. Yorkshire, with its gray, windy moors and small, insular villages is a dark and mysterious place all on its own. Here, George takes us to the little village of Keldale where a local respected farmer has been found decapitated in his barn, his dead body slumped over the also dead body of his old dog whose throat had been slit. Most shockingly, his daughter is seated on an upturned bucket nearby with an axe on her lap. She says, "I did it. And I'm not sorry." Okay, end of mystery, right? No! It is only the beginning.

The development of character. The two main characters are Inspector Thomas Lynley, who is also a member of the aristocracy as the eighth earl of Asherton, and Sergeant Barbara Havers, who is definitely blue collar and it's not just the color of her uniform. She was raised and still lives in poverty with her parents.

I was fascinated with the way that George chose to reveal these characters to us. She essentially shows us both through the eyes of Sgt. Havers who is an embittered and unhappy woman. Havers has just been demoted from detective back to a uniform policewoman because she is so irascible and ill-tempered that she is unable to work with any of the inspectors. Then the head of a Scotland Yard unit gives her a second chance. He picks her to work with Inspector Lynley on the decapitation case. Havers is both elated and appalled. Appalled because it's Lynley. She hates Lynley! She sees him as an upper class twit, a fop, and, moreover, a relentless womanizer who seduces every attractive woman he meets. Which means that Havers is perfectly safe because her image of her own body (like that of so many women who have been taught to be self-loathers) is that she is ugly, pig-like even, a perennial loser. Donald Trump would have a field day mocking her.

The problem with Havers' perception of Lynley's personality is that it is her own projection. His reputation as being a carefree sex machine is more than a little overblown. As we eventually learn, he has actually been celibate for the past year since breaking off his engagement with the woman he loved. The woman he still loves. The woman who has just married one of Lynley's best friends, a man about whom he feels enormous guilt because his friend was crippled as a result of an auto accident when Lynley was driving. In fact, we learn through Lynley's actions that he is actually a caring and sensitive man and a detective who is passionate about his job. But will Havers ever be able to see that?

Plot surprises. George plays fair. She sprinkles her clues throughout and the eagle-eyed reader may certainly suspect what is at the bottom of the secrets and mysteries that are buried in the village of Keldale. Still the denouement is pretty devastating as all the secrets are finally revealed.

Language. The writer is able to weave in literary and historical elements into her story. Her use of Shakespearean allusions seemed particularly apt. But I was especially pleased with some of the $25 words used by George, words that I was unfamiliar with and had to ask my Kindle to define. Such a joy to learn new-to-me words, although most often the words themselves were quite old.

Relationships. I found the development of the prickly relationship between Lynley and Havers fascinating to watch. These are two very damaged people. One can hope that the strengths of one will offset the weaknesses of the other. That's what their boss at Scotland Yard saw and what he is hoping for.

There are other important relationships that play a role in the plot. For example, the ones between that dead farmer and his two daughters and the wife who left long ago, as well as his relationships in the community. Other tangential relationships are sketched by George with a minimum of words that are nevertheless cogent and well-chosen and give the reader a clear picture of the situation.

By the way, was that impish nine-year-old girl with her pet duck an homage to Martha Grimes? I choose to think so!

All in all, I found this to be a remarkable first novel by a talented writer, and I look forward to reading more about Lynley and Havers.
Charyoll
This is a novel that had been sitting on my tbr list for some time. Though the idea of picking it up really peaked my interest, I think the fact that a number of books in the series are quite long put me off. Since I’m retired, I finally figured if I was ever going to read long books, now’s the time.

This is a terrific British tale, surprisingly written by an American author. Elizabeth George is a wonderful writer. Her prose is reminiscent of old-time British writing, though not as stilted. Every page or so contains a word I was unfamiliar with, and I loved using the kindle dictionary to learn the definitions. I really didn’t find this to be a flow-breaker as the book moves along at a relatively leisurely pace as it is; furthermore, many of these words have meanings that are clear in the context they are used, so one really doesn’t need a dictionary to understand the content.

Characterization is outstanding. Our protagonist, Scotland Yard Inspector Thomas Lynley, is also the eighth earl of Asherton. He is newly paired with Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers who has difficulty getting along with others and low self esteem. As they pair up in an effort to discover the truth about a number of unfortunate occurrences in rural England, we learn their fascinating back stories and see them attempt to form some sort of working relationship. This tale has a large cast. I did have a bit of trouble remembering who was who, so was happy I was reading on the kindle with its helpful “search” button.

The author has a real handle on delivering imagery to the reader. I feel like I grasped a true sense of the British countryside in this novel.

The plot is captivating. There are quite a few threads and threadlets to keep track of, but all came together beautifully at the end. I would, however, have liked the pace of the final revelations to have been slower so that I could better savor the unraveling of the puzzles.

Ms. George makes liberal use of Shakespearian references. This will be a delight for Shakespeare lovers. Alas, I have never been much of a fan of his so feel I missed out a bit here.

I found A Great Deliverance engaging enough to continue on with the series. In fact, if not for a ridiculously late spring blizzard, I would have immediately trekked down to the library for a copy of book 2. Oh well, that will be a book I can look forward to on another day. I highly recommend A Great Deliverance to all lovers of British crime stories with great characterization and sense of place.
Charyoll
This is a novel that had been sitting on my tbr list for some time. Though the idea of picking it up really peaked my interest, I think the fact that a number of books in the series are quite long put me off. Since I’m retired, I finally figured if I was ever going to read long books, now’s the time.

This is a terrific British tale, surprisingly written by an American author. Elizabeth George is a wonderful writer. Her prose is reminiscent of old-time British writing, though not as stilted. Every page or so contains a word I was unfamiliar with, and I loved using the kindle dictionary to learn the definitions. I really didn’t find this to be a flow-breaker as the book moves along at a relatively leisurely pace as it is; furthermore, many of these words have meanings that are clear in the context they are used, so one really doesn’t need a dictionary to understand the content.

Characterization is outstanding. Our protagonist, Scotland Yard Inspector Thomas Lynley, is also the eighth earl of Asherton. He is newly paired with Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers who has difficulty getting along with others and low self esteem. As they pair up in an effort to discover the truth about a number of unfortunate occurrences in rural England, we learn their fascinating back stories and see them attempt to form some sort of working relationship. This tale has a large cast. I did have a bit of trouble remembering who was who, so was happy I was reading on the kindle with its helpful “search” button.

The author has a real handle on delivering imagery to the reader. I feel like I grasped a true sense of the British countryside in this novel.

The plot is captivating. There are quite a few threads and threadlets to keep track of, but all came together beautifully at the end. I would, however, have liked the pace of the final revelations to have been slower so that I could better savor the unraveling of the puzzles.

Ms. George makes liberal use of Shakespearian references. This will be a delight for Shakespeare lovers. Alas, I have never been much of a fan of his so feel I missed out a bit here.

I found A Great Deliverance engaging enough to continue on with the series. In fact, if not for a ridiculously late spring blizzard, I would have immediately trekked down to the library for a copy of book 2. Oh well, that will be a book I can look forward to on another day. I highly recommend A Great Deliverance to all lovers of British crime stories with great characterization and sense of place.
White_Nigga
A GREAT DELIVERANCE, Elizabeth George, 1988
In the first of the Inspector Lynley mystery books, we meet Inspector Thomas Lynley (an English Earl who works with Scotland Yard), Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers, Simon Allcourt-St. James (an independent forensic scientist), Lady Helen Clyde (assistant to St. James), and Deborah St. James (recently married to Simon St. James) and a few other people who will appear in later books.
In this story, William Tey is beheaded and Whisper, the family dog is killed in a barn in Keldale, Yorkshire. Allegedly, his daughter, Roberta, killed both of them. Scotland Yard has been called in to investigate.
I think one of the reasons I like the Inspector Lynley mysteries is they take place in Yorkshire, a part of England I am drawn to. Also, Ms. George’s descriptions of the characters, the landscape, and the conversations are so well drawn.
White_Nigga
A GREAT DELIVERANCE, Elizabeth George, 1988
In the first of the Inspector Lynley mystery books, we meet Inspector Thomas Lynley (an English Earl who works with Scotland Yard), Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers, Simon Allcourt-St. James (an independent forensic scientist), Lady Helen Clyde (assistant to St. James), and Deborah St. James (recently married to Simon St. James) and a few other people who will appear in later books.
In this story, William Tey is beheaded and Whisper, the family dog is killed in a barn in Keldale, Yorkshire. Allegedly, his daughter, Roberta, killed both of them. Scotland Yard has been called in to investigate.
I think one of the reasons I like the Inspector Lynley mysteries is they take place in Yorkshire, a part of England I am drawn to. Also, Ms. George’s descriptions of the characters, the landscape, and the conversations are so well drawn.