» » The Monkey King

The Monkey King epub download

by Timothy Mo


The Monkey King is the debut novel of Timothy Mo, originally published in London in 1978 by André Deutsch.

The Monkey King is the debut novel of Timothy Mo, originally published in London in 1978 by André Deutsch. It was subsequently released through other UK and US publishers – including Faber & Faber (paperback 1978), HarperCollins (hardcover 1978), Random House/Doubleday hardcover (1980), Vintage (softcover, 1993) – before being self-published by the author under the Paddleless Press imprint in 2000

The Monkey King book. The only book I've read by TImothy Mo was The Redundancy of Courage, about the war and conflict in East Timor

The Monkey King book. The only book I've read by TImothy Mo was The Redundancy of Courage, about the war and conflict in East Timor. So I was not at all prepared for this viciously funny look at family life in Hong Kong. I loved the deadpan non-judgemental writing, and the depiction of the family - in all their pragmatism, cruelty, obedience, fear, small rebellions - was perfectly caught.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Monkey King (abacus Books) by Timothy .

item 6 (Very Good)-The Monkey King (Abacus Books) (Paperback)-Mo, Timothy-0349123934 -(Very Good)-The Monkey King (Abacus Books) (Paperback)-Mo, Timothy-0349123934.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

com User, November 8, 1999. This story of a Cantonese family in Hong Kong is filled with warmth and humor. It tracks the relationship between Wallace, a clever young man of descent, and the family's shrewd, miserly, tyrannical patriarch. Perhaps it's a bit of a fairy tale that works out too smoothly in the end.

Used availability for Timothy Mo's The Monkey King. January 1989 : USA Hardback.

3 people like this topic.

The Monkey King is the first published novel of Timothy Mo; it has previously been released through several US- and UK-based printers before becoming self-published by Mo via Paddleless Press: Faber & Faber (paperback 1978), HarperCollins (hardco.

The Monkey King is the first published novel of Timothy Mo; it has previously been released through several US- and UK-based printers before becoming self-published by Mo via Paddleless Press: Faber & Faber (paperback 1978), HarperCollins (hardcover 1978), Random House/Doubleday hardcover (1980), Vintage (softcover, 1993), Paddleless Press (hardcover and softcover, 2000). It was subsequently released through other UK and US publishers – including Faber & Faber, HarperCollins, Random House/Doubleday hardcover, Vintage – before being self-published by the author under the Paddleless Press imprint in 2000

The Poons, according to gossip in post-war Hong Kong, have plenty of money. But when Wallace Nolasco marries May Ling, daughter of the house of Poon, he finds he has been sold short. Wallace is relegated to the bottom of the household pecking order. By the author of "Sour Sweet".

The Monkey King epub download

ISBN13: 978-0952419372

ISBN: 0952419378

Author: Timothy Mo

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Paddleless Press (September 30, 2000)

Pages: 259 pages

ePUB size: 1866 kb

FB2 size: 1764 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 373

Other Formats: doc lit txt rtf

Related to The Monkey King ePub books

Ral
I am not going to relate what is in the book - there are enough descripitons of it's contents - and I am not going to analyse it. I only wanted to write, that I could not put the book down. It is a great read!
Ral
I am not going to relate what is in the book - there are enough descripitons of it's contents - and I am not going to analyse it. I only wanted to write, that I could not put the book down. It is a great read!
Iriar
Several times i laughed out loud. It wasn't a comfortable laughter, though, because all people in this Hongkong-Chinese family novel (with a mild outsider as main actor) are unsympathetic - just everyone. Mo also makes them talk a Pidgin English that feels degenerate in written form. Anyway it is nice to observe family life. In the books first half nothing much goes on; if a household member dies, the problem is calmly approached with some cerenomy and less emotion.

There are interesting, mildly bizarre intercultural encounters, seen with Chinese eyes. Side figures bear cute names such as Mabel Yip or Pippy da Souza - you gotta love it. The novel is clearly split in several parts: town - village - back to town. The second half has a few weird ongoings which probably only Chinese or old Hongkong hands will fully treasure.

Mo English sounds energetic, erudite and non-judgementally sarcastic, I found his tone rather gripping. To me as a non-native English reader, he is certainly more difficult than say Naipaul or Theroux; but he's never dull.

The Hongkong novels I liked most so far are Suzie Wong and Kowloon Tong - both written from a westerners point of view. Not bad I thought was A Many Splendoured Thing, with a more Chinese angle.
Iriar
Several times i laughed out loud. It wasn't a comfortable laughter, though, because all people in this Hongkong-Chinese family novel (with a mild outsider as main actor) are unsympathetic - just everyone. Mo also makes them talk a Pidgin English that feels degenerate in written form. Anyway it is nice to observe family life. In the books first half nothing much goes on; if a household member dies, the problem is calmly approached with some cerenomy and less emotion.

There are interesting, mildly bizarre intercultural encounters, seen with Chinese eyes. Side figures bear cute names such as Mabel Yip or Pippy da Souza - you gotta love it. The novel is clearly split in several parts: town - village - back to town. The second half has a few weird ongoings which probably only Chinese or old Hongkong hands will fully treasure.

Mo English sounds energetic, erudite and non-judgementally sarcastic, I found his tone rather gripping. To me as a non-native English reader, he is certainly more difficult than say Naipaul or Theroux; but he's never dull.

The Hongkong novels I liked most so far are Suzie Wong and Kowloon Tong - both written from a westerners point of view. Not bad I thought was A Many Splendoured Thing, with a more Chinese angle.
Malien
Timothy Mo's first novel is a blisteringly funny account of the misadventures of Wallace Nolasco, a Macau native who marries into a wickedly dysfunctional Cantonese merchant's family. Set in an evocatively depicted 1950s Hong Kong, this book is a devastatingly funny account of Chinese culture and family life. In many ways it remains acccurate even today.
The Monkey King contains many many wonderful insights into colonialism, Confucianism and family politics. This is a humane, arch and beautifully-written piece of social and human analysis blended with touches of whimsy and magical realism.
Like Sun Wu Kong the famous Monkey King of "Journey to the West", Wallace uses his brains, sleight of hand and force of imagination to eventually pull success from the jaws of failure. However, the disturbing ending of the book points to deeper and darker forces at work within this sunny and good-humored tale.
Some people may have a problem with the "dialect" that Mo has his Cantonese-speaking characters use when they are speaking "Chinglish", personally I think it's a marvellous use of an artistic convention to confront speakers of standard English with the fact that local dialect adaptations of English (not elite-sanctioned text-book varieties) are the standard method of communication in many different places.
Despite the official pronouncements, this book is actually alive and well and available through the UK Amazon site. It is published by Mo's own Paddleless Press which he set up in 1995 after he sacked Random House as his publisher.
Malien
Timothy Mo's first novel is a blisteringly funny account of the misadventures of Wallace Nolasco, a Macau native who marries into a wickedly dysfunctional Cantonese merchant's family. Set in an evocatively depicted 1950s Hong Kong, this book is a devastatingly funny account of Chinese culture and family life. In many ways it remains acccurate even today.
The Monkey King contains many many wonderful insights into colonialism, Confucianism and family politics. This is a humane, arch and beautifully-written piece of social and human analysis blended with touches of whimsy and magical realism.
Like Sun Wu Kong the famous Monkey King of "Journey to the West", Wallace uses his brains, sleight of hand and force of imagination to eventually pull success from the jaws of failure. However, the disturbing ending of the book points to deeper and darker forces at work within this sunny and good-humored tale.
Some people may have a problem with the "dialect" that Mo has his Cantonese-speaking characters use when they are speaking "Chinglish", personally I think it's a marvellous use of an artistic convention to confront speakers of standard English with the fact that local dialect adaptations of English (not elite-sanctioned text-book varieties) are the standard method of communication in many different places.
Despite the official pronouncements, this book is actually alive and well and available through the UK Amazon site. It is published by Mo's own Paddleless Press which he set up in 1995 after he sacked Random House as his publisher.
Bort
I wanted to like this book because of its connection to Hong Kong and Chinese gangs which are of interest to me. But i found many of the passages dealing with the gangsters to be rather unconvincing,
Bort
I wanted to like this book because of its connection to Hong Kong and Chinese gangs which are of interest to me. But i found many of the passages dealing with the gangsters to be rather unconvincing,