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by Iris Murdoch


This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher’s prior consent in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser. In a little scene towards the beginning of The Nice and the Good a young adolescent boy makes a doomed gesture of love to a young adolescent girl

Murdoch illustrates the concepts of nice and good in a very humorous and witty manner.

Murdoch illustrates the concepts of nice and good in a very humorous and witty manner. I don’t remember the exact plotline from A Midsummer Night's Dream, but while reading this book, I constantly thought of it, although I don’t think there are other connections between the two works of literature other than the humorous tone maybe (I have not investigated this further to see whether or not I am right). Alongside the investigatory part of the book is a typical Iris Murdoch large country home, inhabited this time by a ‘harem’ of women and their children, a gay Uncle, occasional visitors and, in a cottage on the grounds, a refugee from Dachau concentration camp.

Iris Murdoch (1919–1999) was born in Dublin and brought up in London. This novel is the most philosophical writing of Iris; according to the Socratic quest for the good man ('What is a good man like?) the better character, who try to fix this question is Ducane and his moralistic problems. She studied philosophy at Cambridge and was a philosophy fellow at St. Anne's College for 20 years. She published her first novel in 1954 and was instantly recognized as a major talent. What is morality? are we able to be impartial? if not we need of God or we must be good?

As macabre as Jacobean tragedy, as frivolous as Restoration comedy, Iris Murdoch's fifth novel takes sombre themes – adultery, incest, castration, violence and suicide – and yet succeeds in making of them a book that is brilliantly enjoyable. 73. The Italian Girl.

As macabre as Jacobean tragedy, as frivolous as Restoration comedy, Iris Murdoch's fifth novel takes sombre themes – adultery, incest, castration, violence and suicide – and yet succeeds in making of them a book that is brilliantly enjoyable. Настройки: Arial Century Courier Georgia Tahoma Verdana Times New Roman.

He breathed deeply a little to see his face. They might find my fingerprints on it!' 'Thanks, but I'd better stay myself. Poor devil, I wonder why he did i. 'I don't know. You remember, that terrible accident last year ' 'Yes,' said Biranne. He laughed his high-pitched little laugh, like an animal's yelp. Isn't it just like Radeechy's damn bad taste to go and shoot himself in the office!' 'Kate, darling. Octavian was on the telephone to his wife in Dorset. Are you all right?' 'I'm fine,' said Octavian, 'but something's happened in the office and I won't be able to get down till tomorrow morning.

The Nice and the Good

The Nice and the Good. Author: Айрис Мердок. Publication date: 1968. First published in 1968. To Rachel and David Cecil1. As macabre as Jacobean tragedy, as frivolous as Restoration comedy, Iris Murdoch's fifth novel takes sombre themes – adultery, incest, castration, violence and suicide – and yet succeeds in making of them a book that is brilliantly enjoyable.

was much as she had expected. Theo was sitting up in bed looking rather sheepish, holding Mingo in his arms. Casie was crying, and trying to extract a handkerchief from her knickers. Theo’s tea tray lay upon the floor with a mess, partly on it and partly round about it, of broken crockery, scattered bread and butter, and shattered cake.

Iris Murdoch's novels have always been noted for their ntelligent, witty observation of character and place

Iris Murdoch's novels have always been noted for their ntelligent, witty observation of character and place. Under the Net, her first novel, about a struggling young writer at large in London, she showed too a brilliant ]air for fast-paced comedy. The Flight from the Enchanter in her second novel, Iris Murdoch strikes a delicate, alance between absurdity and tragedy, between –ealism and fantasy. In the opinion of many devotees his is her most entrancing novel.

Nice and the Good epub download

ISBN13: 978-0701138646

ISBN: 0701138645

Author: Iris Murdoch

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Chatto and Windus; New Ed edition (August 8, 1991)

Pages: 350 pages

ePUB size: 1750 kb

FB2 size: 1376 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 936

Other Formats: mbr lrf lrf doc

Related to Nice and the Good ePub books

Jogas
I had once before tried to read a book by Iris Murdoch, as everyone insisted that she was so good, but was totally unable to get into it - to the extent that I can't even remember the title of the book. I had rejected Murdoch, based on this experience - some authors you just don't connect with. However, the time of life that one is at may play a part in what appeals; I don't know. How e'er it is, this book was decided upon by my book club, so I reluctantly started reading it - and found that I was eating it up! The theme of the lives of eccentric upper class English people in the middle of the last century is certainly rather trivial, but these weird characters become quite fascinating. I suspect I will be giving Murdoch more chances in the future.
Jogas
I had once before tried to read a book by Iris Murdoch, as everyone insisted that she was so good, but was totally unable to get into it - to the extent that I can't even remember the title of the book. I had rejected Murdoch, based on this experience - some authors you just don't connect with. However, the time of life that one is at may play a part in what appeals; I don't know. How e'er it is, this book was decided upon by my book club, so I reluctantly started reading it - and found that I was eating it up! The theme of the lives of eccentric upper class English people in the middle of the last century is certainly rather trivial, but these weird characters become quite fascinating. I suspect I will be giving Murdoch more chances in the future.
Steep
It's been years since I've read anything by Iris Murdoch. She's always been one of my favorite authors. Maybe because I haven't been reading anyone as cerebral as she is in a while, nor anyone who uses internal monologue and analysis so intensively, but for the first half of the book I kept thinking "these people really need to get over themselves." Eventually I got into more of a "Murdoch mood" and began enjoying the book, if not the characters, a great deal more. I didn't consider this to be remotely close to her best work, but any book by her is better than most.
Steep
It's been years since I've read anything by Iris Murdoch. She's always been one of my favorite authors. Maybe because I haven't been reading anyone as cerebral as she is in a while, nor anyone who uses internal monologue and analysis so intensively, but for the first half of the book I kept thinking "these people really need to get over themselves." Eventually I got into more of a "Murdoch mood" and began enjoying the book, if not the characters, a great deal more. I didn't consider this to be remotely close to her best work, but any book by her is better than most.
Manris
In the early part of this marvelous book is the best treatment of a widow's grief I have ever read. This is one of Murdoch's most enjoyable books to read ,for she understands and relates the human condition of the many layers of love,with much less of her philosophy than in others. It is,however, not nearly as profound as " The Sea, The Sea" ot "Message From The Planet", both of which I highly recommend.
Manris
In the early part of this marvelous book is the best treatment of a widow's grief I have ever read. This is one of Murdoch's most enjoyable books to read ,for she understands and relates the human condition of the many layers of love,with much less of her philosophy than in others. It is,however, not nearly as profound as " The Sea, The Sea" ot "Message From The Planet", both of which I highly recommend.
Ironrunner
This book has it all.

John Ducane, a man both nice and good, navigates through a languid swirl of blackmail, love, black magic, and lust, in the course of his investigation of an apparent suicide in a government office. As he goes about this quest, the mundane is juxtaposed against the uncanny, and the reader is delightfully held in thrall.

Murdoch describes a natural world that shimmers with something quite beyond the natural:

"The front door was wide open, framing distant cuckoo calls, while beyond the weedy gravel drive, beyond the clipped descending lawn and the erect hedge of raspberry-and-creamy spiraea, rose up the sea, a silvery blue, too thin and transparent to be called metallic, a texture as of skin-deep silver paper, rising up and merging at some indeterminate point with the pallid glittering blue of the midsummer sky. There was something of evening already in the powdery goldness of the sun and the ethereal thinness of the sea".

Meanwhile an intricate relational dance involving characters at once common and exotic plays itself out as the investigation unfolds. Everyone is captivated by desire, everyone is in need of salvation, and so the dance continues.

In the end redemption comes, perhaps a tad too tidily, with a happy ending in some ways too good to be true. But in every other aspect this is an excellent book, and one that can be enjoyed on many different levels.
Ironrunner
This book has it all.

John Ducane, a man both nice and good, navigates through a languid swirl of blackmail, love, black magic, and lust, in the course of his investigation of an apparent suicide in a government office. As he goes about this quest, the mundane is juxtaposed against the uncanny, and the reader is delightfully held in thrall.

Murdoch describes a natural world that shimmers with something quite beyond the natural:

"The front door was wide open, framing distant cuckoo calls, while beyond the weedy gravel drive, beyond the clipped descending lawn and the erect hedge of raspberry-and-creamy spiraea, rose up the sea, a silvery blue, too thin and transparent to be called metallic, a texture as of skin-deep silver paper, rising up and merging at some indeterminate point with the pallid glittering blue of the midsummer sky. There was something of evening already in the powdery goldness of the sun and the ethereal thinness of the sea".

Meanwhile an intricate relational dance involving characters at once common and exotic plays itself out as the investigation unfolds. Everyone is captivated by desire, everyone is in need of salvation, and so the dance continues.

In the end redemption comes, perhaps a tad too tidily, with a happy ending in some ways too good to be true. But in every other aspect this is an excellent book, and one that can be enjoyed on many different levels.
Uscavel
Murdoch explores how people's actions are driven by their self-images and personal mythologies. The vanities, fears or ambitions that dominate the way our lives unfold vary all over the place - from the need of the protagonist to "think well of himself," to the craving for love, the desire to serve humbly, or the need to forget something awful. Murdoch lets these motivations play out through her plots, which are really extravagant thought experiments. She focuses in particular on our secrets, the various reasons we have for hiding them, and the ways in which we slip into self indulgence and self-justification.

Some may find this approach a bit artificial and intellectual, but I felt that although the situations might be somewhat contrived, the characters' responses and actions rang true. I found the book very readable, and it met my main criterion for a novel - it taught me something new about why people act the way they do.
Uscavel
Murdoch explores how people's actions are driven by their self-images and personal mythologies. The vanities, fears or ambitions that dominate the way our lives unfold vary all over the place - from the need of the protagonist to "think well of himself," to the craving for love, the desire to serve humbly, or the need to forget something awful. Murdoch lets these motivations play out through her plots, which are really extravagant thought experiments. She focuses in particular on our secrets, the various reasons we have for hiding them, and the ways in which we slip into self indulgence and self-justification.

Some may find this approach a bit artificial and intellectual, but I felt that although the situations might be somewhat contrived, the characters' responses and actions rang true. I found the book very readable, and it met my main criterion for a novel - it taught me something new about why people act the way they do.
BroWelm
This novel is the most philosophical writing of Iris; according to the Socratic quest for the good man ('What is a good man like?) the better character, who try to fix this question is Ducane and his moralistic problems.

What is morality? are we able to be impartial? if not we need of God or we must be good?

According to the following phrase the humanity is unable to judges the others:

'...the whole situation of judging was abhorrent to him. He had watched his judges closely, and had come to the conclusion that no human being is worthy to be a judge.
(The Nice and the Good, Iris Murdoch, page 76, Vintage Classics)

Obviously none knows the right reply, but this is possible, only in a novel where the writer, is able to create the bad and the good, the false and the true, in other words this is a simple and pure mental exercise for a writer and her/his readers for a better and fair world.

The painting above represents the mystery of love intended as a good or bad behaviour, a perfect example of the pleasure and pain of Ducan and "his women."

In conclusion for a better life, we should follow the philosophy of the Occam's Razor, in other words we should to try to simplify our life, mainly because the human being, is not able to give reasonable responses to the mystery of our life.
BroWelm
This novel is the most philosophical writing of Iris; according to the Socratic quest for the good man ('What is a good man like?) the better character, who try to fix this question is Ducane and his moralistic problems.

What is morality? are we able to be impartial? if not we need of God or we must be good?

According to the following phrase the humanity is unable to judges the others:

'...the whole situation of judging was abhorrent to him. He had watched his judges closely, and had come to the conclusion that no human being is worthy to be a judge.
(The Nice and the Good, Iris Murdoch, page 76, Vintage Classics)

Obviously none knows the right reply, but this is possible, only in a novel where the writer, is able to create the bad and the good, the false and the true, in other words this is a simple and pure mental exercise for a writer and her/his readers for a better and fair world.

The painting above represents the mystery of love intended as a good or bad behaviour, a perfect example of the pleasure and pain of Ducan and "his women."

In conclusion for a better life, we should follow the philosophy of the Occam's Razor, in other words we should to try to simplify our life, mainly because the human being, is not able to give reasonable responses to the mystery of our life.