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ENDURING LOVE. epub download

by Ian McEWAN


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Home Ian Mcewan Enduring Love. Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, New York Times.

Ian McEwan has long been a poet of the arbitrary nightmare, his characters ineluctably swept up in others' fantasies, skidding into deepening violence, and-worst of all-becoming strangers to those who love them. Even his prose itself is a masterful and methodical exercise in de-familiarisation.

It asks us to choose between competing visions of events, and, in the process, forces us to examine the way we react to both art and life when something terrible happens. McEwan's writing-is unflaggingly poised and, as usual, capable of excavating deep, painful trenches in the back corridors of the psyche and the heart. Cleverly imagined, beautifully executed-Mr. McEwan has few peers.

Enduring Love (1997) is a novel by British writer Ian McEwan. The plot concerns two strangers who become perilously entangled after witnessing a deadly accident. On a beautiful and cloudless day, a middle-aged couple celebrate their union with a picnic. Joe Rose, aged 47, and his long term partner Clarissa Mellon are about to open a bottle of wine when a cry interrupts them

When I gave her a card, she kissed me full on the lips. Now it was settled in her mind I was unhinged, now she had told me we were finished, she appeared elated and generous.

When I gave her a card, she kissed me full on the lips. Now it was settled in her mind I was unhinged, now she had told me we were finished, she appeared elated and generous begin, and she had nothing to lose by being kind. Parry’s condition could not stand still. Given that fulfillment was not on hand, his love must turn to either indifference or hatred.

My love for you is hard and fierce, it won't take no for an answer, and it's moving steadily towards you, coming to claim you and deliver yo. – Enduring Love. Ian McEwan’s fictional world combin the bleak, dreamlike quality of de Chirico’s city-scapes with the strange eroticism of canvases by Balthus. Menace lies crouched between the lines of his neat, angular prose, and weird, grisly things occur in his books with nearly casual aplomb. Ian McEwan’s Somerset Maugham Award-winning collection First Love, Last Rites brought him instant recognition as one of the most influential voices writing in England today.

Ian McEwan is the critically acclaimed author of seventeen books. His first published work, a collection of short stories, First Love, Last Rites, won the Somerset Maugham Award

Ian McEwan is the critically acclaimed author of seventeen books. His first published work, a collection of short stories, First Love, Last Rites, won the Somerset Maugham Award. Atonement and Enduring Love have both been turned into award-winning films, The Children Act and On Chesil Beach are in production and set for release this year, and filming is currently underway for a BBC TV adaptation of The Child in Time. Библиографические данные.

One windy spring day in the Chilterns, Joe Rose& calm, organised life is shattered by a ballooning accident. The afternoon, Rose reflects, could have ended in mere tragedy but for his brief meeting with Jed Parry

One windy spring day in the Chilterns, Joe Rose& calm, organised life is shattered by a ballooning accident. The afternoon, Rose reflects, could have ended in mere tragedy but for his brief meeting with Jed Parry. Unknown to Rose, something passes between them -something that gives birth in Parry to an obsession so powerful that it will test to the limits Rose& beloved scientific rationalism, threaten the love of his wife Clarissa and drive him to the brink of murder and madness.

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ENDURING LOVE. epub download

ISBN13: 978-0224050319

ISBN: 0224050311

Author: Ian McEWAN

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Contemporary

Language: English

Publisher: Jonathan Cape; First edition (1997)

ePUB size: 1997 kb

FB2 size: 1245 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 509

Other Formats: docx doc txt mbr

Related to ENDURING LOVE. ePub books

Atineda
Joe Rose is spending the afternoon in the park with his longtime girlfriend Clarissa, when his life is changed forever. A hot air balloon carrying a man and his grandson is headed for disaster, and as Joe and several strangers attempt to ground it, one of them is killed. It’s one of the most intense and harrowing openings I’ve ever read.

Following the incident, Joe, who is a staunchly rational science writer, is plagued by the horrible randomness of the tragedy and his involvement in it. Meanwhile, Jed, one of the strangers who participated in the rescue attempt, becomes obsessed with Joe: he’s convinced that they fell in love that day, and that it’s his duty to show Joe God’s love.

As Jed continues to stalk Joe, Joe becomes consumed by paranoia on top of the guilt he feels from that day. It doesn’t help that no one takes his concerns about Jed seriously—including Clarissa.

This is a super compelling read. The prose is gorgeous, and the ongoing analysis of morality, guilt, responsibility and self-preservation is deeply fascinating. In fact, I think this book would have been interesting enough without all the craziness revolving around Jed. Parts of that storyline are certainly interesting, but it becomes slightly over the top.

It’s the subtler parts of the story that are most satisfying—such as Joe’s encounter with the dead man’s wife, who fears he was cheating on her the day he died. There’s a lot of layered complexity throughout as the characters’ perceptions and subjective realities are challenged. In order to convince others, we must first convince ourselves—but to what lengths, and at what cost?
Atineda
Joe Rose is spending the afternoon in the park with his longtime girlfriend Clarissa, when his life is changed forever. A hot air balloon carrying a man and his grandson is headed for disaster, and as Joe and several strangers attempt to ground it, one of them is killed. It’s one of the most intense and harrowing openings I’ve ever read.

Following the incident, Joe, who is a staunchly rational science writer, is plagued by the horrible randomness of the tragedy and his involvement in it. Meanwhile, Jed, one of the strangers who participated in the rescue attempt, becomes obsessed with Joe: he’s convinced that they fell in love that day, and that it’s his duty to show Joe God’s love.

As Jed continues to stalk Joe, Joe becomes consumed by paranoia on top of the guilt he feels from that day. It doesn’t help that no one takes his concerns about Jed seriously—including Clarissa.

This is a super compelling read. The prose is gorgeous, and the ongoing analysis of morality, guilt, responsibility and self-preservation is deeply fascinating. In fact, I think this book would have been interesting enough without all the craziness revolving around Jed. Parts of that storyline are certainly interesting, but it becomes slightly over the top.

It’s the subtler parts of the story that are most satisfying—such as Joe’s encounter with the dead man’s wife, who fears he was cheating on her the day he died. There’s a lot of layered complexity throughout as the characters’ perceptions and subjective realities are challenged. In order to convince others, we must first convince ourselves—but to what lengths, and at what cost?
Doktilar
I have read most of Ian McEwan's books and I have also read some of the less favorable reviews of Enduring Love. I am a casual reader, not a scholar, but I think McEwan's writing can be enjoyed on many levels. This is a good read for those who demand plausible, believable explanations of characters' behaviors and motivations. I agree that the author's discussions of poets and academic theories left me in the dust. However, the deliciously funny scene at the home of the aging hippie drug dealers almost made me hug my Kindle ("basically"). This is not a beach read but it is a good read, suspenseful, insightful and worth the time.
Doktilar
I have read most of Ian McEwan's books and I have also read some of the less favorable reviews of Enduring Love. I am a casual reader, not a scholar, but I think McEwan's writing can be enjoyed on many levels. This is a good read for those who demand plausible, believable explanations of characters' behaviors and motivations. I agree that the author's discussions of poets and academic theories left me in the dust. However, the deliciously funny scene at the home of the aging hippie drug dealers almost made me hug my Kindle ("basically"). This is not a beach read but it is a good read, suspenseful, insightful and worth the time.
Tantil
This is a character piece written as only Ian McEwan can. This is the story of Joe and Clarissa who are very much in love until a psychopathic obsessed man, Jed Parry, starts stalking Joe. Joe tells the story, so the reader knows everything Jed Parry is doing to Joe--following him, recording endless messages on his answering machine, writing long love-besotted letters. Or, at least, we think we do.... But Clarissa does not believe the stories Joe tells her. In fact, from her point of view, her husband has become suspicious, unreliable, a bit crazy and difficult. And, at some point, as the reader, I began to think that perhaps his wife was right. Perhaps Joe is delusional and conjured the whole thing up. At any rate, Joe's inability to convince Clarissa that he's not delusional, and Clarissa's disgust by Joe's slow unraveling in the face of Parry's relentless stalking, have a devastating effect on their relationship. It all comes to a climax which I will not divulge because I don't want to ruin the story for others who might want to read it. I loved this book. It is a bit slow at first. But, once I got into it, I felt as if I was inside Joe's head, understanding every paranoid thought, every loving and shattering moment.
Tantil
This is a character piece written as only Ian McEwan can. This is the story of Joe and Clarissa who are very much in love until a psychopathic obsessed man, Jed Parry, starts stalking Joe. Joe tells the story, so the reader knows everything Jed Parry is doing to Joe--following him, recording endless messages on his answering machine, writing long love-besotted letters. Or, at least, we think we do.... But Clarissa does not believe the stories Joe tells her. In fact, from her point of view, her husband has become suspicious, unreliable, a bit crazy and difficult. And, at some point, as the reader, I began to think that perhaps his wife was right. Perhaps Joe is delusional and conjured the whole thing up. At any rate, Joe's inability to convince Clarissa that he's not delusional, and Clarissa's disgust by Joe's slow unraveling in the face of Parry's relentless stalking, have a devastating effect on their relationship. It all comes to a climax which I will not divulge because I don't want to ruin the story for others who might want to read it. I loved this book. It is a bit slow at first. But, once I got into it, I felt as if I was inside Joe's head, understanding every paranoid thought, every loving and shattering moment.
Mr.jeka
This product has been reviewed by so many, the only cogent comments I can add are the few that follow:
1. Before reading this, I think it would be valuable to read: SaturdaySaturday, AtonementAtonement: A Novel, and Black DogsBlack Dogs: A Novel by McEwan
2. McEwan's later works seem to brighly inform Enduring Love; I could not put this down, but I don't know if that would have been the case if I hadn't already read most of his other, later fiction. Black Dogs, especially, relates to the psychological morass the protagonist exhibits.
3. I reflected on McEwan's influence from Kafka (The TrialThe Trial, The MetamorphosisThe Metamorphosis, as well as from Fowles (The CollectorThe Collector (Back Bay Books)) and Nabokov (LolitaLolita).

McEwan's twists and turns at the beginning of the book are clever and suspenseful; however, rather than focus on that already well-discussed opening, I think it's worthwhile to reflect on McEwan's continued push/pull of the religious/scientific continuum.
Mr.jeka
This product has been reviewed by so many, the only cogent comments I can add are the few that follow:
1. Before reading this, I think it would be valuable to read: SaturdaySaturday, AtonementAtonement: A Novel, and Black DogsBlack Dogs: A Novel by McEwan
2. McEwan's later works seem to brighly inform Enduring Love; I could not put this down, but I don't know if that would have been the case if I hadn't already read most of his other, later fiction. Black Dogs, especially, relates to the psychological morass the protagonist exhibits.
3. I reflected on McEwan's influence from Kafka (The TrialThe Trial, The MetamorphosisThe Metamorphosis, as well as from Fowles (The CollectorThe Collector (Back Bay Books)) and Nabokov (LolitaLolita).

McEwan's twists and turns at the beginning of the book are clever and suspenseful; however, rather than focus on that already well-discussed opening, I think it's worthwhile to reflect on McEwan's continued push/pull of the religious/scientific continuum.
Hirah
In "Enduring Love," Ian McEwan has written the most perfect first chapter I've ever read. Joe Rose, the narrator, begins by telling us, "Here's where it started" and you begin to realize, with horror, that what "it" is is the astonishingly rapid unraveling of the perfect life he has. The action begins when Joe happens to help with an accident waiting to happen--a hot air balloon buffeted by high winds, with a ten-year old boy cowering in the basket. Having acted unthinkingly to help save the boy, he and a handful of other men who happen to be nearby are towed upwards on the balloon lines, vainly attempting to bring it to earth. One by one they let go--all except one.

I won't divulge any more specifics than that, other than to say that McEwan is clearly a genius. His gift is in excavating the messy architecture of the human heart and exposing how very fleeting and tenuous some relationships are, while showing how firms the bonds of other relationships can be. The characters are realistically drawn and their interactions with each other true-to-life. There are a couple of twists, but they're believable--and they add to the general sense of loss and emotional horror and enforced loneliness this novel palpably sketches.
Hirah
In "Enduring Love," Ian McEwan has written the most perfect first chapter I've ever read. Joe Rose, the narrator, begins by telling us, "Here's where it started" and you begin to realize, with horror, that what "it" is is the astonishingly rapid unraveling of the perfect life he has. The action begins when Joe happens to help with an accident waiting to happen--a hot air balloon buffeted by high winds, with a ten-year old boy cowering in the basket. Having acted unthinkingly to help save the boy, he and a handful of other men who happen to be nearby are towed upwards on the balloon lines, vainly attempting to bring it to earth. One by one they let go--all except one.

I won't divulge any more specifics than that, other than to say that McEwan is clearly a genius. His gift is in excavating the messy architecture of the human heart and exposing how very fleeting and tenuous some relationships are, while showing how firms the bonds of other relationships can be. The characters are realistically drawn and their interactions with each other true-to-life. There are a couple of twists, but they're believable--and they add to the general sense of loss and emotional horror and enforced loneliness this novel palpably sketches.