» » Buddenbrooks (Twentieth Century Classics)

Buddenbrooks (Twentieth Century Classics) epub download

by Thomas Mann


Buddenbrooks (Twentieth Century Classics) Paperback – Import, 1989. Series: Twentieth Century Classics. Paperback: 592 pages.

Buddenbrooks (Twentieth Century Classics) Paperback – Import, 1989. by. Thomas Mann (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Buddenbrooks : Roman. Mann, Thomas, 1875-1955.

The group brought together 33 experts from each of the three categories. Each was allowed to name three books as having been the most important of the century.

Buddenbrooks is a 1901 novel by Thomas Mann, chronicling the decline of a wealthy north German merchant family over the course of four generations, incidentally portraying the manner of life and mores of the Hanseatic bourgeoisie in . .

Buddenbrooks is a 1901 novel by Thomas Mann, chronicling the decline of a wealthy north German merchant family over the course of four generations, incidentally portraying the manner of life and mores of the Hanseatic bourgeoisie in the years from 1835 to 1877. Mann drew deeply from the history of his own family, the Mann family of Lübeck, and their milieu.

Thomas Mann: 'Buddenbrooks'. This over 1,000-page masterpiece offers a panoramic view of society in the 19th century and exposes the collapse of a merchant family: unrecognized sons, disillusioned daughters and the loss of middle-class ideals

Thomas Mann: 'Buddenbrooks'. This over 1,000-page masterpiece offers a panoramic view of society in the 19th century and exposes the collapse of a merchant family: unrecognized sons, disillusioned daughters and the loss of middle-class ideals. Who would have imagined it in the beginning? A 26-year-old man without a high school diploma, but greatly ambitious, writes a two-pound book with a melancholy undertone.

Buddenbrooks, Thomas Mann Buddenbrooks is a 1901 novel by Thomas Mann, chronicling the decline of a wealthy north German merchant family over the course of four generations, incidentally portraying the manner of life and mores of the Hanseatic bourgeoisie in the years from 1835 to 1877. اریخ نخستین خوانش: بیست و ششم ژانویه سال 2012 میلادی بودنبروکها (زوال یک خاندان) - توماس مان (ماهی) ادبیات 782.

Home Thomas Mann Buddenbrooks: The Decline of a Family. THOMAS MANN was born in Germany in 1875. Buddenbrooks: The Decline of a Family, . He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1929, and left Germany for good in 1933. Among his major novels are Buddenbrooks (1901), The Magic Mountain (1924), the tetralogy Joseph and His Brothers (1933, 1934, 1936, 1943), and Doctor Faustus (1948). He is equally well known for his short stories and essays. Thomas Mann died in 1955. Confessions of Felix Krull, Confidence Man.

The Buddenbrook clan is everything you’d expect of a nineteenth-century German merchant family .

The Buddenbrook clan is everything you’d expect of a nineteenth-century German merchant family – wealthy, esteemed, established. Four generations later, a tide of twentieth-century modernism has gradually disintegrated the bourgeois values on which the Buddenbrooks built their success. In this, Mann’s first novel, his astounding, l family epic, he portrays the transition of genteel Germanic stability to a very modern uncertainty.

It portrays the downfall (already announced in the subtitle, Decline of a Family) of a wealthy mercantile family of L�beck over four generations. The book is generally understood as a portrait of the German bourgeois society throughout several decades of the 19th century.

Imprint: Vintage Classics. Published: 29/07/1996. Imprint: Vintage Classics.

Buddenbrooks The Decline of a Family

Buddenbrooks (Twentieth Century Classics) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0140181388

ISBN: 0140181385

Author: Thomas Mann

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Classics

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New Ed edition (1989)

Pages: 592 pages

ePUB size: 1632 kb

FB2 size: 1311 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 998

Other Formats: txt mbr lrf lit

Related to Buddenbrooks (Twentieth Century Classics) ePub books

Freaky Hook
If you are going to reread a classic, go for the Everyman edition if you can. Go for the beautiful printing, fine paper, and comfortable feel in the hand, even when the novel is as long as this one (722 pages). Go for the informative introductions and historical material. And in this case, go for the lively new translation.

I was 19 when I first read BUDDENBROOKS, the family saga that brought Mann to fame in 1901, at the age of 26. I remember enjoying it then, though I can't recall quite why. Now, almost six decades later, I know exactly why: it may well be the last example of the grand 19th-century novel, filled with well-delineated characters, emotional struggles, fine set pieces, and -- a surprise for me -- flashes of wit. But significantly, it is a nineteenth-century novel that pokes its nose into the twentieth. Mann is already experimenting with devices that will become part of the new narrative, such as seasoning a third-person description of a character with first- or second-person glimpses of his inner thoughts, or (as in his brilliant penultimate chapter) setting up the readers for a certain conclusion, but letting them decide what that conclusion must be, confirming it only in a later chapter. And of course THE DECLINE OF A FAMILY, which is the book's subtitle, is brought about in part by its inability to cope with the methods of a new era.

It has always struck me as strange that Mann dared to send his first novel out into the world with that subtitle, almost like Eugene O'Neill calling a play LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT. But despite the implication, BUDDENBROOKS is not at all depressing. This is because the let-down is gentle and never absolute; others in the book endure bankruptcy, disgrace, and even imprisonment, but the Buddenbrooks merely fade into a nostalgic memory. But it is also because of the characters, who remain in the reader's heart even after the supporting structure has collapsed. You could say that the book has three parts: the opening third, which shines with the beauty and spirit of the young heroine, Tony Buddenbrook (Antonie); the middle portion, centered around Tony's brother Tom, head of the family grain firm and a state senator; and the last 150, which focus increasingly on Tom's son Hanno, a sensitive musician who disappoints his father but emerges as the most sympathetic character of all.

What was new to me this time was the translation by John E. Woods, in place of the old standard version by H. T. Lowe-Porter. I no longer have a copy to compare, but it strikes me that Woods is lighter, less in awe of his subject. Here is his description of Tony as a teenager:

She was really very pretty, little Tony Buddenbrooks was. Flowing
from beneath her straw hat was a thick head of blond hair, curly
of course, and turning darker with each passing year; and the
slightly protruding upper lip gave a saucy look to her fresh little
face with its lively grey blue eyes, a sauciness repeated in her
small, graceful body. There was self-assurance in the spring of her
thin legs in their snow-white stockings. A great many people knew
her, and they would greet Consul Buddenbrook's little daughter as
she stepped through the garden gate onto the chestnut-lined lane.

Woods is also perfect in capturing the unctuous tone of Herr Grünlich, Tony's first serious suitor, buttering up the parents in order to secure the daughter; he reminds me of the slimy Rev. Collins in PRIDE AND PREJUDICE. Here his is boasting of his knowledge of her grandmother's family:

"I have the honor of a slight acquaintance with the family.
Excellent people, one and all, such heart, such intellect. Ahem.
Indeed, it would be a better world if all families had such
qualities. One finds in that family such faith, such charity,
such sincere piety, in short, the very ideal of true Christianity;
and yet all of it is united with a cosmopolitan refinement and
brilliant elegance that I personally find quite charming, Madame
Buddenbrook."

I was less certain when he characterizes a much later suitor, the Bavarian, Herr Permaneder:

"Munich ain't no town for business. Forks want their peace 'n' a
mugga beer. And y' certainly wouldn't read no telegram while
you're eatin', sure as hell wouldn't. You got another kinda
gittup 'n' go this way, damn if y' don't. Thanks heaps. I'll
have 'nother glass."

Permaneder may come from the other end of Germany, but I'm not sure that the American translocation entirely works -- but then again, I've not read the German. On the other hand, his entrance into the novel at around page 300 immediately raises the question of his social status and the Buddenbrooks' as well. Up to now, we have seen them as one of the most prominent families in the city (Lubeck, though not so mentioned). They have money, they have influence, they seem to have taste. It is only now that we see that their status as merchants is entirely a function of their success; they have certainly no pretensions to birth, or much to education; Tom Buddenbrook did not even complete high school. They may not be parvenus like Permaneder -- but when, in the middle section, things begin to go wrong, they lack the deep roots to sustain them.

Tom marries well, however, a cultured aristocrat from Holland who owns a Stradivarius that she plays beautifully. She passes her musical genes to their only son, Johann, known as Hanno. Mann dedicates these later parts (there are 11 in all) to his brother Heinrich, also an author, and to a friend who was both a painter and musician. For the first time, I began to see the Buddenbrook saga as autobiographical, with himself as the sensitive and utterly non-commercial Hanno. And here Mann offers some of the most evocative writing about music I have ever read in fiction. There is a long passage of several pages late in the book, which serves as a spiritual road map to the travels of Hanno's psyche. But I want to end with an earlier passage, because it combines rhapsodic writing with a very precise explanation of what Hanno in doing, in a semi-improvised Wagnerian sonata he performs with his mother:

And now came the ending, Hanno's beloved finale, which was to
add the final simple, sublime touch to the whole composition.
Wrapped in the sparkling, bubbling runs of the violin, which
rang out with gentle, bell-like purity, he struck the E-minor
chord tremolo pianissimo. It grew, broadened, swelled slowly,
very slowly, and once it was at forte, Hanno sounded the
dissonant C sharp that would lead back to the original key;
and while the Stradivarius surged and dashed sonorously around
the same C sharp, he used all his strength to crescendo the
dissonance to fortissimo. He refused to resolve the chord,
withheld it from himself and his audience. What would resolution
be like, this ravishing and liberating submersion into B major?
Incomparable joy, the delight of sweet rapture. Peace, bliss,
heaven itself. Not yet, not yet -- one moment more of delay,
of unbearable tension that would make the release all the more
precious. He wanted one last taste of this insistent, urgent
longing, of this craving that filled his whole being, of this
cramped and strained exertion of will, which at the same time
refused all fulfillment and release -- he knew that happiness
lasts only a moment.
Freaky Hook
If you are going to reread a classic, go for the Everyman edition if you can. Go for the beautiful printing, fine paper, and comfortable feel in the hand, even when the novel is as long as this one (722 pages). Go for the informative introductions and historical material. And in this case, go for the lively new translation.

I was 19 when I first read BUDDENBROOKS, the family saga that brought Mann to fame in 1901, at the age of 26. I remember enjoying it then, though I can't recall quite why. Now, almost six decades later, I know exactly why: it may well be the last example of the grand 19th-century novel, filled with well-delineated characters, emotional struggles, fine set pieces, and -- a surprise for me -- flashes of wit. But significantly, it is a nineteenth-century novel that pokes its nose into the twentieth. Mann is already experimenting with devices that will become part of the new narrative, such as seasoning a third-person description of a character with first- or second-person glimpses of his inner thoughts, or (as in his brilliant penultimate chapter) setting up the readers for a certain conclusion, but letting them decide what that conclusion must be, confirming it only in a later chapter. And of course THE DECLINE OF A FAMILY, which is the book's subtitle, is brought about in part by its inability to cope with the methods of a new era.

It has always struck me as strange that Mann dared to send his first novel out into the world with that subtitle, almost like Eugene O'Neill calling a play LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT. But despite the implication, BUDDENBROOKS is not at all depressing. This is because the let-down is gentle and never absolute; others in the book endure bankruptcy, disgrace, and even imprisonment, but the Buddenbrooks merely fade into a nostalgic memory. But it is also because of the characters, who remain in the reader's heart even after the supporting structure has collapsed. You could say that the book has three parts: the opening third, which shines with the beauty and spirit of the young heroine, Tony Buddenbrook (Antonie); the middle portion, centered around Tony's brother Tom, head of the family grain firm and a state senator; and the last 150, which focus increasingly on Tom's son Hanno, a sensitive musician who disappoints his father but emerges as the most sympathetic character of all.

What was new to me this time was the translation by John E. Woods, in place of the old standard version by H. T. Lowe-Porter. I no longer have a copy to compare, but it strikes me that Woods is lighter, less in awe of his subject. Here is his description of Tony as a teenager:

She was really very pretty, little Tony Buddenbrooks was. Flowing
from beneath her straw hat was a thick head of blond hair, curly
of course, and turning darker with each passing year; and the
slightly protruding upper lip gave a saucy look to her fresh little
face with its lively grey blue eyes, a sauciness repeated in her
small, graceful body. There was self-assurance in the spring of her
thin legs in their snow-white stockings. A great many people knew
her, and they would greet Consul Buddenbrook's little daughter as
she stepped through the garden gate onto the chestnut-lined lane.

Woods is also perfect in capturing the unctuous tone of Herr Grünlich, Tony's first serious suitor, buttering up the parents in order to secure the daughter; he reminds me of the slimy Rev. Collins in PRIDE AND PREJUDICE. Here his is boasting of his knowledge of her grandmother's family:

"I have the honor of a slight acquaintance with the family.
Excellent people, one and all, such heart, such intellect. Ahem.
Indeed, it would be a better world if all families had such
qualities. One finds in that family such faith, such charity,
such sincere piety, in short, the very ideal of true Christianity;
and yet all of it is united with a cosmopolitan refinement and
brilliant elegance that I personally find quite charming, Madame
Buddenbrook."

I was less certain when he characterizes a much later suitor, the Bavarian, Herr Permaneder:

"Munich ain't no town for business. Forks want their peace 'n' a
mugga beer. And y' certainly wouldn't read no telegram while
you're eatin', sure as hell wouldn't. You got another kinda
gittup 'n' go this way, damn if y' don't. Thanks heaps. I'll
have 'nother glass."

Permaneder may come from the other end of Germany, but I'm not sure that the American translocation entirely works -- but then again, I've not read the German. On the other hand, his entrance into the novel at around page 300 immediately raises the question of his social status and the Buddenbrooks' as well. Up to now, we have seen them as one of the most prominent families in the city (Lubeck, though not so mentioned). They have money, they have influence, they seem to have taste. It is only now that we see that their status as merchants is entirely a function of their success; they have certainly no pretensions to birth, or much to education; Tom Buddenbrook did not even complete high school. They may not be parvenus like Permaneder -- but when, in the middle section, things begin to go wrong, they lack the deep roots to sustain them.

Tom marries well, however, a cultured aristocrat from Holland who owns a Stradivarius that she plays beautifully. She passes her musical genes to their only son, Johann, known as Hanno. Mann dedicates these later parts (there are 11 in all) to his brother Heinrich, also an author, and to a friend who was both a painter and musician. For the first time, I began to see the Buddenbrook saga as autobiographical, with himself as the sensitive and utterly non-commercial Hanno. And here Mann offers some of the most evocative writing about music I have ever read in fiction. There is a long passage of several pages late in the book, which serves as a spiritual road map to the travels of Hanno's psyche. But I want to end with an earlier passage, because it combines rhapsodic writing with a very precise explanation of what Hanno in doing, in a semi-improvised Wagnerian sonata he performs with his mother:

And now came the ending, Hanno's beloved finale, which was to
add the final simple, sublime touch to the whole composition.
Wrapped in the sparkling, bubbling runs of the violin, which
rang out with gentle, bell-like purity, he struck the E-minor
chord tremolo pianissimo. It grew, broadened, swelled slowly,
very slowly, and once it was at forte, Hanno sounded the
dissonant C sharp that would lead back to the original key;
and while the Stradivarius surged and dashed sonorously around
the same C sharp, he used all his strength to crescendo the
dissonance to fortissimo. He refused to resolve the chord,
withheld it from himself and his audience. What would resolution
be like, this ravishing and liberating submersion into B major?
Incomparable joy, the delight of sweet rapture. Peace, bliss,
heaven itself. Not yet, not yet -- one moment more of delay,
of unbearable tension that would make the release all the more
precious. He wanted one last taste of this insistent, urgent
longing, of this craving that filled his whole being, of this
cramped and strained exertion of will, which at the same time
refused all fulfillment and release -- he knew that happiness
lasts only a moment.
Mbon
This is a delightful translation of a book I've tried several times over the last 45 plus years to read without much success, but this time it will be a pleasure.

Although I studied and later worked (as an international banker) in Germany for over three years, read and spoke German easily and still use German occasionally, I alway found the subtlety of Thomas Mann's longer novels in both German and even English translation (except for Doktor Faustus) daunting, determined as I was.

This new translation by David Wood is wonderful--playfully ironic, colloquial, and learned at the same time--and shows what a tragedy it can be to have the "wrong" or at least, "not altogether graceful", translator. (Imagine what an injustice to Mark Twain or Garrison Keillor a dry pedant would be!)

I am going to read all the Thomas Mann novels that Wood has translated as soon as I can find the time, and go at the German originals again with Wood as my more trusted guide. I know now that I probably missed a great deal.
Mbon
This is a delightful translation of a book I've tried several times over the last 45 plus years to read without much success, but this time it will be a pleasure.

Although I studied and later worked (as an international banker) in Germany for over three years, read and spoke German easily and still use German occasionally, I alway found the subtlety of Thomas Mann's longer novels in both German and even English translation (except for Doktor Faustus) daunting, determined as I was.

This new translation by David Wood is wonderful--playfully ironic, colloquial, and learned at the same time--and shows what a tragedy it can be to have the "wrong" or at least, "not altogether graceful", translator. (Imagine what an injustice to Mark Twain or Garrison Keillor a dry pedant would be!)

I am going to read all the Thomas Mann novels that Wood has translated as soon as I can find the time, and go at the German originals again with Wood as my more trusted guide. I know now that I probably missed a great deal.
Error parents
This is a long book. It is very descriptive to the point that the first time I was in Lubeck as a visitor I recognized some of it based on this story.

This is a story of lost vigor due to an obsession with family tradition and status. There are two other books that are very similar, written in different periods. The first is Domby and Son by Charles Dickenson. The second is The Brothers Askanazi byJoseph Singer.

These books represent different cultures, but have the same themes.
Error parents
This is a long book. It is very descriptive to the point that the first time I was in Lubeck as a visitor I recognized some of it based on this story.

This is a story of lost vigor due to an obsession with family tradition and status. There are two other books that are very similar, written in different periods. The first is Domby and Son by Charles Dickenson. The second is The Brothers Askanazi byJoseph Singer.

These books represent different cultures, but have the same themes.
Ieslyaenn
As this wonderfully alive book is reviewed by voices stronger than mine, let me say this. I have re-read it several times and each reading reveals more of the individual characterizations. The sister’s lack of understanding of the responsibility of maintaining fortunes of the family, the squandering, the acquiescence, the results…all must be taken into account before the true greatness of Mann’s masterpiece can be fully internalized.
Ieslyaenn
As this wonderfully alive book is reviewed by voices stronger than mine, let me say this. I have re-read it several times and each reading reveals more of the individual characterizations. The sister’s lack of understanding of the responsibility of maintaining fortunes of the family, the squandering, the acquiescence, the results…all must be taken into account before the true greatness of Mann’s masterpiece can be fully internalized.
Anyshoun
This has to be one of the greatest books I have ever read, which is saying something considering I am including War and Peace is that group. Thomas Mann was a German author who won the Noble prize for literature and from what I read this seems like the best translation from the original German.It is the story of a middle class merchant family in the middle eighteen hundreds. The middle class was a merchant class as versus the aristocracy of the time. There was still a very strong class system that existed but this class did establish a lavish life style based on their income. The characters and period in history are richly described and really suck you into the story. Unfortunately Thomas Mann's other major work, the Magic Mountain in not in electronic formate but I plan to get a copy of this book. Because he is a German author, I am not sure how well known he is to the general reading public outside of Germany, but if you stumble across this book and this review, please read it, you won't be sorry.
Anyshoun
This has to be one of the greatest books I have ever read, which is saying something considering I am including War and Peace is that group. Thomas Mann was a German author who won the Noble prize for literature and from what I read this seems like the best translation from the original German.It is the story of a middle class merchant family in the middle eighteen hundreds. The middle class was a merchant class as versus the aristocracy of the time. There was still a very strong class system that existed but this class did establish a lavish life style based on their income. The characters and period in history are richly described and really suck you into the story. Unfortunately Thomas Mann's other major work, the Magic Mountain in not in electronic formate but I plan to get a copy of this book. Because he is a German author, I am not sure how well known he is to the general reading public outside of Germany, but if you stumble across this book and this review, please read it, you won't be sorry.
Steel_Blade
A true masterpiece and this is the best translation of it (Woods) that I've found. You owe it to yourself to read this at some point in your life. Witty, deep, complex, tragic, uplifting, beautiful, profound - it's all of these and more.
Steel_Blade
A true masterpiece and this is the best translation of it (Woods) that I've found. You owe it to yourself to read this at some point in your life. Witty, deep, complex, tragic, uplifting, beautiful, profound - it's all of these and more.
Jugore
This book is so well written. It's set in the 19th Century in Germany, but the characters and themes ring true today.
Jugore
This book is so well written. It's set in the 19th Century in Germany, but the characters and themes ring true today.