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Amadis of Gaul: A Novel of Chivalry of the 14th Century Presumably First Written in Spanish (Studies in Romance Languages, 11) (English and Spanish Edition) epub download

by Edwin Bray Place,Garci Rodriguez De Montalvo,Herbert C. Behm


Place, Edwin Bray, 1891-; Behm, Herbert C; Rodríguez de Montalvo, Garci. Book digitized by Google from the library of the University of Michigan and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Place, Edwin Bray, 1891-; Behm, Herbert C; Rodríguez de Montalvo, Garci. Includes bibliographical references.

The first two books of Amadis of Gaul are a pleasure to read, absorbing, and hard to put down

The first two books of Amadis of Gaul are a pleasure to read, absorbing, and hard to put down. However, the story soon becomes more politically intriguing and generally deeper, so that the reader is fully enthralled by the end of Book II. Indeed, it is hard to resist the temptation, even after The first two books of Amadis of Gaul are a pleasure to read, absorbing, and hard to put down.

Castilian author who arranged the modern version of the chivalric romance Amadis of Gaul, written in three books in the 14th century by an unknown author.

Readers for centuries have delighted in his tales of adventure. Castilian author who arranged the modern version of the chivalric romance Amadis of Gaul, written in three books in the 14th century by an unknown author.

Rodríguez De Montalvo, Garci. Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. You can read Amadis of Gaul : a Novel of Chivalry of the 14th Century Presumably First Written in Spanish 4 by Rodríguez De Montalvo, Garci in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Edwin Place was professor emeritus at Northwestern University.

ISBN 10: 0813113040 ISBN 13: 9780813113043. This exquisite English translation restores a masterpiece to print. Edwin Place was professor emeritus at Northwestern University.

Garci R. de Montalvo. University Press of Kentucky

Garci R. University Press of Kentucky. On December 26, 2004, a massive tsunami triggered by an underwater earthquake pummeled the coasts of Thailand, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and other countries along the Indian Ocean. A clear and definitive analysis of the second deadliest natural disaster on record, The Indian Ocean Tsunami will be of interest to environmentalists and political scientists alike, as well as to planners and administrators of s programs. Пользовательский отзыв - Mikalina - LibraryThing. An absolute must for the lovers of Don Quixote.

A Journal of Medieval Studies. The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis. Volume 50, Number 3 Ju. 1975. The Digital Middle Ages: An Introduction.

Book DescriptionIn the long history of European prose fiction, few works have been more influential and more popular than the romance of chivalry Amadis of Gaul. Although its original author is unknown, it was probably written during the early fourteenthcentury

Book DescriptionIn the long history of European prose fiction, few works have been more influential and more popular than the romance of chivalry Amadis of Gaul. Although its original author is unknown, it was probably written during the early fourteenthcentury.

I am not a modern romance novel reader but find these 16th and 17th century chivalric novels intriguing and .

I am not a modern romance novel reader but find these 16th and 17th century chivalric novels intriguing and we are comparing this novel with Don Quijite. Bought it for a class and reading excerpts from it, cannot wait to read the whole book. Once the paternity and early deeds of the main character have been established, Amadis of Gaul turns into a fine narrative devoid of that numbing lifelessness so typical of many other Medieval works, particularly the excruciatingly dull and unimaginative Malory collation of Arthur, Lancelot and Tristan legends (my apologies for provoking the ire of ardent medievalists, but truth be told reading Malory is. a chore).

Part of the Amadís de Gaula Series). by Garci Rodríguez de Montalvo. In the long history of European prose, few works have been more influential and popular than Amadis of Gaul

Part of the Amadís de Gaula Series). In the long history of European prose, few works have been more influential and popular than Amadis of Gaul. It is a landmark work among the knight-errantry tales and probably derives from an oral tradition. Although its original author is unknown, it was likely written during the early fourteenth century, with the first known version of this work, dating from 1508, written in Spanish by Garci Ord ez (or Rodr guez) de Montalvo.

Amadis of Gaul: A Novel of Chivalry of the 14th Century Presumably First Written in Spanish (Studies in Romance Languages, 11) (English and Spanish Edition) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0813113043

ISBN: 0813113040

Author: Edwin Bray Place,Garci Rodriguez De Montalvo,Herbert C. Behm

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Classics

Language: English Spanish

Publisher: Univ Pr of Kentucky (September 1, 1974)

Pages: 686 pages

ePUB size: 1625 kb

FB2 size: 1405 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 482

Other Formats: lit mbr mobi txt

Related to Amadis of Gaul: A Novel of Chivalry of the 14th Century Presumably First Written in Spanish (Studies in Romance Languages, 11) (English and Spanish Edition) ePub books

Rollers from Abdun
If you plan to read Don Quixote, or just want to read a terrific story about the days of knights and their ladies, this book is a classic. Probably begun in the 14th century it was revised and expanded (and given numerous sequels) on into the 18th century! It was an early best-seller, first read to audiences and then once printing was introduced, in handy book form. Cervantes' entire project of Don Quixote could be said to be a commentary on Amadis. And a very complex commentary at that. Deep in the wilderness and far from his lady-love Dulcinea, Don Quixote decides to follow the example of Amadis, not Orlando. To make sense of that, you'll be wonderfully prepared if you've immersed yourself in this book first. I personally was so gripped by Books I and II that I ordered Books III and IV to find out what happened next. It's an exciting read. And if you're a student at any level there's material here for nearly endless papers and studies, especially in relation to Cervantes. Highly recommended!
Rollers from Abdun
If you plan to read Don Quixote, or just want to read a terrific story about the days of knights and their ladies, this book is a classic. Probably begun in the 14th century it was revised and expanded (and given numerous sequels) on into the 18th century! It was an early best-seller, first read to audiences and then once printing was introduced, in handy book form. Cervantes' entire project of Don Quixote could be said to be a commentary on Amadis. And a very complex commentary at that. Deep in the wilderness and far from his lady-love Dulcinea, Don Quixote decides to follow the example of Amadis, not Orlando. To make sense of that, you'll be wonderfully prepared if you've immersed yourself in this book first. I personally was so gripped by Books I and II that I ordered Books III and IV to find out what happened next. It's an exciting read. And if you're a student at any level there's material here for nearly endless papers and studies, especially in relation to Cervantes. Highly recommended!
Drelajurus
Great romance novel. I am not a modern romance novel reader but find these 16th and 17th century chivalric novels intriguing and we are comparing this novel with Don Quijite. Bought it for a class and reading excerpts from it, cannot wait to read the whole book.
Drelajurus
Great romance novel. I am not a modern romance novel reader but find these 16th and 17th century chivalric novels intriguing and we are comparing this novel with Don Quijite. Bought it for a class and reading excerpts from it, cannot wait to read the whole book.
Silvermaster
I bought this book as a father's day gift to my father who is a direct decendent of the author (as am I, of course). I just wish to express my sincere gratitude to the translator/editor for bringing these inspiring texts back to life!

I hope you'll consider these works and keep the history alive!
Silvermaster
I bought this book as a father's day gift to my father who is a direct decendent of the author (as am I, of course). I just wish to express my sincere gratitude to the translator/editor for bringing these inspiring texts back to life!

I hope you'll consider these works and keep the history alive!
Weernis
if you like stories of knights, you will like this.
Weernis
if you like stories of knights, you will like this.
Kearanny
Once the paternity and early deeds of the main character have been established, Amadis of Gaul turns into a fine narrative devoid of that numbing lifelessness so typical of many other Medieval works, particularly the excruciatingly dull and unimaginative Malory collation of Arthur, Lancelot and Tristan legends (my apologies for provoking the ire of ardent medievalists, but truth be told reading Malory is a chore). I reckon Montalvo to be a Homer of sorts, who with deft hands subtly shapes, coloring and augmenting the existing legend into a more convincing and worldly work--amazingly enough, a work still suitable to our modern day sensibilites! Characters in Amadis have opinions, occasionally make sarcastic asides, and (believe it or not) engage in sexual intercourse, overall acting in a more human manner than any of their medieval literary counterparts. A comparison that comes to my mind is the way in which the stiff and rigid statues of medieval churches became more realistic by the re-introduction of the contrapposto technique. I initially purchased this because it's specifically mentioned during an amusing episode in Don Quixote where the curate, barber, the Don's niece and his housekeeper believe, in consigning his vast library of books of chivalry to the flames, they are curing him of his madness. It was exciting to come across a scene in Amadis that Cervantes clearly lampoons in Don Quixote involving Amadis bemoaning the fact he hasn't been able to give Gandalin, his squire, an island as recompense (all this before Amadis places himself into a self-imposed exile, another scenario also spoofed in DQ) for fealty to his master. If you've read Don Quixote you'll know that an island is the promised gift that becomes fantasized carrot and a relentless jeremiad for Sancho Panzo. If you liked Orlando Furioso (which I recommend in Waldman's readable prose translation) you will like this as well, perhaps a bit more. Despite being an academic press, which explains the higher cost, this work is a fun read and is rendered into a charming, simplified English by translators Herbert Behm and Edwin Place. It could easily fit in the Penguin classics catalog as a standard work.
Kearanny
Once the paternity and early deeds of the main character have been established, Amadis of Gaul turns into a fine narrative devoid of that numbing lifelessness so typical of many other Medieval works, particularly the excruciatingly dull and unimaginative Malory collation of Arthur, Lancelot and Tristan legends (my apologies for provoking the ire of ardent medievalists, but truth be told reading Malory is a chore). I reckon Montalvo to be a Homer of sorts, who with deft hands subtly shapes, coloring and augmenting the existing legend into a more convincing and worldly work--amazingly enough, a work still suitable to our modern day sensibilites! Characters in Amadis have opinions, occasionally make sarcastic asides, and (believe it or not) engage in sexual intercourse, overall acting in a more human manner than any of their medieval literary counterparts. A comparison that comes to my mind is the way in which the stiff and rigid statues of medieval churches became more realistic by the re-introduction of the contrapposto technique. I initially purchased this because it's specifically mentioned during an amusing episode in Don Quixote where the curate, barber, the Don's niece and his housekeeper believe, in consigning his vast library of books of chivalry to the flames, they are curing him of his madness. It was exciting to come across a scene in Amadis that Cervantes clearly lampoons in Don Quixote involving Amadis bemoaning the fact he hasn't been able to give Gandalin, his squire, an island as recompense (all this before Amadis places himself into a self-imposed exile, another scenario also spoofed in DQ) for fealty to his master. If you've read Don Quixote you'll know that an island is the promised gift that becomes fantasized carrot and a relentless jeremiad for Sancho Panzo. If you liked Orlando Furioso (which I recommend in Waldman's readable prose translation) you will like this as well, perhaps a bit more. Despite being an academic press, which explains the higher cost, this work is a fun read and is rendered into a charming, simplified English by translators Herbert Behm and Edwin Place. It could easily fit in the Penguin classics catalog as a standard work.
Yannara
Amadis of Gaul is, in one word, classic. It's the novel from which all modern adventure and fantasy novels come from. It's insipired imitators and parodies, including Cervantes' equally classic Don Quixote--a book which has great reverence for Amadis itself. Knights, damsels, giants, dragons--this book truly has it all.

The best part is, the editors wrote this book so that it's easy for everyone to read. No preservation of archaic dialects here--pick this book up and you'll be able to read it with no problems. Recommended for all lovers of literature.
Yannara
Amadis of Gaul is, in one word, classic. It's the novel from which all modern adventure and fantasy novels come from. It's insipired imitators and parodies, including Cervantes' equally classic Don Quixote--a book which has great reverence for Amadis itself. Knights, damsels, giants, dragons--this book truly has it all.

The best part is, the editors wrote this book so that it's easy for everyone to read. No preservation of archaic dialects here--pick this book up and you'll be able to read it with no problems. Recommended for all lovers of literature.