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The Way We Live Now epub download

by Anthony Trollope


The Way We Live Now is a satirical novel by Anthony Trollope, published in London in 1875 after first appearing in serialised form. It is one of the last significant Victorian novels to have been published in monthly parts.

The Way We Live Now is a satirical novel by Anthony Trollope, published in London in 1875 after first appearing in serialised form. The novel is Trollope's longest, comprising 100 chapters, and is particularly rich in sub-plot. It was inspired by the financial scandals of the early 1870s; Trollope had just returned to England from abroad, and was appalled by the greed and dishonesty those scandals exposed.

Home Anthony Trollope The Way We Live No.

Home Anthony Trollope The Way We Live Now. Home. The way we live now, . 00. But Marie, though shewas thus isolated, and now altogether separated from the lords andduchesses who a few weeks since had been interested in her career,was the undoubted owner of the money,-a fact which was beyond thecomprehension of Madame Melmotte. She could understand,-and wasdelighted to understand,-that a very large sum of money had beensaved from the wreck, and that she might therefore look forward toprosperous tranquillity for the rest of her life. I am not proposing to myself to marry you for your money. Luckilyfor me,-I hope luckily for both of us,-it is not necessary that Ishould do s. 01. "And then I seem so to have fallen through in everything. I don'tknow what I've got to give to a man in return for all that you offerto give to m.

LibriVox recording of The Way We Live Now, by Anthony Trollope. It was regarded by many of Trollope's contemporaries as his finest work. One of his longest novels (it contains a hundred chapters), The Way We Live Now is particularly rich in sub-plot. Read by Debra Lynn  .

The Way We Live Right Now - was an adaptation of the Trollope novel The Way We Live Now, re setting it in the present day.

On his return Trollope published a book, "Australia and New Zealand" (1873). The Way We Live Right Now - was an adaptation of the Trollope novel The Way We Live Now, re setting it in the present day.

ANTHONY TROLLOPE was born in London in 1815 and died in 1882. The notable titles among his many other novels and books include He Knew He Was Right (1868–9), The Way We Live Now (1874–5), An Autobiography (1875–6) and Dr Worth’s School (1881)

ANTHONY TROLLOPE was born in London in 1815 and died in 1882. His father was a barrister who went bankrupt and the family was maintained by his mother, Frances, who was a well-known writer. The notable titles among his many other novels and books include He Knew He Was Right (1868–9), The Way We Live Now (1874–5), An Autobiography (1875–6) and Dr Worth’s School (1881). FRANK KERMODE was born in 1919 and educated at Douglas High School and Liverpool University.

Trollope titled this novel The Way We Live Now referring to the 1870s, but he could have been . My next question for you is this.

Trollope titled this novel The Way We Live Now referring to the 1870s, but he could have been referring to the 1890s, the 1990s, or the 2010s. So read about The Way We Live Now and see if you know Ruby Ruggles, Felix Carbury, Paul Montague, Hetta Carbury, Winifred Hurtle, Roger Carbury, Georgiana Longestaffe or Augustus Melmotte. Is reading a BIG ASS book such as The Way We Live Now, really worth my time and attention? Or am I better off turning on the television and watching reality TV which is obviously less difficult, no less time consuming, and requires significantly less brain power? My answer is simple.

Anthony trollope series: Chronicles of Barsetshire.

II. The carbury family. Anthony trollope series: Chronicles of Barsetshire. Other author's books: Doctor Thorne. Can You Forgive Her? The Last Chronicle of Barset.

Anthony Trollope, 1815-1885 Novelist Anthony Trollope was born the fourth son of Thomas Anthony Trollope, a barrister, and Frances Trollope in London, England. At the age of one, he was taken to a house called Julians. He attended many famous schools but as a large, awkward boy, he never felt in place among the aristocrats he met there.

One of the greatest and most relevant works of Victorian literature, The Way We Live Now is a powerful satire on avarice and other vices that have come to shape and blemish modern society. Featuring a variety of characters who resort to swindle and deceit all in the interest on monetary gain, The Way We Live Now is a moral rumination that is easily Trollope’s masterpiece.

The Way We Live Now epub download

ISBN13: 978-1619492448

ISBN: 161949244X

Author: Anthony Trollope

Category: Literature and Fiction

Subcategory: Classics

Language: English

Publisher: Empire Books (January 6, 2012)

Pages: 438 pages

ePUB size: 1344 kb

FB2 size: 1226 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 696

Other Formats: mbr rtf lrf lit

Related to The Way We Live Now ePub books

Mustard Forgotten
Starts a bit slow but rewards perseverance. By the end I didn't want to put it down and I had no idea how it was going to turn out!
Really well-rounded characters and in particular realistic and varied female characters (not always something you get in Victorian novels). It addresses a whole lot of social issues in a compelling way without being naggy or feeling like a history lesson. Teaches you quite a lot about Victorian economics and how society was changing at that time.
In terms of format, it worked absolutely fine on my Kindle.
I'd definitely read more by Trollope.
Mustard Forgotten
Starts a bit slow but rewards perseverance. By the end I didn't want to put it down and I had no idea how it was going to turn out!
Really well-rounded characters and in particular realistic and varied female characters (not always something you get in Victorian novels). It addresses a whole lot of social issues in a compelling way without being naggy or feeling like a history lesson. Teaches you quite a lot about Victorian economics and how society was changing at that time.
In terms of format, it worked absolutely fine on my Kindle.
I'd definitely read more by Trollope.
Thomeena
I've been reading a lot of Trollope lately and have been enjoying him enormously, but this latest book just blew me away. Although it was written over a hundred years ago, it could have been written today, as it was set in a time when irresponsible financial speculation began to supplant traditional means of making money, with inevitable consequences. It's been described as his most biting satire, and I found it so. As it's one of his later books, it also features his growing concern with the impossible position Victorian society placed women, a problem all the major female characters struggle with in one way or another. And through it all Trollope manages to present a large and varied cast of characters and find time to put us in each of their heads, and even gain a bit of sympathy for the worst of them, who are bad out of ignorance more often than out of ill intent. It is certainly a society which, in Trollope's view, excelled at creating a raft of upper-class young men almost entirely lacking in skills, common sense, ambition, and empathy. No wonder they instinctively fall in line behind the loudest bully and think it the most natural thing in the world to participate in gigantic stock swindles--after all, a chap has to make money somehow.
Thomeena
I've been reading a lot of Trollope lately and have been enjoying him enormously, but this latest book just blew me away. Although it was written over a hundred years ago, it could have been written today, as it was set in a time when irresponsible financial speculation began to supplant traditional means of making money, with inevitable consequences. It's been described as his most biting satire, and I found it so. As it's one of his later books, it also features his growing concern with the impossible position Victorian society placed women, a problem all the major female characters struggle with in one way or another. And through it all Trollope manages to present a large and varied cast of characters and find time to put us in each of their heads, and even gain a bit of sympathy for the worst of them, who are bad out of ignorance more often than out of ill intent. It is certainly a society which, in Trollope's view, excelled at creating a raft of upper-class young men almost entirely lacking in skills, common sense, ambition, and empathy. No wonder they instinctively fall in line behind the loudest bully and think it the most natural thing in the world to participate in gigantic stock swindles--after all, a chap has to make money somehow.
FailCrew
One might hear the name Anthony Trollope and think of a very serious and dry writer of the Victorian age, but especially here he reads as easily and entertainingly as any modern writer. When I think of this book I think of the late Dominick Dunne another brilliant social satirist of the upper crust. Trollope seems to have perfected the classic tale of the immensely wealthy arriviste to whom the more established aristocracy seem to bend and capitulate all the while feigning horror at his coarseness. The tycoon is Melmotte and he arrives in London with two things all of London society wants, money and a daughter of the perfect age to marry. What he is on the hunt for is a cash poor gentleman with a noble title. Like Austen, Trollope writes of a time when marriage was more than just about love, it was a business. The real wild card is the daughter, she wants more than a good match she wants to, and does fall in love. But unfortunately the young mans's title is not good enough or old enough for her father and he has no money of his own. What follows is an engaging comedy of errors. This is a great read and an extraordinary look at a different time and place.
FailCrew
One might hear the name Anthony Trollope and think of a very serious and dry writer of the Victorian age, but especially here he reads as easily and entertainingly as any modern writer. When I think of this book I think of the late Dominick Dunne another brilliant social satirist of the upper crust. Trollope seems to have perfected the classic tale of the immensely wealthy arriviste to whom the more established aristocracy seem to bend and capitulate all the while feigning horror at his coarseness. The tycoon is Melmotte and he arrives in London with two things all of London society wants, money and a daughter of the perfect age to marry. What he is on the hunt for is a cash poor gentleman with a noble title. Like Austen, Trollope writes of a time when marriage was more than just about love, it was a business. The real wild card is the daughter, she wants more than a good match she wants to, and does fall in love. But unfortunately the young mans's title is not good enough or old enough for her father and he has no money of his own. What follows is an engaging comedy of errors. This is a great read and an extraordinary look at a different time and place.
Vut
"The Way we Live Now", a novel about wheeling and dealing in late 19th century London, surprised me. I don't know Trollope's work as well as other 19th century novelists, so I wasn't prepared for his urban sophistication and lack of sentimentality. It could be a story about the present day, though most literary novelists today are more concise than Trollope and would include more violence, profanity, and explicit sexuality than Trollope did.

One of the main question about this story of fraud and attempted cover up and love affairs gone awry is how to interpret the word "we" in the title. Trollope limits himself at least in this story in ways that Dickens or George Eliot or Balzac did not. Most of the characters are well-familiar with the prosperity of at least the upper middle class, many are ambitious for social advancement. I believe the word "we" in the title refers to people for whom fashionable society is second nature and also, by extension, to those whose lives depend on the decisions these influential folks make.

News reports tell us that there is plenty of corruption and fraud in high places today that affects the lives of ordinary people and Trollope portrays the shenanigans and weaknesses of similar people in his day. The word "we" in the title does not have universal application, however. Many folks, including some who are powerful and well-to-do, live within their means and do their best to keep from making trouble for their neighbors.

Still, this book is well worth reading. Plain as its presentation is, it certainly provokes thought.
Vut
"The Way we Live Now", a novel about wheeling and dealing in late 19th century London, surprised me. I don't know Trollope's work as well as other 19th century novelists, so I wasn't prepared for his urban sophistication and lack of sentimentality. It could be a story about the present day, though most literary novelists today are more concise than Trollope and would include more violence, profanity, and explicit sexuality than Trollope did.

One of the main question about this story of fraud and attempted cover up and love affairs gone awry is how to interpret the word "we" in the title. Trollope limits himself at least in this story in ways that Dickens or George Eliot or Balzac did not. Most of the characters are well-familiar with the prosperity of at least the upper middle class, many are ambitious for social advancement. I believe the word "we" in the title refers to people for whom fashionable society is second nature and also, by extension, to those whose lives depend on the decisions these influential folks make.

News reports tell us that there is plenty of corruption and fraud in high places today that affects the lives of ordinary people and Trollope portrays the shenanigans and weaknesses of similar people in his day. The word "we" in the title does not have universal application, however. Many folks, including some who are powerful and well-to-do, live within their means and do their best to keep from making trouble for their neighbors.

Still, this book is well worth reading. Plain as its presentation is, it certainly provokes thought.
Flathan
While the novel is no doubt overly long, the patient reader is rewarded by relationships with at least six females struggling against the status quo. These females come from all classes of English society of the late 19th century and share the burden that money and the lack of itj produces. They live in a world in which, as Henrietta Carberry says, males are forgiven of vices and women are expected to be virtuous. It's pleasure to see each of Trollope's women grasp the significance of money without surrendering to it. To witness young Ruby Ruggles, raised on Sheep's Acre Farm in rural Suffolk, escape the tyranny of a forced marriage to a man who adores her is delightful. The suitor has a big heart but no education or smarts. Ruby runs off to London, chasing a handsome young Sir Felix who's looking for a fling, but she survives, and makes her own decision about who to marry without her grandfather's 500 pounds or his fists forcing her. There are characters bemoaning the changing times, but Trollope celebrates this and hints that women will continue to press for more freedom and equality.
Flathan
While the novel is no doubt overly long, the patient reader is rewarded by relationships with at least six females struggling against the status quo. These females come from all classes of English society of the late 19th century and share the burden that money and the lack of itj produces. They live in a world in which, as Henrietta Carberry says, males are forgiven of vices and women are expected to be virtuous. It's pleasure to see each of Trollope's women grasp the significance of money without surrendering to it. To witness young Ruby Ruggles, raised on Sheep's Acre Farm in rural Suffolk, escape the tyranny of a forced marriage to a man who adores her is delightful. The suitor has a big heart but no education or smarts. Ruby runs off to London, chasing a handsome young Sir Felix who's looking for a fling, but she survives, and makes her own decision about who to marry without her grandfather's 500 pounds or his fists forcing her. There are characters bemoaning the changing times, but Trollope celebrates this and hints that women will continue to press for more freedom and equality.
Zahisan
Four stars for the story, two stars for this Kindle version which has intermittent BLANK pages, about 10 so far and I'm 75% through. Luckily I also got the Audible version, so I could fill in the blanks by listening, but it's annoying to have to do this.
Zahisan
Four stars for the story, two stars for this Kindle version which has intermittent BLANK pages, about 10 so far and I'm 75% through. Luckily I also got the Audible version, so I could fill in the blanks by listening, but it's annoying to have to do this.