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Why the Law Is So Perverse epub download

by Leo Katz


Conundrums, puzzles, and perversities: these are Leo Katz’s stock-in-trade, and in Why the Law Is So Perverse, he. .

Conundrums, puzzles, and perversities: these are Leo Katz’s stock-in-trade, and in Why the Law Is So Perverse, he focuses on four fundamental features of our legal system, all of which seem to not make sense on some level and to demand explanation. First, legal decisions are essentially made in an either/or fashion-guilty or not guilty, liable or not liable, either it’s a contract or it’s not-but reality is rarely as clear-cut.

Leo Katz, professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Why the Law Is So Perverse

Leo Katz, professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Why the Law Is So Perverse. Katz argues that certain seemingly inexplicable features of the law are the result of conflicts between multiple objectives that the law or the courts must trade off against each other. Katz also argues that structure of the law and how it is enforced are analogous to certain inevitable ambiguities of collective choice and voting theory.

Katz’s book explicates four fundamental legal paradoxes as the logical. consequence of the perspective that legal doctrines entail multi-criteria. certain win-win transactions? Why are there so many loopholes in the law? Why does so much of law have a dichotomous nature? Why does the law not. criminalize all that society morally condemns?

Conundrums, puzzles, and perversities: these are Leo Katz’s stock-in-trade, and in Why the Law Is So Perverse, he focuses on four fundamental features of our legal system, all of which seem to not make sense on some level and to demand explanation. Why aren’t there any in-between verdicts? Second, the law is full of loopholes. No one seems to like them, but somehow they cannot be made to disappear.

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Faculty Spotlight: Professor Leo Katz's Why the Law Is So Perverse (Penn Law News & Stories)

Faculty Spotlight: Professor Leo Katz's Why the Law Is So Perverse (Penn Law News & Stories). In Why the Law Is So Perverse, Leo Katz, Frank Carano Professor of Law, examines four fundamental features of the legal system, all of which seem to not make sense on some level and to demand explanation

Leo Katz wisely peppers his puzzles with humor, jokes, miniplays, and thoughtful warnings of difficult passages . Wall Street Journal) "Why the Law Is So Perverse is a terrific book. It is original in its general conception and creative in all the particularities of its execution

Leo Katz wisely peppers his puzzles with humor, jokes, miniplays, and thoughtful warnings of difficult passages to come (along with welcome invitations to skip ahead) that temper this otherwise demanding volume and make following the twists and turns of the argument well worth the challenge. And for those for whom puzzling is a pleasure in itself, the book will be a feast. It is original in its general conception and creative in all the particularities of its execution. And in bringing the social choice argument to the law and legal problems, Leo Katz has made an important and novel academic contribution.

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Our topic for today is his book from 2011 - Why th. Leo Katz: though a significant one. But on the plus side, if you need a kidney and you would die if you don’t get a donation, or you’d be limited t. We’re going to start with some examples of what you mean by perverse - why the law is perverse. And I want to start to start with the kidney club. But on the plus side, if you need a kidney and you would die if you don’t get a donation, or you’d be limited to dialysis, which has significant downsides, you are protected against that because there’s a donor. So it seems like it’s eminently desirable, or lots of people might want to join such a kidney club, because it’s a bargain that everybody is going to benefit from.

Why the Law Is So Perverse - eBook. Why the Law is So Perverse Leo Katz Thursday, April 26, 2012 8:12 PM Why do I read books like this? I thought the title was interesting. Leo Katz, a law professor, explains some paradoxes in law with the theory of social choice, an idea developed from analysis of voting systems.

Conundrums, puzzles, and perversities: these are Leo Katz’s stock-in-trade, and in Why the Law Is So Perverse, he focuses on four fundamental features of our legal system, all of which seem to not make sense on some level and to demand explanation. First, legal decisions are essentially made in an either/or fashion—guilty or not guilty, liable or not liable, either it’s a contract or it’s not—but reality is rarely as clear-cut. Why aren’t there any in-between verdicts? Second, the law is full of loopholes. No one seems to like them, but somehow they cannot be made to disappear. Why? Third, legal systems are loath to punish certain kinds of highly immoral conduct while prosecuting other far less pernicious behaviors. What makes a villainy a felony? Finally, why does the law often prohibit what are sometimes called win-win transactions, such as organ sales or surrogacy contracts?

           

Katz asserts that these perversions arise out of a cluster of logical difficulties related to multicriterial decision making. The discovery of these difficulties dates back to Condorcet’s eighteenth-century exploration of voting rules, which marked the beginning of what we know today as social choice theory. Condorcet’s voting cycles, Arrow’s Theorem, Sen’s Libertarian Paradox—every seeming perversity of the law turns out to be the counterpart of one of the many voting paradoxes that lie at the heart of social choice. Katz’s lucid explanations and apt examples show why they resist any easy resolutions.

           

The New York Times Book Review called Katz’s first book “a fascinating romp through the philosophical side of the law.” Why the Law Is So Perverse is sure to provide its readers a similar experience.

Why the Law Is So Perverse epub download

ISBN13: 978-0226426037

ISBN: 0226426033

Author: Leo Katz

Category: Law

Subcategory: Legal Theory & Systems

Language: English

Publisher: University of Chicago Press (September 1, 2011)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB size: 1980 kb

FB2 size: 1110 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 659

Other Formats: azw doc mobi mbr

Related to Why the Law Is So Perverse ePub books

Tejora
This book sparkles. The lucid prose, combined with the shrewd, provocative insights, leaves left me pondering anomalies of every day experience. As Professor Katz highlights, convincingly, the internal inconsistencies in our laws reflect, and reinforce, the internal inconsistencies embedded within each of us -- and all of us. A deft touch that digs deeply into the laws we enact and live by. I look forward to reading more from Professor Katz.

Michael H. Friedman
Philadelphia, PA
Tejora
This book sparkles. The lucid prose, combined with the shrewd, provocative insights, leaves left me pondering anomalies of every day experience. As Professor Katz highlights, convincingly, the internal inconsistencies in our laws reflect, and reinforce, the internal inconsistencies embedded within each of us -- and all of us. A deft touch that digs deeply into the laws we enact and live by. I look forward to reading more from Professor Katz.

Michael H. Friedman
Philadelphia, PA
Keel
very interesting and educational
Keel
very interesting and educational
Dordred
Would recommend this book to any law student. Plan to use the book in an undergraduate legal studies class. Deals in an accessible fashion with some "deep" subjects.
Dordred
Would recommend this book to any law student. Plan to use the book in an undergraduate legal studies class. Deals in an accessible fashion with some "deep" subjects.
IGOT
The topic is a great one, and there's enough depth to make the book useful. The perspective is entirely manly, though, without even a hint that feminist epistemology might even exist. Also, the author is apparently a law professor, but he can't seem to tell the difference between ontology and definition. Maybe he's trying to be thought-provoking, but the bogus arguments get pretty annoying after a while.
IGOT
The topic is a great one, and there's enough depth to make the book useful. The perspective is entirely manly, though, without even a hint that feminist epistemology might even exist. Also, the author is apparently a law professor, but he can't seem to tell the difference between ontology and definition. Maybe he's trying to be thought-provoking, but the bogus arguments get pretty annoying after a while.
Mr_TrOlOlO
This book talks about puzzles in the law, with very interesting stories, and very good reasoning. The author gives powerful argument for the intricacy and perversity of the law, but just wasted many pages on tiny details.
Mr_TrOlOlO
This book talks about puzzles in the law, with very interesting stories, and very good reasoning. The author gives powerful argument for the intricacy and perversity of the law, but just wasted many pages on tiny details.
luisRED
I am a fan of all of Leo Katz's books -- you can learn more from each page of this then many casebooks combined. Despite the engaging and entertaining style of the book, it is a deep and important work of legal theory.

Very roughly, Katz argues that the often strange structure of the law has more to do with Arrow's impossibility theorem then people have realized. Its an important idea and he delivers it in a very readable and enjoyable way.
luisRED
I am a fan of all of Leo Katz's books -- you can learn more from each page of this then many casebooks combined. Despite the engaging and entertaining style of the book, it is a deep and important work of legal theory.

Very roughly, Katz argues that the often strange structure of the law has more to do with Arrow's impossibility theorem then people have realized. Its an important idea and he delivers it in a very readable and enjoyable way.