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Seven Years in Tibet epub download

by Heinrich Harrer


Seven Years in Tibet. I am happy that his book Seven Years in Tibet which gives a true and vivid picture of Tibet before 1959 is being reprinted when there is a renewed interest on Tibet.

Seven Years in Tibet. For the British, and, indeed, I think for most Europeans, Tibet has during the last fifty years held a growing and a particular fascination. In 1904, Younghusband, in a campaign scarcely matched in the annals of war either for its administrative difficulties or for the combination of audacity and humanity with which it was conducted, marched to Lhasa and subdued Tibet.

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Seven Years in Tibet: My Life Before, During and After (1952; German: Sieben Jahre in Tibet. Mein Leben am Hofe des Dalai Lama; 1954 in English) is an autobiographical travel book written by Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer based on his real life experiences in Tibet between 1944 and 1951 during the Second World War and the interim period before the Communist Chinese People's Liberation Army invaded Tibet in 1950.

Seven Years in Tibet has been added to your Cart. Heinrich Harrer was born in 1912, in Carinthia. Harrer currently resides in Liechtenstein.

Heinrich Harrer, already one of the greatest mountaineers of his time, was climbing in the Himalayas when war .

Heinrich Harrer, already one of the greatest mountaineers of his time, was climbing in the Himalayas when war broke out in Europe.

Heinrich Harrer – mountaineer; prisoner of war; explorer; friend of kings and gods – and not forgetting a Nazi. His books (The White Spider and Seven Years in Tibet) are international best sellers yet they only touch on the early part of his life. Harrer deals with his early exploits – the first ascent of the North Face of the Eiger no less – as almost a mere preface to his autobiography, no doubt realising that most who read the book will have already his famous book, The White Spider.

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True story of Heinrich Harrer, an Austrian mountain climber who became friends with the Dalai Lama at the time of China's takeover of Tibet

True story of Heinrich Harrer, an Austrian mountain climber who became friends with the Dalai Lama at the time of China's takeover of Tibet. Director: Jean-Jacques Annaud. Writers: Heinrich Harrer (book), Becky Johnston (screenplay). While he's doing his mountain climbing Germany of which Austria is now part of marches into Poland and World War II begins. Harrer and his party are interred as enemy aliens.

Seven Years in Tibet - Heinrich Harrer. Outbreak of war and our un-I join up with hese embraces me-We march by night and ride by day-Trout and cigarettes-The Ganges and Pilgrims’ Road-Recaptured-I escape once more, alone-Again recaptured. I now set to work to learn a little Hindustani, Tibetan and Japanese; and devoured all sorts of travel books on Asia, which I found in the library, especially those dealing with the districts on my prospective route. I made extracts from these works and took copies of the most important maps.

Heinrich Harrer, already a famous mountaineer and Olympic ski champion, was caught by the outbreak of World War II while climbing the Himalyas. Being an Austrian, he was interned in India. On his third attempt, he succeeded in escaping from the internment camp and fled into Tibet. After a series of experiences in a country never crossed before by a Westerner, Harrer reached the Forbidden City of Lhasa. He stayed there for seven years, learned the language and acquired a greater understanding of Tibet and the Tibetans. He became friend and tutor to the young Dalai Lama and finally accompanied him into India when he was put to flight by the Red Chinese invasion. This film tie-in edition includes an epilogue from the author describing his return to Tibet in the 1990s.

Seven Years in Tibet epub download

ISBN13: 978-0874779035

ISBN: 0874779030

Author: Heinrich Harrer

Category: History

Subcategory: World

Language: English

Publisher: Tarcher; First Edition edition (September 29, 1997)

Pages: 1 pages

ePUB size: 1117 kb

FB2 size: 1822 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 719

Other Formats: azw lit lrf mobi

Related to Seven Years in Tibet ePub books

Endieyab
The story of a dramatic escape by Heinrich Harrer and his climbing associate Peter Aufschnaiter from and Indian internment camp after their arrest by the British when they were attempting to climb Nanga Parbat, at the outbreak of World War II. The book details their journey across Tibet including their near demise with the Khampas, before reaching Lhasa and in my view, discovering a way of looking at life very different to our own. The book then goes on to cover Heinrich Harrer's relationship with the Young Dalai Lama and the Dalai Lama's enthusiasm to learn more about the world he lived in. The book also provides an insight into life in Lhasa before the coming of the Chinese. Finishing with the onset of the Chinese occupation and the flight of the Dalai Lama, I found this to be a very well written book and it can be seen throughout the book how the very personality of the author changes from how I would describe as something not to far short of arrogance at the beginning to someone who cared very much about a people who just wanted to be able to get on with a way of live that had lasted for centuries and which to a great degree they were content with, but due to circumstances beyond their control, they were unable to do. I read this book after visiting Tibet myself in 1998 and the contrast between the Tibet described in the book and that which I saw was a sharp one. Heinrich Harrer himself returned to Tibet in 1982 and observed the changes himself (detailed in 'Return to Tibet', more of a thesis than a story, but nevertheless essential reading after 'Seven Years in Tibet'), noting the loss of much he had held dear when he was there in the 1940's. If you Heinrich Harrer's true story of Tibet, read the book - the film adaptation does not fit the storyline of the book and Heinrich Harrer himself is portrayed in a much poorer light early in the film than the book, which I feel is not fair. Another glaring error is that the film shows Heinrich Harrer in Lhasa after the Chinese arrive - Heinrich Harrer and the inaugerated Dalai Lama had already left Lhasa before the Chinese arrival.
Endieyab
The story of a dramatic escape by Heinrich Harrer and his climbing associate Peter Aufschnaiter from and Indian internment camp after their arrest by the British when they were attempting to climb Nanga Parbat, at the outbreak of World War II. The book details their journey across Tibet including their near demise with the Khampas, before reaching Lhasa and in my view, discovering a way of looking at life very different to our own. The book then goes on to cover Heinrich Harrer's relationship with the Young Dalai Lama and the Dalai Lama's enthusiasm to learn more about the world he lived in. The book also provides an insight into life in Lhasa before the coming of the Chinese. Finishing with the onset of the Chinese occupation and the flight of the Dalai Lama, I found this to be a very well written book and it can be seen throughout the book how the very personality of the author changes from how I would describe as something not to far short of arrogance at the beginning to someone who cared very much about a people who just wanted to be able to get on with a way of live that had lasted for centuries and which to a great degree they were content with, but due to circumstances beyond their control, they were unable to do. I read this book after visiting Tibet myself in 1998 and the contrast between the Tibet described in the book and that which I saw was a sharp one. Heinrich Harrer himself returned to Tibet in 1982 and observed the changes himself (detailed in 'Return to Tibet', more of a thesis than a story, but nevertheless essential reading after 'Seven Years in Tibet'), noting the loss of much he had held dear when he was there in the 1940's. If you Heinrich Harrer's true story of Tibet, read the book - the film adaptation does not fit the storyline of the book and Heinrich Harrer himself is portrayed in a much poorer light early in the film than the book, which I feel is not fair. Another glaring error is that the film shows Heinrich Harrer in Lhasa after the Chinese arrive - Heinrich Harrer and the inaugerated Dalai Lama had already left Lhasa before the Chinese arrival.
Quemal
I read this a long time ago, and remembered enjoying it. It was a pleasure to read again. Harrer did an excellent job of observing Tibetan life from 1944 to 1950 being careful to keep his own personal opinions/beliefs out of the way. By the time he was forced to leave because of the Chinese invasion, he was deeply attached to the people and the country. Though he didn't actually meet the Dalai Lama until late in his stay in Lhasa, Harrer and the young boy (he was just 15/16 years old) became fast friends and remained so throughout Harrer's life. He tried to visit the Dalai Lama at least once every year or two and several times the Dalai Lama visited Harrer in his own home.

This is a very special glimpse into a way of life that was about to come to a sudden and violent end. It is difficult to comprehend that over 6000 monasteries were destroyed and only 12 remain. Thousands of years worth of Buddhist art and literature was destroyed or sold.

If you want to know a little about The Roof of the World, then read Seven Years in Tibet. (Forget the movie.)
Quemal
I read this a long time ago, and remembered enjoying it. It was a pleasure to read again. Harrer did an excellent job of observing Tibetan life from 1944 to 1950 being careful to keep his own personal opinions/beliefs out of the way. By the time he was forced to leave because of the Chinese invasion, he was deeply attached to the people and the country. Though he didn't actually meet the Dalai Lama until late in his stay in Lhasa, Harrer and the young boy (he was just 15/16 years old) became fast friends and remained so throughout Harrer's life. He tried to visit the Dalai Lama at least once every year or two and several times the Dalai Lama visited Harrer in his own home.

This is a very special glimpse into a way of life that was about to come to a sudden and violent end. It is difficult to comprehend that over 6000 monasteries were destroyed and only 12 remain. Thousands of years worth of Buddhist art and literature was destroyed or sold.

If you want to know a little about The Roof of the World, then read Seven Years in Tibet. (Forget the movie.)
Arlana
This book has two distinct parts: [1] the difficult journey that Heinrich Harrer (author) and Peter Aufschnaiter had reaching the Tibetan capital, Lhasa and [2] Heinrich’s experiences and observation of Tibetan life while living in Lhasa.

In the first part, their difficulties were many – and it was, among other things, fortuitous breaks in the weather and chance encounters with kind Tibetan nomads that allowed them to even survive the journey. During this time, you see how difficult it was to travel at “the top of the world”, and you get a glimpse of the lives of the average Tibetan.

In the second part, Heinrich (and Peter) soon become welcome guests of the Tibetan upper class. At this point, the book switches to glimpses of the life of the upper class, the religious pageantry displayed for the devout (and superstitious) multitudes and cloistered life of the Dali Lama.

The book ends with the Chinese conquest of Tibet – and so the start, I assume, of the wholesale dismantling of the rich historical Tibetan culture described in this book.
Arlana
This book has two distinct parts: [1] the difficult journey that Heinrich Harrer (author) and Peter Aufschnaiter had reaching the Tibetan capital, Lhasa and [2] Heinrich’s experiences and observation of Tibetan life while living in Lhasa.

In the first part, their difficulties were many – and it was, among other things, fortuitous breaks in the weather and chance encounters with kind Tibetan nomads that allowed them to even survive the journey. During this time, you see how difficult it was to travel at “the top of the world”, and you get a glimpse of the lives of the average Tibetan.

In the second part, Heinrich (and Peter) soon become welcome guests of the Tibetan upper class. At this point, the book switches to glimpses of the life of the upper class, the religious pageantry displayed for the devout (and superstitious) multitudes and cloistered life of the Dali Lama.

The book ends with the Chinese conquest of Tibet – and so the start, I assume, of the wholesale dismantling of the rich historical Tibetan culture described in this book.
santa
This classic book provides an intimate portrait of the history, religion, and culture of Tibet. Sadly, it is a portrait of a Tibet that will never exist again. Like a beautiful jewel lost to humanity, Tibet shown for centuries, but is now lost. Well worth reading, several times. I have looked up many of the places and people in the text. Written by someone who was there, with first hand descriptions, this book is unique and a true treasure.
santa
This classic book provides an intimate portrait of the history, religion, and culture of Tibet. Sadly, it is a portrait of a Tibet that will never exist again. Like a beautiful jewel lost to humanity, Tibet shown for centuries, but is now lost. Well worth reading, several times. I have looked up many of the places and people in the text. Written by someone who was there, with first hand descriptions, this book is unique and a true treasure.
Opithris
For various reasons I was reluctant to start reading this book. However, once I started reading it, I could not put it down.
The author obviously loved Tibet. You can feel his love of this country and the respect of its traditions and people.
Very educational and enlightening book.
I am amazed at what he and his friend had to endure in order to achieve their dream of seeing the Forbidden City.
Opithris
For various reasons I was reluctant to start reading this book. However, once I started reading it, I could not put it down.
The author obviously loved Tibet. You can feel his love of this country and the respect of its traditions and people.
Very educational and enlightening book.
I am amazed at what he and his friend had to endure in order to achieve their dream of seeing the Forbidden City.
Bolv
This book is a rare look at a little known world and it's people.
The Author gives his own life experiences of the journey to and from
Tibet. Recommended Reading for all.
Bolv
This book is a rare look at a little known world and it's people.
The Author gives his own life experiences of the journey to and from
Tibet. Recommended Reading for all.
Laitchai
At once a marvelous adventure story and anthropological study of Tibetan culture and customs before China's brutal cultural genocide. Herr was one of very few Europeans to not just visit this mysterious Himalayan land, but to live, work and blend into the very life of Lhasa, "The forbidden city", and capital of Tibet. Whereby becoming not only a tutor, but life long friend of the XIV Dalai Lama.
Laitchai
At once a marvelous adventure story and anthropological study of Tibetan culture and customs before China's brutal cultural genocide. Herr was one of very few Europeans to not just visit this mysterious Himalayan land, but to live, work and blend into the very life of Lhasa, "The forbidden city", and capital of Tibet. Whereby becoming not only a tutor, but life long friend of the XIV Dalai Lama.