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Islam and Democracy: Fear of the Modern World epub download

by Fatema Mernissi,Mary Jo Lakeland


Other Books by Fatema Mernissi. Translated by. Mary jo lakeland.

Other Books by Fatema Mernissi. The Veil and the Male Elite: A Feminist Interpretation of Women’s Rights in Islam. Many of the designations used by manufacturers and sellers to distinguish their products are claimed as trademarks.

Is Islam compatible with democracy? Must fundamentalism win out in the Middle East, or will democracy ever be. .The Moroccan scholar Fatima Mernissi is frequently upheld as the Muslim world's leading feminist thinker.

Is Islam compatible with democracy? Must fundamentalism win out in the Middle East, or will democracy ever be possible? In this now-classic book. Her book 'Beyond the Veil' has become standard college-reading for most people investigating the subject of women's rights in the Islamic tradition. This book, however, 'Islam and Democracy,' is a disorganized rant. One suspects that many of these "chapters" were intended for individual essays, or perhaps were rushed into publication before they could take coherent shape as a book. Mernissi is all over the place.

Fatema Mernissi has more ideas per book than any other thinker in the Middle East. Her later works increasingly integrate her brilliant ideas into sustained and compelling discourse that is very worthy of attention. Laurence O. Michalak, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, University of California, Berkeley . Fatema Mernissi has taken a steady, sustained look into the Muslim heart and emerged with brilliant insights into its fears of the West and of democracy, as well as its love-hate relationship toward its past. She is a psychiatrist of her culture, with understanding for the problems and.

2002: Islam and Democracy: Fear of the Modern World. 1989: Doing Daily Battle: Interviews with Moroccan Women translated by Mary Jo Lakeland. Obituary on Morocco World News. Chronological Overview of books by Fatema Mernissi. New York: Basic Books. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. Announcement of the Asturias Prize, 2003. Interview: El País (Spanish) 6-7-2008.

Fatima Mernissi, Mary Jo Lakeland. Our pre-Islamic past is called the jahiliyya, the time of ignorance, and as a result is subjected to the hijab that also veils the feminine. And the past and the feminine are two poles for reflection on that source of all terrors: difference.

Islam and Democracy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Islam and Democracy: Fear of the Modern World as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Is Islam compatible with democracy? Must fundamentalism win out.

Fatema Mernissi, a Moroccan sociologist who was one of the founders of Islamic feminism, whose work included studies of the sexual politics of Islamic Scripture and a book based on her childhood in a domestic harem, died on Nov. 30 in Rabat.

Islam and Democracy : Fear of the Modern World with New Introduction. Is Islam compatible with democracy? Must fundamentalism win out in the Middle East, or will democracy ever be possible? In this now-classic book, Islamic sociologist Fatima Mernissi explores the ways in which progressive Muslims-defenders of democracy, feminists, and others trying to resist fundamentalism-must use the same sacred texts as Muslims who use them for violent ends, to prove different views.

Is Islam compatible with democracy? Must fundamentalism win out in the Middle East, or will democracy ever be possible? In her groundbreaking new book, Moroccan sociologist Fatima Mernissi explores the ways in which people on dramatically opposing sides - feminists an.

Is Islam compatible with democracy? Must fundamentalism win out in the Middle East, or will democracy ever be possible? In her groundbreaking new book, Moroccan sociologist Fatima Mernissi explores the ways in which people on dramatically opposing sides - feminists and defenders of democracy versus violent fundamentalists - must use the same sacred texts to prove different views

Is Islam compatible with democracy? Must fundamentalism win out in the Middle East, or will democracy ever be possible? In this now-classic book, Islamic sociologist Fatima Mernissi explores the ways in which progressive Muslims--defenders of democracy, feminists, and others trying to resist fundamentalism--must use the same sacred texts as Muslims who use them for violent ends, to prove different views. Updated with a new introduction by the author written in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States, Islam and Democracy serves as a guide to the players moving the pieces on the rather grim Muslim chessboard. It shines new light on the people behind today's terrorist acts and raises provocative questions about the possibilities for democracy and human rights in the Islamic world. Essential reading for anyone interested in the politics of the Middle East today, Islam and Democracy is as timely now as it was upon its initial, celebrated publication.

Islam and Democracy: Fear of the Modern World epub download

ISBN13: 978-0738207452

ISBN: 0738207454

Author: Fatema Mernissi,Mary Jo Lakeland

Category: History

Subcategory: World

Language: English

Publisher: Basic Books; Reissue edition (April 2002)

Pages: 197 pages

ePUB size: 1490 kb

FB2 size: 1562 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 643

Other Formats: doc mobi lrf lit

Related to Islam and Democracy: Fear of the Modern World ePub books

Nidora
I'd recommend this book for both Muslims and Christians.

Muslims, because -- in spite of what Al-Qaeda (al-Zawahiri and ben Laden) says -- there is the hope, perhaps in Sufi Islam only, to find in Islam an accommodation with Democracy and the West.

Christians, because here Fatema shows perhaps the only way that might happen: Muslim women being the catalyst for change that represents advancement.

Alas, there is about as much chance of this happening as the Pope permitting Catholic clergy to marry. Yes, Ms Memissi may be critical of Islam -- as one female muslim I know complained, not liking her because of the criticism; nevertheless, the criticism is justified.
Nidora
I'd recommend this book for both Muslims and Christians.

Muslims, because -- in spite of what Al-Qaeda (al-Zawahiri and ben Laden) says -- there is the hope, perhaps in Sufi Islam only, to find in Islam an accommodation with Democracy and the West.

Christians, because here Fatema shows perhaps the only way that might happen: Muslim women being the catalyst for change that represents advancement.

Alas, there is about as much chance of this happening as the Pope permitting Catholic clergy to marry. Yes, Ms Memissi may be critical of Islam -- as one female muslim I know complained, not liking her because of the criticism; nevertheless, the criticism is justified.
Fordrelis
Fatima Mernissi has provides an interesting, academic and social perspective of Islam and it's fear of democracy; while providing yet a solid argument for the need for Islam to embrace democracy. She persuasively argues that the positive aspects and practice of Islam would flourish if the people of Islam were to choose their faith, rather than out of ignorace or fear. The positive aspects would provide no threat to other cultures and religions, as that is true Islam. With myself being of the west, Mernissi gave me my first insights into my own stereotyping and misunderstanding of Islam that many in the West both believe in and sometimes act on. She is provocative to all who read her, whether one is Arabic, Middle Eastern, European or American. Her scholarly and simultaneously interesting work is also a must for women who are either Islamic or those who are not.
Fordrelis
Fatima Mernissi has provides an interesting, academic and social perspective of Islam and it's fear of democracy; while providing yet a solid argument for the need for Islam to embrace democracy. She persuasively argues that the positive aspects and practice of Islam would flourish if the people of Islam were to choose their faith, rather than out of ignorace or fear. The positive aspects would provide no threat to other cultures and religions, as that is true Islam. With myself being of the west, Mernissi gave me my first insights into my own stereotyping and misunderstanding of Islam that many in the West both believe in and sometimes act on. She is provocative to all who read her, whether one is Arabic, Middle Eastern, European or American. Her scholarly and simultaneously interesting work is also a must for women who are either Islamic or those who are not.
FRAY
I have three of Mernissi's books and they are all definitely worth the money and the time reading. Mernissi is one of the most insightful and eye-opening authors on female social issues in Islam. I used all three of her books for a college term paper and she helped me get a great grade! These books also stand the test of time I find them to be interesting every time I go back to them. Two thumbs up!
FRAY
I have three of Mernissi's books and they are all definitely worth the money and the time reading. Mernissi is one of the most insightful and eye-opening authors on female social issues in Islam. I used all three of her books for a college term paper and she helped me get a great grade! These books also stand the test of time I find them to be interesting every time I go back to them. Two thumbs up!
Mojar
Read for Seminary class great resource
Mojar
Read for Seminary class great resource
Runehammer
The Moroccan scholar Fatima Mernissi is frequently upheld as the Muslim world's leading feminist thinker. Her book 'Beyond the Veil' has become standard college-reading for most people investigating the subject of women's rights in the Islamic tradition. This book, however, 'Islam and Democracy,' is a disorganized rant.
One suspects that many of these "chapters" were intended for individual essays, or perhaps were rushed into publication before they could take coherent shape as a book. Mernissi is all over the place. In the expanse of five or six pages she might make great sweeping claims about the Muslim sense of powerlessness, then claim that that powerlessness is not universal at all, but rather uniquely female, then blame Muslim despots for tyrannizing their people and preventing democracy, then blame the west for attacking and trying to overthrow Muslim despots (i.e., Saddam Hussein.) Then a few pages later she might drag out apocryphal stores of the assassination of medieval Caliphs, to demonstrate that Muslims leaders have never been strong enough!
Mernissi lavishes mythology upon fact, to the point where it is impossible to tell whether or not her use of examples is to be trusted. Despite the scientific-sounding nature of its title, 'Islam and Democracy' reads more like literary criticism: an argument about the meanings of fictions, which are then applied to the world and linked by some grand theory which - lo and behold - can be `proven' by using more fiction as examples. It should not be surprising to find that excerpts from the Arabian Nights recur over and over again in her text.
Equally troubling is the fact that her main critique of Islam centers upon what she sees as its lack of respect for individual creativity and freedom - its adhesion to a slavish and unquestioning belief in scripture, yet she samples liberally from the Hadith - stories about the life of Muhammad and the early Muslims that even many Imams are skeptical of. In other words, she expects the reader to believe that her selection of scripture disproves other peoples' selections of scripture. And she can't even get them all straight: relating the story of an early Muslim martyr, she claims in one sentence that he bore his torture "and didn't utter a word" (20), and two sentences later, claims he was chanting the whole time.
In spite of all this, reading this book is still an education, of sorts. Much of this is due to the translation skills of Mary Jo Lakeland, who gives us a tour de force of Arabic etymology, and does great justice to the complex layers of meaning of this language, whose root words are so flexible and susceptible to subtle manipulation. If you would like to get a sense - albeit a dreadfully confused sense - of where one pole of Muslim critical theory stood in the 1990s, then this could be a useful text. If, however, you were hoping to learn something substantial about Islam and Democracy, you will be disappointed.
Runehammer
The Moroccan scholar Fatima Mernissi is frequently upheld as the Muslim world's leading feminist thinker. Her book 'Beyond the Veil' has become standard college-reading for most people investigating the subject of women's rights in the Islamic tradition. This book, however, 'Islam and Democracy,' is a disorganized rant.
One suspects that many of these "chapters" were intended for individual essays, or perhaps were rushed into publication before they could take coherent shape as a book. Mernissi is all over the place. In the expanse of five or six pages she might make great sweeping claims about the Muslim sense of powerlessness, then claim that that powerlessness is not universal at all, but rather uniquely female, then blame Muslim despots for tyrannizing their people and preventing democracy, then blame the west for attacking and trying to overthrow Muslim despots (i.e., Saddam Hussein.) Then a few pages later she might drag out apocryphal stores of the assassination of medieval Caliphs, to demonstrate that Muslims leaders have never been strong enough!
Mernissi lavishes mythology upon fact, to the point where it is impossible to tell whether or not her use of examples is to be trusted. Despite the scientific-sounding nature of its title, 'Islam and Democracy' reads more like literary criticism: an argument about the meanings of fictions, which are then applied to the world and linked by some grand theory which - lo and behold - can be `proven' by using more fiction as examples. It should not be surprising to find that excerpts from the Arabian Nights recur over and over again in her text.
Equally troubling is the fact that her main critique of Islam centers upon what she sees as its lack of respect for individual creativity and freedom - its adhesion to a slavish and unquestioning belief in scripture, yet she samples liberally from the Hadith - stories about the life of Muhammad and the early Muslims that even many Imams are skeptical of. In other words, she expects the reader to believe that her selection of scripture disproves other peoples' selections of scripture. And she can't even get them all straight: relating the story of an early Muslim martyr, she claims in one sentence that he bore his torture "and didn't utter a word" (20), and two sentences later, claims he was chanting the whole time.
In spite of all this, reading this book is still an education, of sorts. Much of this is due to the translation skills of Mary Jo Lakeland, who gives us a tour de force of Arabic etymology, and does great justice to the complex layers of meaning of this language, whose root words are so flexible and susceptible to subtle manipulation. If you would like to get a sense - albeit a dreadfully confused sense - of where one pole of Muslim critical theory stood in the 1990s, then this could be a useful text. If, however, you were hoping to learn something substantial about Islam and Democracy, you will be disappointed.
Doath
Very interesting and enlightening book.
Doath
Very interesting and enlightening book.