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Malta: The Last Great Siege 1940 - 1943 epub download

by David Wragg


The Siege of Malta by Hitler and Mussolini, which lasted over two years from June 11, 1940, to November 20, 1942, was a pivotal victory for the Allies and an overwhelming one, but one gained at a great cost in terms of people killed, wounded, almost starved to death, and sickened from resulting.

The Siege of Malta by Hitler and Mussolini, which lasted over two years from June 11, 1940, to November 20, 1942, was a pivotal victory for the Allies and an overwhelming one, but one gained at a great cost in terms of people killed, wounded, almost starved to death, and sickened from resulting diseases, and the destruction of the island’s infrastructure. To get an idea about the cost in blood and treasure for the enemy, here is an excerpt from the Wragg book: On 26 May 1943, for the first time in almost three years, a convoy arrived in Gibraltar from Alexandria without losing a single ship.

Start by marking Malta: The Last Great Siege 1940-1943 as Want to Read . This was indeed a siege involving every man and woman on the Island.

Start by marking Malta: The Last Great Siege 1940-1943 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Malta: The Last Great. The result is an inspiring book worthy of the courage shown by the Islanders and their defenders.

The result is an inspiring book worthy of the courage shown by the Islanders and their defenders. Publisher: Pen and Sword;Leo Cooper. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Malta : the last great siege : the George Cross Island's battle for survival 1940-1943. Pen and Sword;Leo Cooper.

Tell us if something is incorrect. Malta : The Last Great Siege 1940 - 1943.

THE LAST GREAT SIEGE 1940-1943 by D Wragg. An excellent detailed book covering the British attempt to recapture Tobruk from the Germans in September 1942. Published 2000, S/C, 138 pages.

The Siege of Malta is a historical novel by Walter Scott written from 1831 to 1832 and first published posthumously in 2008. It tells the story of events surrounding the Great Siege of Malta by the Ottoman Turks in 1565

The Siege of Malta is a historical novel by Walter Scott written from 1831 to 1832 and first published posthumously in 2008. It tells the story of events surrounding the Great Siege of Malta by the Ottoman Turks in 1565.

The strategic importance of Malta sitting astride both the Axis and Allied supply routes in the Mediterranean was obvious to both sides during WW2. As a result the Island became the focal point in a prolonged and dreadful struggle that cost the lives of thousands of servicemen and civilians. After setting the scene for the action, this book tells the story of the Island's stand against the might of the Axis powers that led to the unprecedented award of the George Cross to the whole island by King George VI. It not only covers the struggle by the British and Maltese forces on the ground but the vicious fighting in the skies above. This was indeed a siege involving every man and woman on the Island.David Wragg tells the story using many first -hand accounts and yet skillfully explains the strategic situation. The result is an inspiring book worthy of the courage shown by the Islanders and their defenders.

Malta: The Last Great Siege 1940 - 1943 epub download

ISBN13: 978-0850529906

ISBN: 0850529905

Author: David Wragg

Category: History

Subcategory: Military

Language: English

Publisher: Pen and Sword (December 19, 2003)

Pages: 224 pages

ePUB size: 1590 kb

FB2 size: 1759 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 687

Other Formats: lrf rtf mobi txt

Related to Malta: The Last Great Siege 1940 - 1943 ePub books

WtePSeLNaGAyko
In January and February of 1942, an island fortress in the middle of the Mediterranean called Malta was attacked relentlessly by the Luftwaffe, Hitler’s air armada, and the Regis Aeronautica, Mussolini’s fighters and bombers. A relentless blitz with an average of eight airborne attacks a day, each attack employing over a hundred aircraft, over 150 in the last two weeks of January alone, pummeled the Maltese people and the British forces tasked with defending them on their tiny but strategic island. The story of these intrepid individuals and the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy engaged in the conflict is detailed in two books, one by Ernle Bradford, published in 1986, called Siege: Malta, 1940-1943, and the other by David Wragg, published originally in 2004, called Malta: The Last Great Siege 1940-1943.

The Siege of Malta by Hitler and Mussolini, which lasted over two years from June 11, 1940, to November 20, 1942, was a pivotal victory for the Allies and an overwhelming one, but one gained at a great cost in terms of people killed, wounded, almost starved to death, and sickened from resulting diseases, and the destruction of the island’s infrastructure. To get an idea about the cost in blood and treasure for the enemy, here is an excerpt from the Wragg book:

“On 26 May 1943, for the first time in almost three years, a convoy arrived in Gibraltar from Alexandria without losing a single ship. Italy had surrendered. The Mediterranean was no longer ‘Mare Nostrum’, ‘Our Sea’, to the Italians. The effort to make it so had cost Germany and Italy almost a million dead and wounded, as well as 8,000 aircraft, 1,500 of them shot down over Malta, 6,000 guns, 2,500 tanks and 70,000 motor vehicles, in addition to 2,400,000 tons of shipping. By contrast, the Allies had lost just two percent of the ships sent into the Mediterranean, with 70,000 men dead and wounded.”

Malta was crucial to the British (when they stood alone against the Nazis) and subsequently to the Allies. On a secrecy level, it was critical in the intelligence war against the Axis powers as a listening post in the Allies Ultra network that intercepted enemy communications, and on a war strategy level, it was essential for the defeat of Nazi general Erwin Rommel in North Africa. The British and Maltese fighting teams saved their island fortress and were instrumental in halting Mussolini and Hitler’s race to capture the Suez Canal in North Africa. The canal was a short sea route between Britain and Middle East oil supplies. Rather than sailing around the southern tip of Africa, a route that was a much longer and prone to deadly U-boat attack, the Allies used the canal to ship troops, equipment, fuel, and raw materials around the world to where they were needed.

My wife Catherine and I have been to Malta three times on various cruise vacations, and although we learned a bit about the bravery of the Maltese people during World War II, their valor in that war never came as vividly alive as in these books. Like their ancestors, who defeated the Ottoman Empire in 1565 thus saving Christianity and Europe from the Moslem Turks, the Maltese are gentle and God-loving people who become fierce and clever warriors when they have their backs against the wall. And they certainly had their backs against the wall from 1940 to 1943.

If you only wanted to read one about the siege, I would recommend the Wragg book The Bradford book got four stars from me rather than five because of the following:
• The author could have been less redundant.
• The book could have had a better editor.
• In the Kindle edition, maps and photos would have been helpful.

Bradford does tell the stirring story of Malta’s defiance in the face of overwhelming odds comprehensively with some élan and with a definite respect for the Maltese and the British forces that fought on the ground, in the air, and on and under the waves. The Wragg book, which is just as comprehensive, is better organized, edited well, has a helpful chronology of events at the end, and has better stories about what happened on the island and how the Maltese coped, displaying that same awesome respect as in the Bradford book. In the last chapter of the Wragg book, called What Might Have Been, the author gives cogent arguments about the lack of military and civilian preparation regarding Malta before the start of the war. Those preparations might have made history a lot better for the island fortress and its inhabitants. For all these reasons, I gave the Wragg book five stars.

Ultimately, saving Malta was significant in preventing Hitler’s dream of subjugating all of Europe. The Allies eventually launched their attacks into Sicily and the “soft underbelly” of the Axis powers using Malta as a jumping off location. As David Wragg concludes in his excellent book:

“Without Malta, the Second World War would have taken much longer, certainly in Europe…Without the disruption of the Axis supply lines to North Africa inflicted by forces based in Malta, the Axis armies would almost certainly have had all of the material necessary to sweep eastwards to the Suez Canal. Without the defeat suffered by the Axis forces in North Africa…with their supplies hindered by Malta-based forces, the invasion of Sicily would have been immeasurably more difficult, and possibly the landings on mainland Italy and then in the South of France might not have taken place…meaning that everything would have depended on the Normandy landings. Without German preoccupation with the situation in Italy, and the loss of so much in North Africa, resistance in Normandy could have been much stronger…The consequences of defending Malta were grim indeed, and costly, but the consequences of not defending Malta would have been far worse.”

On April 15, 1942, at the height of the siege, the Maltese people received the George Cross, the highest honor Britain can bestow on civilians, from King George VI in recognition of their extraordinary courage. Because of the war, the delivery of the cross to Malta and her people didn’t occur until September 13. Here is the citation that accompanied the award that says it all about the Maltese who fought totalitarianism and prevailed:

“To honour her brave people, I award the George Cross to the Island Fortress of Malta to bear witness to a heroism and devotion that will long be famous in history.”
WtePSeLNaGAyko
In January and February of 1942, an island fortress in the middle of the Mediterranean called Malta was attacked relentlessly by the Luftwaffe, Hitler’s air armada, and the Regis Aeronautica, Mussolini’s fighters and bombers. A relentless blitz with an average of eight airborne attacks a day, each attack employing over a hundred aircraft, over 150 in the last two weeks of January alone, pummeled the Maltese people and the British forces tasked with defending them on their tiny but strategic island. The story of these intrepid individuals and the Royal Air Force and Royal Navy engaged in the conflict is detailed in two books, one by Ernle Bradford, published in 1986, called Siege: Malta, 1940-1943, and the other by David Wragg, published originally in 2004, called Malta: The Last Great Siege 1940-1943.

The Siege of Malta by Hitler and Mussolini, which lasted over two years from June 11, 1940, to November 20, 1942, was a pivotal victory for the Allies and an overwhelming one, but one gained at a great cost in terms of people killed, wounded, almost starved to death, and sickened from resulting diseases, and the destruction of the island’s infrastructure. To get an idea about the cost in blood and treasure for the enemy, here is an excerpt from the Wragg book:

“On 26 May 1943, for the first time in almost three years, a convoy arrived in Gibraltar from Alexandria without losing a single ship. Italy had surrendered. The Mediterranean was no longer ‘Mare Nostrum’, ‘Our Sea’, to the Italians. The effort to make it so had cost Germany and Italy almost a million dead and wounded, as well as 8,000 aircraft, 1,500 of them shot down over Malta, 6,000 guns, 2,500 tanks and 70,000 motor vehicles, in addition to 2,400,000 tons of shipping. By contrast, the Allies had lost just two percent of the ships sent into the Mediterranean, with 70,000 men dead and wounded.”

Malta was crucial to the British (when they stood alone against the Nazis) and subsequently to the Allies. On a secrecy level, it was critical in the intelligence war against the Axis powers as a listening post in the Allies Ultra network that intercepted enemy communications, and on a war strategy level, it was essential for the defeat of Nazi general Erwin Rommel in North Africa. The British and Maltese fighting teams saved their island fortress and were instrumental in halting Mussolini and Hitler’s race to capture the Suez Canal in North Africa. The canal was a short sea route between Britain and Middle East oil supplies. Rather than sailing around the southern tip of Africa, a route that was a much longer and prone to deadly U-boat attack, the Allies used the canal to ship troops, equipment, fuel, and raw materials around the world to where they were needed.

My wife Catherine and I have been to Malta three times on various cruise vacations, and although we learned a bit about the bravery of the Maltese people during World War II, their valor in that war never came as vividly alive as in these books. Like their ancestors, who defeated the Ottoman Empire in 1565 thus saving Christianity and Europe from the Moslem Turks, the Maltese are gentle and God-loving people who become fierce and clever warriors when they have their backs against the wall. And they certainly had their backs against the wall from 1940 to 1943.

If you only wanted to read one about the siege, I would recommend the Wragg book The Bradford book got four stars from me rather than five because of the following:
• The author could have been less redundant.
• The book could have had a better editor.
• In the Kindle edition, maps and photos would have been helpful.

Bradford does tell the stirring story of Malta’s defiance in the face of overwhelming odds comprehensively with some élan and with a definite respect for the Maltese and the British forces that fought on the ground, in the air, and on and under the waves. The Wragg book, which is just as comprehensive, is better organized, edited well, has a helpful chronology of events at the end, and has better stories about what happened on the island and how the Maltese coped, displaying that same awesome respect as in the Bradford book. In the last chapter of the Wragg book, called What Might Have Been, the author gives cogent arguments about the lack of military and civilian preparation regarding Malta before the start of the war. Those preparations might have made history a lot better for the island fortress and its inhabitants. For all these reasons, I gave the Wragg book five stars.

Ultimately, saving Malta was significant in preventing Hitler’s dream of subjugating all of Europe. The Allies eventually launched their attacks into Sicily and the “soft underbelly” of the Axis powers using Malta as a jumping off location. As David Wragg concludes in his excellent book:

“Without Malta, the Second World War would have taken much longer, certainly in Europe…Without the disruption of the Axis supply lines to North Africa inflicted by forces based in Malta, the Axis armies would almost certainly have had all of the material necessary to sweep eastwards to the Suez Canal. Without the defeat suffered by the Axis forces in North Africa…with their supplies hindered by Malta-based forces, the invasion of Sicily would have been immeasurably more difficult, and possibly the landings on mainland Italy and then in the South of France might not have taken place…meaning that everything would have depended on the Normandy landings. Without German preoccupation with the situation in Italy, and the loss of so much in North Africa, resistance in Normandy could have been much stronger…The consequences of defending Malta were grim indeed, and costly, but the consequences of not defending Malta would have been far worse.”

On April 15, 1942, at the height of the siege, the Maltese people received the George Cross, the highest honor Britain can bestow on civilians, from King George VI in recognition of their extraordinary courage. Because of the war, the delivery of the cross to Malta and her people didn’t occur until September 13. Here is the citation that accompanied the award that says it all about the Maltese who fought totalitarianism and prevailed:

“To honour her brave people, I award the George Cross to the Island Fortress of Malta to bear witness to a heroism and devotion that will long be famous in history.”
Vizil
An very well written and incredible story about Malta's struggle during WWII. I read a lot of military history and this book is one of the best I have read in a long time, and one of the only ones I could find on this subject. And even though we all know the outcome, this is a nail biter because the island came so close to collapse/capture at so many times, yet played a pivotal role in helping the Allies win the war in North Africa, before moving on to Italy.
Vizil
An very well written and incredible story about Malta's struggle during WWII. I read a lot of military history and this book is one of the best I have read in a long time, and one of the only ones I could find on this subject. And even though we all know the outcome, this is a nail biter because the island came so close to collapse/capture at so many times, yet played a pivotal role in helping the Allies win the war in North Africa, before moving on to Italy.
Enditaling
As I was born in 1940 , I will appriciate more the hardship my parents had to endure to raise me in those terrible times.A very big thank you to MR. WRAGG!! S.Sultana from tiny MALTA.
Enditaling
As I was born in 1940 , I will appriciate more the hardship my parents had to endure to raise me in those terrible times.A very big thank you to MR. WRAGG!! S.Sultana from tiny MALTA.
Mightdragon
Very interesting and well written.
Mightdragon
Very interesting and well written.