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US Guided Missiles: The Definitive Reference Guide epub download

by Bill Yenne


In US Guided Missiles, author Bill Yenne first takes the reader through a brief yet informative history regarding the development of guided missiles, beginning in World War II and culminating with more recent developments

In US Guided Missiles, author Bill Yenne first takes the reader through a brief yet informative history regarding the development of guided missiles, beginning in World War II and culminating with more recent developments. He expends a good deal of energy explaining the evolution of the designation sj^stem and provides a handy chart for deciphering the current naming convention (p. 15). Offering additional context to the study, Yenne educates readers about the interaction and rivalry that pervaded the Army, Navjr, and Air Force during the development of these weapons.

This book is designed to fill a gap in the literature of military hardware. Thus begins the introduction to Bill Yenne’s latest book. That gap in the literature being referred to is, of course, the topic of guided missiles of the United States military. While one can-and probably should-quibble whether or not this book is indeed the definitive reference guide for US guided missiles, what is readily apparent is that is certainly an excellent guide to a much neglected area in the literature of military hardware. Yenne does fill a gap and does an excellent job of covering the familiar, but particularly many of the newer systems.

AMERICAN MISSILES: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide Anyway, I'm still happy that Bill Yenne wrote this book and had it published.

AMERICAN MISSILES: The Complete Smithsonian Field Guide. Hoping to get this in the mail soon. Anyway, I'm still happy that Bill Yenne wrote this book and had it published. It's an excellent reference work on a subject, which has been largely ignored in the "popular" aviation/military literature. CLEARANCE: Top Secret.

Us Guided Missiles book.

Mr. Yenne's Bibliography was disappointingly brief, with only 29 text . But the "Definitive Reference " I was hoping for is still to be written. 19 people found this helpful.

With three exceptions ( in a separate "Selected Classic Guided Missiles" chapter),the earliest US Missiles ( those that did not recieve an "M" designation in 1963) -are only mentioned by name in three appendices or mentioned in passing in chapter On. Mr. Yenne's Bibliography was disappointingly brief, with only 29 text entries, 12 of them authored by Yenne, and mentions a number of Industry periodicals without giving specifics as to why they were included But the "Definitive Reference " I was hoping for is still to be written.

US Guided Missiles: The Definitive Reference Guide by Bill Yenne

US Guided Missiles: The Definitive Reference Guide by Bill Yenne. Crecy Publishing, 2012, 160 pp. In US Guided Missiles, author Bill Yenne first takes the reader through a brief yet informative history regarding the development of guided missiles, beginning in World War II and culminating with more recent developments. He expends a good deal of energy explaining the evolution of the designation system and provides a handy chart for deciphering the current naming convention (p. Offering additional context to the study, Yenne educates readers about the interaction and rivalry that pervaded.

The US Nuclear Arsenal: A History of Weapons and Delivery Systems Since 1945. US Guided Missiles: The Definitive Reference Guide - Bill Yenne Hardback.

In US Guided Missiles, author Bill Yenne first takes the reader through a brief yet informative history regarding the development of guided missiles, beginning in World . US Guided Missiles: The Definitive Reference Guide.

In US Guided Missiles, author Bill Yenne first takes the reader through a brief yet informative history regarding the development of guided missiles, beginning in World War II and culminating with more recent developments. BAGHDAD, Nina, The Ministry of Defense announced on Wednesday the killing of four terrorists and burning a car bomb carrying a machine gun and destroying a base to launch guided missiles and addressing (20) explosive devices in Al-Anbar.

Let us make life easy on us. Let us be loved ones and lovers. Dive in and discover why this Nutshell guide is considered the definitive reference. ANTLR v4 really makes parsing easy, and this book makes it even easier. The earth shall be left to no one. ― Yunus Emre. The Definitive ANTLR 4 Reference. It explains xi. Part I The Definitiv. 496 Pages·2008·5 MB·671 Downloads·New!. for JSON, the ANTLR tool generates a program that recognizes JSON input using some That's not entirel.

The book also covers the full spectrum of Berkeley DB XML tools, including the command-line shell, transactions, rollbacks .

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Until now, there has never been a comprehensive number-by-number encyclopedic directory of every single U.S. guided missile system ever built. This book covers the exotic winged cruise missiles of the Cold War, the air-to-air and air-to-ground weapons used in Vietnam and Desert Storm, Navy air-defense interceptor missiles, all the ICBMs, plus secret projects and little known types that will intrigue any military history buff. Missiles include the MGM-1 through the MQM-175.

Illustrated with excellent archival and contemporary photography, this book features every single U.S. guided missile, with special coverage of the famous jet-powered winged missiles of the 1950s Cold War. Some entries are presented one-to-a-page while other more well known missiles like the famed Nike series and Atlas ICBMs are covered over several pages with ample photo spreads. This book will serve as the premier reference for anyone interested in any era of U.S. guided missile technology.

US Guided Missiles: The Definitive Reference Guide epub download

ISBN13: 978-0859791625

ISBN: 0859791629

Author: Bill Yenne

Category: History

Subcategory: Military

Language: English

Publisher: Crecy Publishing (December 14, 2012)

Pages: 160 pages

ePUB size: 1497 kb

FB2 size: 1356 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 440

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Kieel
Several years ago, I tried to do what Yenne has attempted, to gather up information on missiles and cross-references of designation systems from various disparate sources but eventually gave up in frustration when I found that Blaugher and Parsch had already done it. So, as a former Missileer, I was quite excited when "U.S. Guided Missiles" was announced last March (2012) as a pre-order. That it took nine months from announcement to delivery (in mid-December), and included one cancellation (by Amazon) of my order along the way is an indication of the literature swamp that Mr. Yenne found himself swimming through in to deliver a readable product on time and within a reasonable cost.

Missiles are funny things. Most have a shelf life of years but a service /flight life measured in minutes or seconds. By and large ( except for some target or Recon drones) they fly one sortie and that's it. Likewise , their "neither fish nor fowl" status has dogged and obscured how the services have viewed them and designated them. not counting WWII designations , there have been four or so attempts to categorize them, in 1947,1951,1955 and 1963. The alphabet soup of letters ( XSSAM-A-1, RTV-N-7, CIM-10,etc.) and the multiple designations early missiles had during their service life ( ex: ,B-75,XSM-75A, PGM-17A Thor ) just added to the general confusion.

Mr Yenne's text deals primarily with those 174 airframes and devices that have had the "M for Missile" designation applied to them in the 1963 revision, and only references the birds of the 1947, 1951 and 1955 designations (that didn't make the 1963 cut) in separate Appendices and Addenda. While this gives a definite structure to the text , it also imposes a limitation that removes any claim to a "definitive reference guide" as the title suggests. Several (20 - 30) of the Missiles reviewed are not provided with any picture, all have only brief specifications , while even the most thorough type review ( the B-65/SM-65/CGM-16/HGM-16 Atlas) only get six pages which includes 10 pictures (including 3 full page pictures) . With three exceptions ( in a separate "Selected Classic Guided Missiles" chapter) ,the earliest US Missiles ( those that did not recieve an "M" designation in 1963) -are only mentioned by name in three appendices or mentioned in passing in chapter One. If you are looking for a more in-depth history of the Atlas, Thor, Nike, Viking, Navajo, Titan, U.S. V-2 trials, or others you would be better served by finding the fine individual published monographs or histories elsewhere ( but since they are not listed in the bibliography , you are on your own to find them).

Being familiar with the Titan II (B-68B/SM-68B/LGM-25C) system I checked the entry for Missile designation 25. I was disappointed to see that the short-lived Titan I (B-68A/SM-68A/HGM-25A) got short shrift (4 paragraphs) , the much longer-lived Titan II even less (two paragraphs) ,that all photos were of the Titan II, and that he mentioned SAC having "56 LGM-25As and 59 CGM-25Cs" ! No and No! He even got the peak number of Titan IIs on Alert wrong ( he claims "63 in 1967" , which is tough to do with only 54 operational sites and one test Site, each with one silo and one bird. While it sounds like nit-picking , finding these clangers makes me wonder what else he got wrong in systems that I didn't know that much about. In another chapter ,on the XSSM-A-1/B-61/TM-61/MGM-1 Matador) the three photos show three totally different versions (Wing placement & tail design), calls two of them YQB-61, and offers no explanation of the changes made or why.

Mr. Yenne's Bibliography was disappointingly brief, with only 29 text entries, 12 of them authored by Yenne, and mentions a number of Industry periodicals without giving specifics as to why they were included . He does provide a list of 26 websites, (including Parsh's very inclusive designation guide) but since print volumes have a much longer working life than websites ,I wonder how long those sites will be up and/or accessible.

That having been said, this text is the best attempt of several in recent memory to put one's arms around the subject of U.S. Missiles, guided and otherwise. It's not definitive, has a lot of gaps, and some incorrect information; but the list and review of the more recent M-designated missiles is the best that I have yet found. I would regard this text as printed as more of a work in progress than a definitive reference. Still, at $34.95 , it is relatively good value for money, and better than any earlier attempts. But the "Definitive Reference " I was hoping for is still to be written
Kieel
Several years ago, I tried to do what Yenne has attempted, to gather up information on missiles and cross-references of designation systems from various disparate sources but eventually gave up in frustration when I found that Blaugher and Parsch had already done it. So, as a former Missileer, I was quite excited when "U.S. Guided Missiles" was announced last March (2012) as a pre-order. That it took nine months from announcement to delivery (in mid-December), and included one cancellation (by Amazon) of my order along the way is an indication of the literature swamp that Mr. Yenne found himself swimming through in to deliver a readable product on time and within a reasonable cost.

Missiles are funny things. Most have a shelf life of years but a service /flight life measured in minutes or seconds. By and large ( except for some target or Recon drones) they fly one sortie and that's it. Likewise , their "neither fish nor fowl" status has dogged and obscured how the services have viewed them and designated them. not counting WWII designations , there have been four or so attempts to categorize them, in 1947,1951,1955 and 1963. The alphabet soup of letters ( XSSAM-A-1, RTV-N-7, CIM-10,etc.) and the multiple designations early missiles had during their service life ( ex: ,B-75,XSM-75A, PGM-17A Thor ) just added to the general confusion.

Mr Yenne's text deals primarily with those 174 airframes and devices that have had the "M for Missile" designation applied to them in the 1963 revision, and only references the birds of the 1947, 1951 and 1955 designations (that didn't make the 1963 cut) in separate Appendices and Addenda. While this gives a definite structure to the text , it also imposes a limitation that removes any claim to a "definitive reference guide" as the title suggests. Several (20 - 30) of the Missiles reviewed are not provided with any picture, all have only brief specifications , while even the most thorough type review ( the B-65/SM-65/CGM-16/HGM-16 Atlas) only get six pages which includes 10 pictures (including 3 full page pictures) . With three exceptions ( in a separate "Selected Classic Guided Missiles" chapter) ,the earliest US Missiles ( those that did not recieve an "M" designation in 1963) -are only mentioned by name in three appendices or mentioned in passing in chapter One. If you are looking for a more in-depth history of the Atlas, Thor, Nike, Viking, Navajo, Titan, U.S. V-2 trials, or others you would be better served by finding the fine individual published monographs or histories elsewhere ( but since they are not listed in the bibliography , you are on your own to find them).

Being familiar with the Titan II (B-68B/SM-68B/LGM-25C) system I checked the entry for Missile designation 25. I was disappointed to see that the short-lived Titan I (B-68A/SM-68A/HGM-25A) got short shrift (4 paragraphs) , the much longer-lived Titan II even less (two paragraphs) ,that all photos were of the Titan II, and that he mentioned SAC having "56 LGM-25As and 59 CGM-25Cs" ! No and No! He even got the peak number of Titan IIs on Alert wrong ( he claims "63 in 1967" , which is tough to do with only 54 operational sites and one test Site, each with one silo and one bird. While it sounds like nit-picking , finding these clangers makes me wonder what else he got wrong in systems that I didn't know that much about. In another chapter ,on the XSSM-A-1/B-61/TM-61/MGM-1 Matador) the three photos show three totally different versions (Wing placement & tail design), calls two of them YQB-61, and offers no explanation of the changes made or why.

Mr. Yenne's Bibliography was disappointingly brief, with only 29 text entries, 12 of them authored by Yenne, and mentions a number of Industry periodicals without giving specifics as to why they were included . He does provide a list of 26 websites, (including Parsh's very inclusive designation guide) but since print volumes have a much longer working life than websites ,I wonder how long those sites will be up and/or accessible.

That having been said, this text is the best attempt of several in recent memory to put one's arms around the subject of U.S. Missiles, guided and otherwise. It's not definitive, has a lot of gaps, and some incorrect information; but the list and review of the more recent M-designated missiles is the best that I have yet found. I would regard this text as printed as more of a work in progress than a definitive reference. Still, at $34.95 , it is relatively good value for money, and better than any earlier attempts. But the "Definitive Reference " I was hoping for is still to be written
Rolling Flipper
Once again, noted aerospace historian and author Bill Yenne has filled a much-needed niche and crafted a volume that has something for everyone. Typical of his previous offerings, the contents are presented with technical details sufficient to satisfy any engineer but with the readability and graphic appeal that an "armchair enthusiast" will find inviting.

The generous 256-page format allowed for a level of thoroughness not often found in books covering this important subject but one that I've come to expect from Mr. Yenne. Following a brief but very informative introduction that brings the reader up to speed, over 200 pages are devoted to a number-by-number review of all 175 missiles that have been included in the "M" designation series. For each missile, you'll find a concise overview of development and deployment, a data block with technical specifications, and superb representative photographs. Compiling a volume of this complexity was clearly no easy task.

And this brings up another important aspect of the book. Having grown up during the Cold War, my childhood favorite missiles had designations that seemed to reflect a good many diverse numbering systems. The U.S. Navy's Regulus II carried the designation SSM-N-9 while missiles belonging to the U.S. Air Force appeared to be "inserted" into the existing bomber or even fighter series. Being designed to intercept formations of enemy aircraft, the Bomarc was initially referred to as the F-99 (Fighter), but soon this was changed to a more appropriate IM-99 (Interceptor Missile). Several other Air Force missiles were originally categorized as "bombers" but then had their designations similarly changed, hence the B-61 Matador, B-62 Snark, and B-63 Rascal eventually being referred to as TM-61, SM-62, and GAM-63, respectively. Like many readers, I would have assumed that all of the above mentioned numbers were a part of the sequential system that is the focus of this book, but such is not the case!

Most missiles were apparently entered into the new "universal" system in a relatively chronological order. Thus, some of those favorites of mine eventually became the MGM-1 Matador, CIM-10 Bomarc, and RGM-15 Regulus II. Along the way, many other missiles were added and there were a few surprises. Who could have guessed that a single vehicle would be given the very same number in two entirely different military systems? When retirement time came for Convair's famous F-102 Delta Dagger and it was selected for conversion to an unmanned target drone, it became the PQM-102!

The author goes to great lengths to sort everything out and further explains the meaning behind all of the seemingly confusing prefix letters so the reader will learn the difference between a missile that's designated "MGM", "CIM", "RGM", etc. The addendum section of the book includes supplemental information covering important missiles that, for one reason or another, did not receive "M" series numbers. Included here are the legendary Snark, Rascal, and Navaho, as well as three anti-missile programs that are of historical significance. Also covered are the 18 members of the parallel "rocket" family, appropriately given "R" designations.

"U.S. Guided Missiles" finishes off with several appendices that shed light on early designation systems and this gives the reader a comprehensive "big picture" view of a truly fascinating story. This outstanding book is an essential and highly recommended addition to the library of any military aviation buff!
Rolling Flipper
Once again, noted aerospace historian and author Bill Yenne has filled a much-needed niche and crafted a volume that has something for everyone. Typical of his previous offerings, the contents are presented with technical details sufficient to satisfy any engineer but with the readability and graphic appeal that an "armchair enthusiast" will find inviting.

The generous 256-page format allowed for a level of thoroughness not often found in books covering this important subject but one that I've come to expect from Mr. Yenne. Following a brief but very informative introduction that brings the reader up to speed, over 200 pages are devoted to a number-by-number review of all 175 missiles that have been included in the "M" designation series. For each missile, you'll find a concise overview of development and deployment, a data block with technical specifications, and superb representative photographs. Compiling a volume of this complexity was clearly no easy task.

And this brings up another important aspect of the book. Having grown up during the Cold War, my childhood favorite missiles had designations that seemed to reflect a good many diverse numbering systems. The U.S. Navy's Regulus II carried the designation SSM-N-9 while missiles belonging to the U.S. Air Force appeared to be "inserted" into the existing bomber or even fighter series. Being designed to intercept formations of enemy aircraft, the Bomarc was initially referred to as the F-99 (Fighter), but soon this was changed to a more appropriate IM-99 (Interceptor Missile). Several other Air Force missiles were originally categorized as "bombers" but then had their designations similarly changed, hence the B-61 Matador, B-62 Snark, and B-63 Rascal eventually being referred to as TM-61, SM-62, and GAM-63, respectively. Like many readers, I would have assumed that all of the above mentioned numbers were a part of the sequential system that is the focus of this book, but such is not the case!

Most missiles were apparently entered into the new "universal" system in a relatively chronological order. Thus, some of those favorites of mine eventually became the MGM-1 Matador, CIM-10 Bomarc, and RGM-15 Regulus II. Along the way, many other missiles were added and there were a few surprises. Who could have guessed that a single vehicle would be given the very same number in two entirely different military systems? When retirement time came for Convair's famous F-102 Delta Dagger and it was selected for conversion to an unmanned target drone, it became the PQM-102!

The author goes to great lengths to sort everything out and further explains the meaning behind all of the seemingly confusing prefix letters so the reader will learn the difference between a missile that's designated "MGM", "CIM", "RGM", etc. The addendum section of the book includes supplemental information covering important missiles that, for one reason or another, did not receive "M" series numbers. Included here are the legendary Snark, Rascal, and Navaho, as well as three anti-missile programs that are of historical significance. Also covered are the 18 members of the parallel "rocket" family, appropriately given "R" designations.

"U.S. Guided Missiles" finishes off with several appendices that shed light on early designation systems and this gives the reader a comprehensive "big picture" view of a truly fascinating story. This outstanding book is an essential and highly recommended addition to the library of any military aviation buff!
Beabandis
This book is full of errors, an example would be the statement that a 'MIM3 Nike Ajax battery was comprised of an Integrated Fire Control (IFC) Section and three missile BATTERIES', when in fact a Nike Ajax battery was comprised of the IFC and three to six FIRE SECTIONS. Many missile systems are completely missing. And others are lumped together,when they were in fact separate systems an example here would be the Nike Zeus/Spartan missiles. The program was comprised of 4 separate missiles: the Nike Zeus A, the Nike Zeus B, the MIM49 Spartan A and the MIM49A Spartan B. And the early designation (pre-1963) used for say the Nike Hercules was the SAM-A-14 not the M6 as it is referenced in this book. The photos used are largely retreads of pictures that have been published over and over. And rather than laying out the book by weapons function, ie, ground based SAMs, sea based SAMs Tactical SSM's, Strategic SSM's, etc., it is arranged by some quasi-chronological/designation numbering system that seems to make no sense. Little mention is made of command and control systems, or development background. In my opinion as a military historian Bill Gunston's Rockets and Missiles remains the 'Definitive Book' on the subject, with James Gibson' Nuclear Weapons of the United States' and Chuck Hansen's 'US nuclear Weapons' being the top technical references on the nuclear capable systems. The redeeming factor her is the inclusion of the more recent systems. I got out of the weapons development field in the late 1980's before many of the newer systems came online. But when given the inaccurate data provided for the systems I did work with (Nike Ajax, HAWK, Nike Hercules, Spartan, Sprint, ASROC, Harpoon, and Tomahawk) I tend to suspect the data on the newer systems as well.
Beabandis
This book is full of errors, an example would be the statement that a 'MIM3 Nike Ajax battery was comprised of an Integrated Fire Control (IFC) Section and three missile BATTERIES', when in fact a Nike Ajax battery was comprised of the IFC and three to six FIRE SECTIONS. Many missile systems are completely missing. And others are lumped together,when they were in fact separate systems an example here would be the Nike Zeus/Spartan missiles. The program was comprised of 4 separate missiles: the Nike Zeus A, the Nike Zeus B, the MIM49 Spartan A and the MIM49A Spartan B. And the early designation (pre-1963) used for say the Nike Hercules was the SAM-A-14 not the M6 as it is referenced in this book. The photos used are largely retreads of pictures that have been published over and over. And rather than laying out the book by weapons function, ie, ground based SAMs, sea based SAMs Tactical SSM's, Strategic SSM's, etc., it is arranged by some quasi-chronological/designation numbering system that seems to make no sense. Little mention is made of command and control systems, or development background. In my opinion as a military historian Bill Gunston's Rockets and Missiles remains the 'Definitive Book' on the subject, with James Gibson' Nuclear Weapons of the United States' and Chuck Hansen's 'US nuclear Weapons' being the top technical references on the nuclear capable systems. The redeeming factor her is the inclusion of the more recent systems. I got out of the weapons development field in the late 1980's before many of the newer systems came online. But when given the inaccurate data provided for the systems I did work with (Nike Ajax, HAWK, Nike Hercules, Spartan, Sprint, ASROC, Harpoon, and Tomahawk) I tend to suspect the data on the newer systems as well.