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Inferno: The Epic Life and Death Struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II epub download

by Joseph A. Springer


NAVAL HISTORY Joseph Springer brings to life one of the most exciting stories of World War II as seen and told from the perspective of officers and Sailors who served on board the Essex-class aircraft carrier USS Franklin.

NAVAL HISTORY Joseph Springer brings to life one of the most exciting stories of World War II as seen and told from the perspective of officers and Sailors who served on board the Essex-class aircraft carrier USS Franklin.

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The gallant story of the American aircraft carrier USS FRANKLIN. It is with sadness I must report that Marine Steve Nowak (pron "Novak"), a gunner aboard USS Franklin, and the recipient of the Navy Cross for actions on March 19, 1945, passed away on Feb 06, 2017. Steve felt he should have been awarded the Medal of Honor for saving the lives of more than 300 fellow crewmen who were trapped in the Officer's Mess. Indeed, this bothered him for the rest of his life. I am so grateful and blessed to have known Steve. He did not suffer fools gladly and called a spade a spade. There were no gray areas for Steve. I will miss his humor most of all.

The book begins with the shakedown cruise, where the crew becomes familiar with their new charge and her operations. The story then moves on to her first combat and continues on through the significant combat operations that "Big Ben" was a part of in the central and western Pacific.

Автор: Springer Joseph A. Название: Inferno: The Epic Life and . Inferno tells the heroic tale of the efforts that saved Big Ben. It is a tremendous story of endurance and seamanship told in harrowing detail in the survivors own words. Inferno makes for gripping reading.

Inferno tells the heroic tale of the efforts that saved Big Ben.

Known throughout the fleet as "Big Ben," the USS Franklin was christened for the legacy of the four prior . Navy ships named after Benjamin Franklin. The Franklin was a creation of World War II, one of twenty-four Essex-class fast carriers built during the conflict, forming the backbone of the . Navy's war against Japan.

The USS Franklin was the most heavily damaged carrier in World War II to survive an attack. Springer, Joseph A. Inferno: The Epic Life and Death Struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Zenith Books, 2007. List of World War II documentary films.

Very interesting read abt the USS Franklin, a most historic naval ship. This is especially interesting to any family members that want to learn of the relatives that may have served on the ship. The USS Franklin was attacked by kamikaze near Okinawa,Japan on March 19,1945. The ship made it back to NYC Harbor under its own steam and considering the damage the ship had suffered,this is a miracle in itself. LauGal, August 16, 2016.

Inferno is oral history at its best. Joseph Springer interviewed more than 150 veterans of the ship and studied thousands of pages of crew reports. From this he has written a compelling, seamless narrative of catastrophe, recovery, and bitterness

Inferno is oral history at its best. From this he has written a compelling, seamless narrative of catastrophe, recovery, and bitterness. The crew of the Franklin emerges as an inspiration for all later generations. Its captain appears in a very different light. Stringer covers the Franklin's construction and shakedown, as well as its wartime record and the kamikaze strike in October 1944. Like any Essex-class carrier, Franklin led an exciting life

Known throughout the fleet as Big Ben,­ the USS was christened for the legacy of the four prior . S. The was one of twenty-­four Essex-­class fast carriers built during World War II, forming the backbone of the . Navy’s war against Japan.

Known throughout the fleet as Big Ben,­ the USS was christened for the legacy of the four prior . On March 19, 1945, during a planned aircraft launch against Honshu, the Japanese mainland, the Franklin was struck with a 250kg bomb from an enemy aircraft, setting off a chain reaction of exploding ordnance and aviation fuel.

March 19, 1945 – Off the coast of Japan, the USS Franklin had just launched its aircraft in an attack of the shipping industry in Kobe Harbor when a single enemy aircraft pierced the cloud cover and made a low level run on the ship known as “Big Ben.” In a matter of seconds, the aircraft’s 250kg bomb would strike the Franklin, piercing the deck and setting off a chain reaction of exploding ordnance and aviation fuel. Afire, listing heavily to starboard, and with over 1,000 killed or wounded, it appeared as if the USS Franklin would find her end among the waters of the Pacific. The events that followed, however, would make the story of Big Ben one of the most dramatic and inspiring in naval history.   Now available in paperback from historian Joseph Springer, Inferno: The Epic Life and Death Struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II tells the heroic tale of the near-miraculous efforts that went into saving the USS Franklin—from the selfless contributions of the hundreds of officers and enlisted men who voluntarily remained onboard to the assistance of the USS Santa Fe in rescuing crewmen from the sea, fighting the fires, and closing in alongside the Franklin to take off the numerous wounded and nonessential personnel. Told in the survivors’ words, the story of the legendary ship’s arduous journey from Okinawa to the Brooklyn Navy Yard unfolds in harrowing detail. It is a tremendous tale of endurance and seamanship, and unlike any in the proud history of the U.S. Navy.  

Inferno: The Epic Life and Death Struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II epub download

ISBN13: 978-0760339763

ISBN: 0760339767

Author: Joseph A. Springer

Category: History

Subcategory: Military

Language: English

Publisher: Zenith Press; First edition (September 12, 2011)

Pages: 352 pages

ePUB size: 1489 kb

FB2 size: 1655 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 712

Other Formats: rtf lrf doc txt

Related to Inferno: The Epic Life and Death Struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II ePub books

Xinetan
Two of my shipmates were ship's company on the USS Forrestal CVA-59 and went through that trial at sea. I served in USS Enterprise CVAN-65 and left the ship before the Big E survived a big fire at sea. Someone who has never lived aboard one of these floating cities with an airport on the roof can't fully appreciate how damn dangerous they can be. The crew of the Franklin were damn fine sailors & marines _ every man jack of them. The disgusting actions of the Franklin's captain left me with a bad taste. He was a disgrace to the US Navy and I'm appalled the senior admirals didn't censure him. Hand salute to Admiral Forrestal for nixing him getting an MOH. The photo is the Big E off of Hawaii January 14, 1969.
Xinetan
Two of my shipmates were ship's company on the USS Forrestal CVA-59 and went through that trial at sea. I served in USS Enterprise CVAN-65 and left the ship before the Big E survived a big fire at sea. Someone who has never lived aboard one of these floating cities with an airport on the roof can't fully appreciate how damn dangerous they can be. The crew of the Franklin were damn fine sailors & marines _ every man jack of them. The disgusting actions of the Franklin's captain left me with a bad taste. He was a disgrace to the US Navy and I'm appalled the senior admirals didn't censure him. Hand salute to Admiral Forrestal for nixing him getting an MOH. The photo is the Big E off of Hawaii January 14, 1969.
Wire
In this exciting book, author Joseph A. Springer tells the tale of the USS Franklin and her fight to survive against the Japanese.

"Big Ben" was one of over twenty Essex-class aircraft carriers built during World War II. Measuring over 800 feet long and carrying 90+ aircraft, Big Ben and her sister ships had brought the war right to Japan's doorstep by the early spring of 1945. The Franklin had served in numerous campaigns since her commissioning, earning a remarkable battle record along the way.

In March, 1945, the Franklin and the rest of the Big Blue Fleet were poised less than 60 miles from Japan. Franklin's planes were assigned to bomb airfields suspected of housing kamikaze aircraft. The Franklin had a run-in with a kamikaze the previous fall which resulted in the loss of many men and necessitated her return to the mainland for repairs. While undergoing refit, the Franklin received a new captain, Leslie Edward Gehres. He was a by-the-book captain who regularly belittled his crew. The crew members took an immediate dislike to Gehres, and this only grew worse as time went on.

On March 19, 1945, a single Japanese Judy dive bomber weaved through the intense flak put up by the Americans and dropped a single bomb square on the deck of the Franklin. During the next twenty-eight hours, the Franklin fought for her life as huge explosions racked the ship. Hundreds of men were killed and many were blown off the ship due to the raging fires. There were numerous acts of heroism and gallantry as the crew fought to save the ship. The light cruiser USS Santa Fe moved alongside the Franklin to assist with the firefighting as well as evacuating the wounded.

Finally, the ship's fires were brought under control and a tow line was rigged between the Franklin and the heavy cruiser USS Pittsburgh. The Franklin was towed out of harm's way until she could steam on her own. In the end, the Franklin was able to steam all the way back to New York for repairs. But, 798 men were killed and 487 wounded in this terrible attack. Captain Gehres threatened to court-martial the men who had left the ship, including the ones who were blown over the side. He made up little cards and distributed them to the men who had remained on the ship. He also refused to let the survivors who left the ship sail back to the United States aboard the Franklin.

This is an excellent book. What makes the book so good is the oral histories provided by the surviving crew members. These brave men give the reader a vivid picture of what it was like to serve on the Franklin. They also pulled no punches in describing their dislike of captain Gehres. The best part was the survivors' description of the dive bombing attack and how they banded together to save the ship.

I give this book my highest recommendation. Oral histories are the best way to really learn about an event, and Joseph Springer has used the oral histories contained in this book to paint a picture of what it was really like to serve on a fleet carrier in World War II. The interwoven text provided by Springer is informative as well. World War II history fans will definitely enjoy this fine book.
Wire
In this exciting book, author Joseph A. Springer tells the tale of the USS Franklin and her fight to survive against the Japanese.

"Big Ben" was one of over twenty Essex-class aircraft carriers built during World War II. Measuring over 800 feet long and carrying 90+ aircraft, Big Ben and her sister ships had brought the war right to Japan's doorstep by the early spring of 1945. The Franklin had served in numerous campaigns since her commissioning, earning a remarkable battle record along the way.

In March, 1945, the Franklin and the rest of the Big Blue Fleet were poised less than 60 miles from Japan. Franklin's planes were assigned to bomb airfields suspected of housing kamikaze aircraft. The Franklin had a run-in with a kamikaze the previous fall which resulted in the loss of many men and necessitated her return to the mainland for repairs. While undergoing refit, the Franklin received a new captain, Leslie Edward Gehres. He was a by-the-book captain who regularly belittled his crew. The crew members took an immediate dislike to Gehres, and this only grew worse as time went on.

On March 19, 1945, a single Japanese Judy dive bomber weaved through the intense flak put up by the Americans and dropped a single bomb square on the deck of the Franklin. During the next twenty-eight hours, the Franklin fought for her life as huge explosions racked the ship. Hundreds of men were killed and many were blown off the ship due to the raging fires. There were numerous acts of heroism and gallantry as the crew fought to save the ship. The light cruiser USS Santa Fe moved alongside the Franklin to assist with the firefighting as well as evacuating the wounded.

Finally, the ship's fires were brought under control and a tow line was rigged between the Franklin and the heavy cruiser USS Pittsburgh. The Franklin was towed out of harm's way until she could steam on her own. In the end, the Franklin was able to steam all the way back to New York for repairs. But, 798 men were killed and 487 wounded in this terrible attack. Captain Gehres threatened to court-martial the men who had left the ship, including the ones who were blown over the side. He made up little cards and distributed them to the men who had remained on the ship. He also refused to let the survivors who left the ship sail back to the United States aboard the Franklin.

This is an excellent book. What makes the book so good is the oral histories provided by the surviving crew members. These brave men give the reader a vivid picture of what it was like to serve on the Franklin. They also pulled no punches in describing their dislike of captain Gehres. The best part was the survivors' description of the dive bombing attack and how they banded together to save the ship.

I give this book my highest recommendation. Oral histories are the best way to really learn about an event, and Joseph Springer has used the oral histories contained in this book to paint a picture of what it was really like to serve on a fleet carrier in World War II. The interwoven text provided by Springer is informative as well. World War II history fans will definitely enjoy this fine book.
Tegore
This book was very close to home for me and my family. My Mother's 2nd oldest brother was on the USS Franklin for the duration of the war. He was a Fireman, and also worked in the boiler room, that's where he was when this happened to the Franklin. I could think of his experience through the whole book. My Uncle was on the ship when it sailed into NY harbor and he came home to upstate NY. The metal pieces in his head left him with terrible headaches, and the pictures in his mind of men jumping overboard with their helmets strapped under their chins only to have their necks broken when they hit the water. How many he saved by taking the strap or the helmet off, but the many he couldn't save, gave him nightmares for many years after. The one thing my Uncle never did, was to talk about this Inferno.
Tegore
This book was very close to home for me and my family. My Mother's 2nd oldest brother was on the USS Franklin for the duration of the war. He was a Fireman, and also worked in the boiler room, that's where he was when this happened to the Franklin. I could think of his experience through the whole book. My Uncle was on the ship when it sailed into NY harbor and he came home to upstate NY. The metal pieces in his head left him with terrible headaches, and the pictures in his mind of men jumping overboard with their helmets strapped under their chins only to have their necks broken when they hit the water. How many he saved by taking the strap or the helmet off, but the many he couldn't save, gave him nightmares for many years after. The one thing my Uncle never did, was to talk about this Inferno.
Runemane
Finally after all these years an author tells the whole story as nearlly as it can be told, ( too many of the knowledgeable crew are now deceased). The book (hardcover edition) is well illustrated, complete with diagrams of the ship and the bomb stikes. It is important that the reader grasp the enormous explosive nature of fully armed and fueled aircraft both on the flight deck and especiallly the hangar deck. It is not the power of a single 500kg bomb or a second 250kg bomb that can destroy a ship of this size, it is the fire and sustained explosions from all of those armed and fueled planes that nearly blew the USS Ben Franklin out of the water on March 19, 1945. The heroic efforts of the crew of the USS Ben Franklin and the crew of the USS Santa Fe for fighting the fires until they were under control are the primary reason that Franklin survived the day.
My father was the ordinance officer for VMF-214 & VMF-452. This book will go down as the definitive edition on the subject.
Runemane
Finally after all these years an author tells the whole story as nearlly as it can be told, ( too many of the knowledgeable crew are now deceased). The book (hardcover edition) is well illustrated, complete with diagrams of the ship and the bomb stikes. It is important that the reader grasp the enormous explosive nature of fully armed and fueled aircraft both on the flight deck and especiallly the hangar deck. It is not the power of a single 500kg bomb or a second 250kg bomb that can destroy a ship of this size, it is the fire and sustained explosions from all of those armed and fueled planes that nearly blew the USS Ben Franklin out of the water on March 19, 1945. The heroic efforts of the crew of the USS Ben Franklin and the crew of the USS Santa Fe for fighting the fires until they were under control are the primary reason that Franklin survived the day.
My father was the ordinance officer for VMF-214 & VMF-452. This book will go down as the definitive edition on the subject.
Sennnel
Very interesting story about a valiant ship and crew. It's also the tale of a Captain that should not have be in command of a ship and sailors during WW2. Occasionally, someone reaches high command who simply should not be in charge of people, (example, Marcus A Arnheiter). The Captain of the Franklin was one of those. It is a fine story of saving a ship so badly damaged that in most cases she would have sunk.
Sennnel
Very interesting story about a valiant ship and crew. It's also the tale of a Captain that should not have be in command of a ship and sailors during WW2. Occasionally, someone reaches high command who simply should not be in charge of people, (example, Marcus A Arnheiter). The Captain of the Franklin was one of those. It is a fine story of saving a ship so badly damaged that in most cases she would have sunk.