» » Fletcher-Class Destroyers (Warship Design Histories)

Fletcher-Class Destroyers (Warship Design Histories) epub download

by Alan Raven


The Fletcher class was a class of destroyers built by the United States during World War II. The class was designed in 1939, as a result of dissatisfaction with the earlier destroyer leader types of the Porter and Somers classes.

The Fletcher class was a class of destroyers built by the United States during World War II. Some went on to serve during the Korean War and into the Vietnam War. The United States Navy commissioned 175 Fletcher-class destroyers between 1942 and 1944, more than any other destroyer class, and the design was generally regarded as highly successful

Fletcher-Class Destroyers by Alan Raven. Forty three pages of pictures. The major difference is that Raven’s book is a design history of a large class of ships over four decades, while Ross’s book is about just one ship that served from 1942 to 1965.

Fletcher-Class Destroyers by Alan Raven. Eighty pages of drawings. Ross’s book also acknowledges Raven’s book as a source. Both books have a table of contents, but no index. Raven’s book starts off with thirteen pages of text covering the design, construction, wartime modifications, CIC, Radar Pickets, and onset of the cold war. This is followed by forty one pages of photographs including at least fifteen close ups that would be very helpful to model builders.

Series: Warship Design Histories. Hardcover: 191 pages. Now, for the content. Basic design guidelines with an explanation of war-time pressures start the book, followed by a medium in-depth coverage of the ship's development and wartime service. Some very useful tables showing differences between ships of the class regarding displacement, beam, speed, draft levels, etc. Author explains very clearly which set of official blueprints he used, plus the ones he nor anyone else could get a hold of.

Fletcher-Class Destroyers. Warship Design Histories. Title: Fletcher-Class Destroyers Warship Design Histories. ISBN-10: 0-87021-147-1. We are aware of 9 similar reference publications related to "Destroyer Fletcher-class". Zerstörer der Fletcher-Klasser Die Zerstörer der Klasse 119 der Deutschen Marine.

Fletcher Class Destroyers book. Fletcher Class Destroyers (Warship Design Histories).

Spine is straight with no damage. The Fletcher-Class Destroyers. by Alan Ravan and Alan Raven. Select Format: Hardcover. RAVEN, ALAN (Author) WARSHIP DESIGN HISTORIES (Author) Naval Institute Press (Publisher). V and W class destroyers. Electronic Greyhounds the Spruance-Class destroyers. Vehicles, aircraft and ships. Ship SCale Model, USS Fletcher Class destroyer: American. How has war in the air changed over time? KS3-4.

Raven, Alan, Fletcher-class Destroyers. McComb, Dave, US Destroyers 1934–45, Pre-War Classes

Raven, Alan, Fletcher-class Destroyers. Annapolis, Naval Institute Press, 1986 - photographs and line drawings. McComb, Dave, US Destroyers 1934–45, Pre-War Classes. Oxford, Osprey Publishing, Lt. 2010 - illustrated overview of design and World War II operations of the US destroyer classes designed during the 1930s. McComb, Dave, US Destroyers 1942–45, Wartime Classes. 2010 - illustrated overview of design and World War II operations of the Fletcher, Allen M. Sumner and Gearing classes.

Book by Raven, Alan

Fletcher-Class Destroyers (Warship Design Histories) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0870211935

ISBN: 0870211935

Author: Alan Raven

Category: History

Subcategory: Military

Language: English

Publisher: Naval Institute Press; 1st edition (October 1, 1986)

Pages: 158 pages

ePUB size: 1706 kb

FB2 size: 1211 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 605

Other Formats: lit mbr txt azw

Related to Fletcher-Class Destroyers (Warship Design Histories) ePub books

Vinainl
Fletcher-Class Destroyers by Alan Raven

Forty three pages of pictures. Eighty pages of drawings. Six pages on paint schemes and camouflage. Only thirteen pages of prose. I would have liked more information. I would have thought that such a book would include details about magazine capacity and shell types. I looked for and did not find the number of depth charges carried, although I was able to count them in some of the pictures. Alan Raven is a great writer on the subject of World War Two naval ships, but this was a perfunctory effort. There is almost nothing on details, deployments, survivability, combat, operations, tactics or significant actions. Whether I can recommend this book depends on the price. I bought an inexpensive used copy and consider it good value for what I paid.
Vinainl
Fletcher-Class Destroyers by Alan Raven

Forty three pages of pictures. Eighty pages of drawings. Six pages on paint schemes and camouflage. Only thirteen pages of prose. I would have liked more information. I would have thought that such a book would include details about magazine capacity and shell types. I looked for and did not find the number of depth charges carried, although I was able to count them in some of the pictures. Alan Raven is a great writer on the subject of World War Two naval ships, but this was a perfunctory effort. There is almost nothing on details, deployments, survivability, combat, operations, tactics or significant actions. Whether I can recommend this book depends on the price. I bought an inexpensive used copy and consider it good value for what I paid.
Timberahue
Not a bad book for the price, covers a lot of ground, has clear pictures and lots of nice line drawings. Great for the modeler, especially those scratch-builder types. Lots of info packed into a rather slim little volume.
Timberahue
Not a bad book for the price, covers a lot of ground, has clear pictures and lots of nice line drawings. Great for the modeler, especially those scratch-builder types. Lots of info packed into a rather slim little volume.
Niwield
One of the very best sources of information on Fletcher class destroyers available. If your a model builder this one is a "Must Have" - there are so many pictures and line drawings I couldn't possibly tell about them all. If it isn't covered in this book, you probably don't need it.

Ron (FoMo)
Niwield
One of the very best sources of information on Fletcher class destroyers available. If your a model builder this one is a "Must Have" - there are so many pictures and line drawings I couldn't possibly tell about them all. If it isn't covered in this book, you probably don't need it.

Ron (FoMo)
Ndlaitha
This report is a comparison of two very similar books, both are about similar ships and published by the Naval Institute Press. The first book is “Fletcher-Class Destroyers” by Alan Raven, c. 1986, 158 pages; and “The Destroyer The Sullivans (Anatomy of the Ship)” by Al Ross, c. 1988, 119 pages. Both books follow the format of the popular Anatomy of the Ship Series. Both books have a wonderful collection of photographs and excellent drawings. The major difference is that Raven’s book is a design history of a large class of ships over four decades, while Ross’s book is about just one ship that served from 1942 to 1965. Ross’s book also acknowledges Raven’s book as a source. Both books have a table of contents, but no index.
Raven’s book starts off with thirteen pages of text covering the design, construction, wartime modifications, CIC, Radar Pickets, and onset of the cold war. This is followed by forty one pages of photographs including at least fifteen close ups that would be very helpful to model builders. There is also an interior shot of the Engineering throttle board and a photo of the bridge. This is followed by ninety five pages of drawings. This segment includes an extra 27 photos that are mostly close ups that would be very useful to model builders. The drawing section includes drawings of many variations over the four decades of service. 28 pages are general arrangement plans, 10 pages are general fittings and equipment, 4 pages are propellers, shafting and rudders, 10 pages are of the antennas, 28 pages are weapons and associated equipment, and 10 more pages of camouflage and funnel designs. The last three pages are a list of all of the ships in the class giving the respective hull numbers and dates of laid down and commissioning.

Ross’s book starts off with 12 pages of text, including service history (1 page), general arrangement, Machinery details (4 pages), weapons (5 pages), and camouflage. This is followed by twenty two pages of photographs most of which are mostly close ups that would be very useful to model builders. Finally there are 71 pages of drawings … 18 pages of general arrangements, 2 pages of hull construction, 6 pages of machinery, 2 pages of general arrangement of accommodations, 12 pages showing changes in superstructure from 1943 to 1959, 3 pages of rigging, 21 pages of armament, four pages of exterior fire control equipment, 8 pages of fittings, 2 pages of ground tackle, and 4 pages of ships boats.

In conclusion, both books give a good design history for naval historians and lots of useful photos and drawings for the model builder. Raven’s book has slightly better data for the model builder but Ross’s book would still offer some extra useful information. Ross’s book also has data and drawings of the machinery which are completely lacking from Raven’s book.

Readers who would like even more super details of similar US destroyers will enjoy "Sumner-Gearing-Class Destroyers" by Robert Sumrall, c. 1995, 289 pages.
Ndlaitha
This report is a comparison of two very similar books, both are about similar ships and published by the Naval Institute Press. The first book is “Fletcher-Class Destroyers” by Alan Raven, c. 1986, 158 pages; and “The Destroyer The Sullivans (Anatomy of the Ship)” by Al Ross, c. 1988, 119 pages. Both books follow the format of the popular Anatomy of the Ship Series. Both books have a wonderful collection of photographs and excellent drawings. The major difference is that Raven’s book is a design history of a large class of ships over four decades, while Ross’s book is about just one ship that served from 1942 to 1965. Ross’s book also acknowledges Raven’s book as a source. Both books have a table of contents, but no index.
Raven’s book starts off with thirteen pages of text covering the design, construction, wartime modifications, CIC, Radar Pickets, and onset of the cold war. This is followed by forty one pages of photographs including at least fifteen close ups that would be very helpful to model builders. There is also an interior shot of the Engineering throttle board and a photo of the bridge. This is followed by ninety five pages of drawings. This segment includes an extra 27 photos that are mostly close ups that would be very useful to model builders. The drawing section includes drawings of many variations over the four decades of service. 28 pages are general arrangement plans, 10 pages are general fittings and equipment, 4 pages are propellers, shafting and rudders, 10 pages are of the antennas, 28 pages are weapons and associated equipment, and 10 more pages of camouflage and funnel designs. The last three pages are a list of all of the ships in the class giving the respective hull numbers and dates of laid down and commissioning.

Ross’s book starts off with 12 pages of text, including service history (1 page), general arrangement, Machinery details (4 pages), weapons (5 pages), and camouflage. This is followed by twenty two pages of photographs most of which are mostly close ups that would be very useful to model builders. Finally there are 71 pages of drawings … 18 pages of general arrangements, 2 pages of hull construction, 6 pages of machinery, 2 pages of general arrangement of accommodations, 12 pages showing changes in superstructure from 1943 to 1959, 3 pages of rigging, 21 pages of armament, four pages of exterior fire control equipment, 8 pages of fittings, 2 pages of ground tackle, and 4 pages of ships boats.

In conclusion, both books give a good design history for naval historians and lots of useful photos and drawings for the model builder. Raven’s book has slightly better data for the model builder but Ross’s book would still offer some extra useful information. Ross’s book also has data and drawings of the machinery which are completely lacking from Raven’s book.

Readers who would like even more super details of similar US destroyers will enjoy "Sumner-Gearing-Class Destroyers" by Robert Sumrall, c. 1995, 289 pages.