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All Our Yesterdays epub download

by Jr. Warner Harry


All Our Yesterdays by Harry Warner, J. is a history of science fiction fandom of the 1940s, an essential reference work in the field.

All Our Yesterdays by Harry Warner, J. It was originally published by Advent in 1969; the members of the World Science Fiction Society voted its author the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer that year.

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Book by Warner, Harry, J. Harry Warner J. Walther Riedel, Henry Slesar, Bryce Walton, Charles L. Fontenay, Richard Wilson, Don Berry, Russ Winterbotham.

Harry Warner J. is a history of science fiction fandom of the 1940s, an essential . Warner also wrote a related series of historical columns called "All Our Yesterdays. A Wealth of Fable by Harry Warner, J. is a Hugo Award-winning history of science fiction fandom of the 1950s, an essential reference work in the field. Warner also wrote a related series of historical columns called "All Our Yesterdays Reception

All Our Yesterdays by Harry Warner, J. Warner also wrote a related series of historical columns called "All Our Yesterdays

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Items related to All Our Yesterdays. Home Warner, Harry Jr. All Our Yesterdays. ISBN 10: 1886778132, ISBN 13: 9781886778139. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller.

Book by Warner, Harry, Jr.

All Our Yesterdays epub download

ISBN13: 978-0911682007

ISBN: 0911682007

Author: Jr. Warner Harry

Category: History

Subcategory: Historical Study & Educational Resources

Language: English

Publisher: Advent Pub Inc; 1st edition (June 1, 1970)

Pages: 336 pages

ePUB size: 1764 kb

FB2 size: 1966 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 433

Other Formats: mobi docx rtf mbr

Related to All Our Yesterdays ePub books

Zeli
_All our Yesterdays_ by Harry Warner jr. tells the story of science fiction fandom (the enthusiast circles around the genre) of the 40ies. The story is one of very talented and passionate people, often quite young, who believed in the genre and technology and science, especially space exploration. It also chronicles their strivings to organise and express themselves, as well as som in-fighting. One thing that strikes me is how like itself fandom seems to be, although I live in another country than the US and my father was born in the 40ies, there are a lot of things here that I, as a modern science fiction fan, can relate to. _All our Yesterdays_ is also touching in places when it comes to the real world intruding on the world of fandom: young fans who join the armed and sometimes fall in combat. This book is illustrated with fascinating photographs. An obligatory read for fans interested in the history of fanzines and fandom.
Zeli
_All our Yesterdays_ by Harry Warner jr. tells the story of science fiction fandom (the enthusiast circles around the genre) of the 40ies. The story is one of very talented and passionate people, often quite young, who believed in the genre and technology and science, especially space exploration. It also chronicles their strivings to organise and express themselves, as well as som in-fighting. One thing that strikes me is how like itself fandom seems to be, although I live in another country than the US and my father was born in the 40ies, there are a lot of things here that I, as a modern science fiction fan, can relate to. _All our Yesterdays_ is also touching in places when it comes to the real world intruding on the world of fandom: young fans who join the armed and sometimes fall in combat. This book is illustrated with fascinating photographs. An obligatory read for fans interested in the history of fanzines and fandom.
Duktilar
Harry Warner Jr. was a print journalist for the Hagerstown Journal, a published science fiction writer and a hobbyist in the fanzine-publishing microcosm of sf fandom practically from its inception. His first fanzine, SPACEWAYS, was the preeminent fanzine of its time; his second fanzine, HORIZONS, missed only two quarterly mailings of the Fantasy Amateur Press Association over the next half century.

This history of early fandom resulted from a wry remark Warner made regarding the only previously published history of that era, Sam Moskowitz's The Immortal Storm, to the effect that those who had not been there needed to have someone who had reading over their shoulder to point out that it was not, despite what the prose might make you believe, the history of WWII with the original cast, but rather a highly personal account of wrangling over political opinions expressed in fanzines published via pan hectograph in editions often less than 50 copies by fans who for the most part ranged in age from 13 to 18. Moskowitz promptly challenged Warner do it better if he could.

Warner not only could but did, and this is the result--impeccably researched and entertainingly told. And without once (as Moskowitz had) referring to himself in the third person.

Mind, once you have the Warner to provide perspective, the Moskowitz is still worth reading, if only for the amusement.
Duktilar
Harry Warner Jr. was a print journalist for the Hagerstown Journal, a published science fiction writer and a hobbyist in the fanzine-publishing microcosm of sf fandom practically from its inception. His first fanzine, SPACEWAYS, was the preeminent fanzine of its time; his second fanzine, HORIZONS, missed only two quarterly mailings of the Fantasy Amateur Press Association over the next half century.

This history of early fandom resulted from a wry remark Warner made regarding the only previously published history of that era, Sam Moskowitz's The Immortal Storm, to the effect that those who had not been there needed to have someone who had reading over their shoulder to point out that it was not, despite what the prose might make you believe, the history of WWII with the original cast, but rather a highly personal account of wrangling over political opinions expressed in fanzines published via pan hectograph in editions often less than 50 copies by fans who for the most part ranged in age from 13 to 18. Moskowitz promptly challenged Warner do it better if he could.

Warner not only could but did, and this is the result--impeccably researched and entertainingly told. And without once (as Moskowitz had) referring to himself in the third person.

Mind, once you have the Warner to provide perspective, the Moskowitz is still worth reading, if only for the amusement.