» » Venice 697 - 1797: City - Republic - Empire

Venice 697 - 1797: City - Republic - Empire epub download

by Alvise ZORZI


VENICE 697 - 1797: A City, A Republic, An Empire is as satisfying an overview of the supreme city of. .

We can only hope that he elects to present us with "Venice 1797 to 2004" and help us understand this enigmatic, slowly sinking jewel that has attracted lovers, poets, painters, musicians and writers for centuries from his present day stance.

Venice 697-1797 book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Venice 697-1797: A City, A Republic, An Empire as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Venice 697 - 1797 City Republic . Authors: Zorzi, Alvise. Venice 697 - 1797: City, Republic, Empire. Title: Venice 697 - 1797: City, Republic, Empire.

Authors: Zorzi, Alvise. Condition: Used; Good.

It lasted from 697 AD until 1797 AD. Centered on the lagoon communities of the prosperous city of Venice, the republic . Zorzi, Alvise (1983). Venice: The Golden Age, 697 – 1797. Centered on the lagoon communities of the prosperous city of Venice, the republic grew into a trading power during the Middle Ages and strengthened this position in the Renaissance. New York: Abbeville Press. p. 255. ISBN 0896594068.

Items related to Venice 697-1797: A City, A Republic, An Empire. Alvise Zorzi was born in Venice of an old noble family. Italian author and journalist Zorzi, a native of Venice, has published a number of books on the city (. Venetian Palaces; Venice: A Journey of Dreams). Aluise Zorzi Venice 697-1797: A City, A Republic, An Empire. ISBN 13: 9781585671328. He is the chairman of the Committee for the Publication of Source Material on the History of Venice.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Venice 697 1797 A City, A Republic, An Empire.

Venice, 697-1797 : A City, a Republic, an Empire.

Venice 697-1797 : A City, a Republic, an Empire. By (author) Alvise Zorzi. In selecting the more than 340 full-color illustrations, Zorzi has brought together a sumptuous collection of paintings and drawings, photographs and engravings.

1797, Doges of Venice, Ludovico Manin. Reverse:Winged and nimbate lion of St. Mark holding book of gospels. Manin was born on May 14, 1725, the eldest of five sons of Lodovico Alvise and Maria Basadonna, the great-granddaughter of a cardinal. He attended the University of Bologna. Silver Tallero per il Levante Coin. Mint year: 1797 Doge: Ludovico Manin (1789-1797) Assayer: Alessandro Semitecolo (AS) Reference: Davenport 1575, KM-C. Legend: LUDO VICO MANIN DUCE § Exergue: 1796 . For your consideration a beautiful example of a silver tallero (venetian thaler), also known as "Tallero per il Levante", which means thaler for the Levant.

Oversized book, very heavy. Will require additional postage. A small marking dot on bottom edge, otherwise a near fine copy.

Venice 697 - 1797: City - Republic - Empire epub download

ISBN13: 978-0283989841

ISBN: 028398984X

Author: Alvise ZORZI

Category: History

Subcategory: Europe

Language: English

Publisher: Sidgwick & Jackson; 1st Ed. edition (1983)

Pages: 280 pages

ePUB size: 1446 kb

FB2 size: 1821 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 102

Other Formats: doc lit lrf lrf

Related to Venice 697 - 1797: City - Republic - Empire ePub books

Cel
There are many books available on the history of Venice, but there is probably no book as beautifully illustrated as this one. It contains many beautiful prints of paintings, sculptures, etc. as well as excellent photographs of the city. The book also provides a very good general overview of the history of Venice. The author is somewhat biased, by his own admission, about the "glory" of Venice and its history, and, thus, some degree of objectivity may have been lost in the telling of the history. Nevertheless, for anyone who is interested in Venice and its history, this book will provide many rewards.
Cel
There are many books available on the history of Venice, but there is probably no book as beautifully illustrated as this one. It contains many beautiful prints of paintings, sculptures, etc. as well as excellent photographs of the city. The book also provides a very good general overview of the history of Venice. The author is somewhat biased, by his own admission, about the "glory" of Venice and its history, and, thus, some degree of objectivity may have been lost in the telling of the history. Nevertheless, for anyone who is interested in Venice and its history, this book will provide many rewards.
Rindyt
Great visuals--a real history of Venice with plenty of pictures to keep you interested. Makes visiting Venice a must!
Rindyt
Great visuals--a real history of Venice with plenty of pictures to keep you interested. Makes visiting Venice a must!
Ynye
VENICE 697 - 1797: A City, A Republic, An Empire is as satisfying an overview of the supreme city of Venice, Italy as is available. Other books may be more academically researched, written and presented and other books on the various aspects of this ageless city - its art, architecture, Carnivale expositions, idiosyncratic glass, music - are definitely more complete. But the primary reason for the success of this book is in the writing by Alvise Zorzi, a resident of Venice who treats us to a personal tour of what makes Venice so magical. Richly illustrated, wisely paced with interesting sidebars during the history portions, Zorzi relates the treasures of Venice with an endearing love that makes both known and new facts a joy to visit. At the end of this book he has created glossaries of terms, of the lineage of Doges, a fine chronology, and (with a tender bit of pride) a list of the Venetian Patriciate that of course lists existing families of noble birth as of 1999! Quite frankly Zorzi has the gift to crystallize the stages in Venice's development as a capital of Europe more meaningfully than other writers' compendia. We can only hope that he elects to present us with "Venice 1797 to 2004" and help us understand this enigmatic, slowly sinking jewel that has attracted lovers, poets, painters, musicians and writers for centuries from his present day stance. A beautiful book for any collection!
Ynye
VENICE 697 - 1797: A City, A Republic, An Empire is as satisfying an overview of the supreme city of Venice, Italy as is available. Other books may be more academically researched, written and presented and other books on the various aspects of this ageless city - its art, architecture, Carnivale expositions, idiosyncratic glass, music - are definitely more complete. But the primary reason for the success of this book is in the writing by Alvise Zorzi, a resident of Venice who treats us to a personal tour of what makes Venice so magical. Richly illustrated, wisely paced with interesting sidebars during the history portions, Zorzi relates the treasures of Venice with an endearing love that makes both known and new facts a joy to visit. At the end of this book he has created glossaries of terms, of the lineage of Doges, a fine chronology, and (with a tender bit of pride) a list of the Venetian Patriciate that of course lists existing families of noble birth as of 1999! Quite frankly Zorzi has the gift to crystallize the stages in Venice's development as a capital of Europe more meaningfully than other writers' compendia. We can only hope that he elects to present us with "Venice 1797 to 2004" and help us understand this enigmatic, slowly sinking jewel that has attracted lovers, poets, painters, musicians and writers for centuries from his present day stance. A beautiful book for any collection!
Kagaramar
Today the city of Venice is associated with love, song, harmless frivolity and the Italian joy of life. Such things are not to be scorned within their proper place-this world's life is not so rich in joy that we can afford to scorn such things. But that Venice is a glimpse of what it was-a fairy princess retaining her beauty but shorn of her power, majesty and menace. There was once another Venice. A city where merchants were kings(as some Victorian poet puts it). A city of furious energy. A city of Empire-builders, Adventurers, mighty in war and magnificient in peace. A city of every virtue except humility and every vice except sloth.
Alvise Zorzi gives a splendid portrait of that city. He writes in an engaging manner expressing a gentle but unashamed local patriotism toward his beloved city. He tells anecdotes of various kinds, and describes various aspects of the life of Venice. Combined with the beautiful photos and paintings, which are given, this book is a marvelous thing. The book makes you share the love and enthusiasm for Venice expressed in Venice's old battle cry, "Vive San Marco!"
Kagaramar
Today the city of Venice is associated with love, song, harmless frivolity and the Italian joy of life. Such things are not to be scorned within their proper place-this world's life is not so rich in joy that we can afford to scorn such things. But that Venice is a glimpse of what it was-a fairy princess retaining her beauty but shorn of her power, majesty and menace. There was once another Venice. A city where merchants were kings(as some Victorian poet puts it). A city of furious energy. A city of Empire-builders, Adventurers, mighty in war and magnificient in peace. A city of every virtue except humility and every vice except sloth.
Alvise Zorzi gives a splendid portrait of that city. He writes in an engaging manner expressing a gentle but unashamed local patriotism toward his beloved city. He tells anecdotes of various kinds, and describes various aspects of the life of Venice. Combined with the beautiful photos and paintings, which are given, this book is a marvelous thing. The book makes you share the love and enthusiasm for Venice expressed in Venice's old battle cry, "Vive San Marco!"
Felolak
This book is a wondrous thing. It is a coffee table volume in which the author expresses his immense love of his native city. An earlier review called it "unobjective". Quite true. I would regard someone who was not biased toward his homeland at about the same level as someone who is not biased toward his wife.
The author makes no attempt to be objective. On the contrary it is a refreshingly unabashed display of regional patriotism. But it is more. The author writes in a pleasant and amiable manner, and has a great amount of both knowledge and taste. Combined with beautiful photographs and pictures, the writer gives a worthy attempt to describe Venice in all it's splendour.
This is not primarily a book about the new Venice of lovers and tourists. It is about the old Venice, of beautiful women and brave men. Of Traders, Warriors, Statesmen, Adventurers, and Empire-builders. The city of enterprise and initiative. The city of every vice except sloth and every virtue except humility. This is the city from which Marco Polo ventured on his quest to Fair Cathay, and from which the galleys rode forth under the banner of St Mark, to fight for Christiandom and revenge against the Ottoman armada in the bloodstained Gulf of Lepanto. While in many places merchants were sneered at by aristocrats, these same men cringed in terror at the banner of St Mark, a place where merchants were princes. It was cities like this that kept the flame of liberty smouldering through the Middle Ages and if their claims in this matter were often shadowed by injustice, of whom can this not be said?
Zorzi, a descendant of a Venetian Noble family, gives a splendid overview of Venice. He shows it's governmental forms, and it's policies in war and peace. He also shows it's trade by land and by sea. There are also descriptions of such subjects as Venetian cooking and architecture and interesting personalities.
This work is a work of love and communicates the author's love to the reader. It is an old friend of mine, and it can be so for you too.

Jason Taylor(son of John Taylor)
Felolak
This book is a wondrous thing. It is a coffee table volume in which the author expresses his immense love of his native city. An earlier review called it "unobjective". Quite true. I would regard someone who was not biased toward his homeland at about the same level as someone who is not biased toward his wife.
The author makes no attempt to be objective. On the contrary it is a refreshingly unabashed display of regional patriotism. But it is more. The author writes in a pleasant and amiable manner, and has a great amount of both knowledge and taste. Combined with beautiful photographs and pictures, the writer gives a worthy attempt to describe Venice in all it's splendour.
This is not primarily a book about the new Venice of lovers and tourists. It is about the old Venice, of beautiful women and brave men. Of Traders, Warriors, Statesmen, Adventurers, and Empire-builders. The city of enterprise and initiative. The city of every vice except sloth and every virtue except humility. This is the city from which Marco Polo ventured on his quest to Fair Cathay, and from which the galleys rode forth under the banner of St Mark, to fight for Christiandom and revenge against the Ottoman armada in the bloodstained Gulf of Lepanto. While in many places merchants were sneered at by aristocrats, these same men cringed in terror at the banner of St Mark, a place where merchants were princes. It was cities like this that kept the flame of liberty smouldering through the Middle Ages and if their claims in this matter were often shadowed by injustice, of whom can this not be said?
Zorzi, a descendant of a Venetian Noble family, gives a splendid overview of Venice. He shows it's governmental forms, and it's policies in war and peace. He also shows it's trade by land and by sea. There are also descriptions of such subjects as Venetian cooking and architecture and interesting personalities.
This work is a work of love and communicates the author's love to the reader. It is an old friend of mine, and it can be so for you too.

Jason Taylor(son of John Taylor)