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The Miracle of Castel Di Sangro epub download

by Dick Hill,Joe McGinniss


Here hears about a very small town, Castel di Sangro, having achieved the 'miracle' of reaching the second highest tier in Italian football.

Here hears about a very small town, Castel di Sangro, having achieved the 'miracle' of reaching the second highest tier in Italian football. And so he decides to move there to spend an entire season following the team. He is sort of adopted by the team and gets to go everywhere with them.

Castel di Sangro Calcio is an Italian association football club from Castel di Sangro in the Province of L'Aquila, Abruzzo. They play in Promozione. Their moment of greatness came in 1996, when they were promoted to Serie B, a noteworthy accomplishment for a team coming from a town of only 5,500 residents. Even greater, they were able to survive in that league another year. The story of their first season in Serie B is chronicled in the book The Miracle of Castel di Sangro by Joe McGinniss.

This book should've been called Joe McGinniss Goes to Italy So That Joe McGinniss Can Talk to Italians and . McGinniss gave up the chance to write a book on . so he could do & Miracle of Castel di Sangro'' instead

This book should've been called Joe McGinniss Goes to Italy So That Joe McGinniss Can Talk to Italians and Report on how They React to Joe McGinniss by Joe McGinniss. so he could do & Miracle of Castel di Sangro'' instead. That must have been an easy decision, but still, it impresses the small-town Mafioso who runs the team in Castel di Sangro, which has somehow worked its way up to Serie B, the Triple-A of Italy's fanatical soccer world (the & of the title).

After the success of his book in 1968, McGinniss left the Inquirer to write books full-time. He next wrote a novel, The Dream Team. His next book was the critically acclaimed The Miracle of Castel di Sangro. Published in 1999, the book followed the fortunes of an Italian soccer team from a tiny town during one dramatic season in the big leagues. The Big Horse was published in 2004.

But Dick Hill's spirited narration and McGinniss's boundless enthusiasm make it seem not that crazy a project. Hill captures the passion the players feel for the game, masters a plausible Italian accent, and gracefully handles the passages in which the conversation runs in Italian with English translation following. Memorable characters crowd the program, with Hill catching their essence, including the likable players; the frustrated author; the bullying, strong-willed coach; and the omnipresent owner and manager, who have other goals for the team besides winning the season.

When Joe McGinniss sets out for the remote Italian village of Castel di Sangro one summer, he merely intends to. .

When Joe McGinniss sets out for the remote Italian village of Castel di Sangro one summer, he merely intends to spend a season with the village's soccer team, which only weeks before had, miraculously, reached the ng professional league in the land. Traveling with the miracle team, from the isolated mountain region where Castel di Sangro is located to gritty towns as well as grand cities, McGinniss introduces us to an Italy that no tourist guidebook has ever described, and comes away with a "sad, funny, desolating, and inspiring story-everything, in fact, a story should be" (Los Angeles Times).

McGinniss, Joe. Publication date. 20th Century Description And Travel, Soccer, Sports & Recreation, History, Europe - Italy, Castel di Sangro (Soccer team), Italy, McGinniss, Joe. Publisher. Boston : Little, Brown. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on October 4, 2012.

Author: Joe McGinniss ISBN 10: 0316644730 Through 1996 and 1997 Joe McGinniss followed the Italian football season from Castel di Sangro, a small town in the Abruzzi region of Italy.

Author: Joe McGinniss ISBN 10: 0316644730. All used books sold by Book Fountain All new books sold by Book Fountain Books will be free of page markings. Through 1996 and 1997 Joe McGinniss followed the Italian football season from Castel di Sangro, a small town in the Abruzzi region of Italy. This is the story of a team and a town with aspirations, just a passion for soccer, and how that passion enabled the di Sangro club to reach almost the top of the professional game in Italy. It is the story of how a a dot on the map was transformed into a place of sporting magic, miracles and wonder.

Through 1996 and 1997 bestselling author Joe McGinniss followed the Italian football season from Castel di Sangro, a small town nestled in the Abruzzi region of Italy.

From Joe McGinniss, one of our greatest storytellers, comes the extraordinary true drama of success against all odds - and the inevitable comedy of human foibles. Castel Di Sangro is a tiny town in the Abruzzo region of Italy, whose soccer team became an international sensation by winning promotion to the highest levels of national competition. For the team from this tiny village to be playing against the teams of Genoa and Venice was more than a dream come true - it was inconceivable. But truth can be stranger than dreams, as Joe McGinniss discovered when he arrived in Castel Di Sangro. A recent convert to soccer, he wanted to experience life in a town turned upside down by the game. What he found was a cavalcade of euphoria, betrayal, grief, and euphoria again - an entire town living in an emotional frenzy unlike anything since the local battle of World War II. McGinniss lost himself totally to the team - a boisterous collection of characters the reader will grow to love - and found a story whose depth and power enthralled him. Like Field of Dreams and Chariots of Fire, this is a masterpiece of storytelling that transcends sports to embrace universal human emotions.

The Miracle of Castel Di Sangro epub download

ISBN13: 978-1567406566

ISBN: 1567406564

Author: Dick Hill,Joe McGinniss

Category: History

Subcategory: Europe

Language: English

Publisher: Unabridged Library Edition; Unabridged edition (May 20, 1999)

ePUB size: 1355 kb

FB2 size: 1504 kb

Rating: 4.3

Votes: 212

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Related to The Miracle of Castel Di Sangro ePub books

Saberdragon
It's been quite some time since I was moved to write a review. This book, a suggestion by a stranger upon hearing that I wanted to learn more about soccer, and Italian soccer in particular suggested this book. I'm not going to go into the story or background because many reviewers do that well and I want some things to remain a surprise. This is s story about that is about soccer yes and Italy. It is even more about the heart and soul of athletes. It is about human nature, ups and downs, savage disappointments, triumphs unimaginable, twists and turns unforeseen, laughs, and finding a place in the world. It is also about balances and soft voices...

I was so sad to read that Joe McGinnis had passed away in 2014. I so wanted to write him a thank you note for teaching me about joy and perspective and soccer. And affirming my love for the complexities of Italy. And this book above all. I refuse to lend to any one because I ways want it near to look at. Selfish? Maybe. In the end, I can't stop thinking of it.

It's all like a movie, Joe.
Saberdragon
It's been quite some time since I was moved to write a review. This book, a suggestion by a stranger upon hearing that I wanted to learn more about soccer, and Italian soccer in particular suggested this book. I'm not going to go into the story or background because many reviewers do that well and I want some things to remain a surprise. This is s story about that is about soccer yes and Italy. It is even more about the heart and soul of athletes. It is about human nature, ups and downs, savage disappointments, triumphs unimaginable, twists and turns unforeseen, laughs, and finding a place in the world. It is also about balances and soft voices...

I was so sad to read that Joe McGinnis had passed away in 2014. I so wanted to write him a thank you note for teaching me about joy and perspective and soccer. And affirming my love for the complexities of Italy. And this book above all. I refuse to lend to any one because I ways want it near to look at. Selfish? Maybe. In the end, I can't stop thinking of it.

It's all like a movie, Joe.
Roru
This was fun, if you're a fan of soccer/football or you love Italy. Many good stories and characters. Best to learn the author's Italian as he learns it. Once he mentions a word he will use it again and expect you to remember. That's ok. But the author, to me, seemed rude and intrusive in the world and situation he was experiencing. He came across, at times, as the typical ugly American.
But he was a good writer and he truly immerses himself in his subjects. (I've read a couple of his other books). But is you don't care for soccer this one might be either a puzzle to you, or just plain irritating.
Roru
This was fun, if you're a fan of soccer/football or you love Italy. Many good stories and characters. Best to learn the author's Italian as he learns it. Once he mentions a word he will use it again and expect you to remember. That's ok. But the author, to me, seemed rude and intrusive in the world and situation he was experiencing. He came across, at times, as the typical ugly American.
But he was a good writer and he truly immerses himself in his subjects. (I've read a couple of his other books). But is you don't care for soccer this one might be either a puzzle to you, or just plain irritating.
Dellevar
Inside there is a great story of uncelebrated heroes, and villians, behind what might be considered the more mundane situation -- that a soccer team from a small village manages promotion to a B league with the season-long goal of surviving. Along the way, there are many great details of the local players, supporters, life within Serie B soccer, and the fabric of society in a small, working-class Italian hillside town. Set on this smaller stage, the story has it all -- life, death, compassion, greed, character, and corruption -- woven together with many amusing and curious subtexts and insights about a "strainero" trying to fit in to a whole other culture and language.
The story is a great success at real-life drama. The only unfortunate part is that the story slowly unravels how much the author completely blew a real opportunity to fit in more and delve deeper beneath the surface of his adopted society -- opting more and more to impose his own self-righteous mindset and judgement on matters (he was as much a "bulldozer" as he accused the soccer team's manager of being) rather than taking a step back to learn more about the inner workings of another culture. This isn't ethnocentrism or even an example of American arrogance -- the author simply self-destructed at his mission to respect, observe, and ask in order to learn and report.
Even so, the book is a great success in spite of the author's mistakes. He gained access to a remote, close-knit community amidst the throes of of several major events -- also capturing moments of great humor. The author's detailed accounting of his conversations and experiences there makes it a fascinating story in its own right.
Dellevar
Inside there is a great story of uncelebrated heroes, and villians, behind what might be considered the more mundane situation -- that a soccer team from a small village manages promotion to a B league with the season-long goal of surviving. Along the way, there are many great details of the local players, supporters, life within Serie B soccer, and the fabric of society in a small, working-class Italian hillside town. Set on this smaller stage, the story has it all -- life, death, compassion, greed, character, and corruption -- woven together with many amusing and curious subtexts and insights about a "strainero" trying to fit in to a whole other culture and language.
The story is a great success at real-life drama. The only unfortunate part is that the story slowly unravels how much the author completely blew a real opportunity to fit in more and delve deeper beneath the surface of his adopted society -- opting more and more to impose his own self-righteous mindset and judgement on matters (he was as much a "bulldozer" as he accused the soccer team's manager of being) rather than taking a step back to learn more about the inner workings of another culture. This isn't ethnocentrism or even an example of American arrogance -- the author simply self-destructed at his mission to respect, observe, and ask in order to learn and report.
Even so, the book is a great success in spite of the author's mistakes. He gained access to a remote, close-knit community amidst the throes of of several major events -- also capturing moments of great humor. The author's detailed accounting of his conversations and experiences there makes it a fascinating story in its own right.
Reighbyra
What a deliciously captivating idea! An American moves to Italy to follow and hopefully befriend a soccer team through its full upstart season. Mr. McGinniss enthusiastically begins with all the innocence and excitement one would hope, and the reader is quickly immersed in the author's exhilaration and joy as the book unfolds. Unfortunately as Mr. McGinniss' envelopment in the team and town of Castel di Sangro deepens, so does his acrimony and contention. One can appreciate that what he is trying to convey to the readers is his own gradual emotional transformation here, as he becomes increasingly disillusioned with the apparent dirt behind this magnificent team and its "miracle." What Mr. McGinniss ends up doing however is gradually imposing his own opinions and judgements both on the people in this fine town and in the end on the poor reader himself. As he gradually alienates himself from players, manager and owner, so too does he gradually alienate himself from the readers. In the end Mr. McGinniss can only see Italy and it's complex culture of "football" through the eyes of an ugly, vindictive American, and one is left only with distaste for the author. Nevertheless this bittersweet journey of Mr. McGinniss has many warm, evocative and beautifully insightful moments and at times can be marvelously enjoyable
Reighbyra
What a deliciously captivating idea! An American moves to Italy to follow and hopefully befriend a soccer team through its full upstart season. Mr. McGinniss enthusiastically begins with all the innocence and excitement one would hope, and the reader is quickly immersed in the author's exhilaration and joy as the book unfolds. Unfortunately as Mr. McGinniss' envelopment in the team and town of Castel di Sangro deepens, so does his acrimony and contention. One can appreciate that what he is trying to convey to the readers is his own gradual emotional transformation here, as he becomes increasingly disillusioned with the apparent dirt behind this magnificent team and its "miracle." What Mr. McGinniss ends up doing however is gradually imposing his own opinions and judgements both on the people in this fine town and in the end on the poor reader himself. As he gradually alienates himself from players, manager and owner, so too does he gradually alienate himself from the readers. In the end Mr. McGinniss can only see Italy and it's complex culture of "football" through the eyes of an ugly, vindictive American, and one is left only with distaste for the author. Nevertheless this bittersweet journey of Mr. McGinniss has many warm, evocative and beautifully insightful moments and at times can be marvelously enjoyable
Mullador
I have not read anything else by Joe McGinnis, and stumbled acrosse this book while researching my maternal grandfather's birthplace of Chieti, Italy. Since I wanted to read something about life in Abruzzo, and I do like soccer, I took a chance. I was pleasently surprised and enjoyed this book very much. The style reminded me of the works of Paul Theroux and William Least Heat Moon - a travel adventure in which the author is a character in the story, leavened with McGinnis's entertaining sense of humor .
Mullador
I have not read anything else by Joe McGinnis, and stumbled acrosse this book while researching my maternal grandfather's birthplace of Chieti, Italy. Since I wanted to read something about life in Abruzzo, and I do like soccer, I took a chance. I was pleasently surprised and enjoyed this book very much. The style reminded me of the works of Paul Theroux and William Least Heat Moon - a travel adventure in which the author is a character in the story, leavened with McGinnis's entertaining sense of humor .