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The French Revolution epub download

by Thomas Carlyle


The French Revolution: A History was written by the Scottish essayist, philosopher, and historian Thomas Carlyle

The French Revolution: A History was written by the Scottish essayist, philosopher, and historian Thomas Carlyle.

Here Carlyle wrote The French Revolution: A History (2 volumes, 1837), a. .Watercolor sketch of Thomas Carlyle, age 46, by Samuel Laurence

Watercolor sketch of Thomas Carlyle, age 46, by Samuel Laurence. The Everlasting Yea is Carlyle's name in the book for the spirit of faith in God in an express attitude of clear, resolute, steady, and uncompromising antagonism to the Everlasting No; that is against the principle that there is no such thing as faith in God except in such antagonism to the spirit opposed to Go.

The French Revolution book. The book that established Thomas Carlyle’s reputation when first published in 1837, this spectacular historical masterpiece has since been accepted as the standard work on the subject.

Title: The French Revolution. Author: Thomas Carlyle. Place de la Révolution. Release Date: February 15, 2006 Last Updated: November 2, 2019. Character set encoding: UTF-8 . Start of this project gutenberg ebook the french revolution . Produced by Sue Asscher and David Widger. The french revolution. The french revolution a history. Volume I. The bastille. Death of louis XV. Chapter .

The French Revolution' by Thomas Carlyle. Published by Good Press

The French Revolution' by Thomas Carlyle. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre.

He is gone, then, and has not seen us?

He is gone, then, and has not seen us?

The French Revolution: A HistoryHardcover – 8 August 2015. by Thomas Carlyle(Author). The book succeeds in portraying such of the more dramatic events of the Revolution with a striking immediacy that makes the book worthwhile.

The French Revolution: A HistoryHardcover – 8 August 2015.

The French Revolution: A History was written by the Scottish essayist, philosopher, and historian Thomas Carlyle. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. The three-volume work. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Бесплатный фрагмент - The French Revolution. Those lank scarecrows, that prowl hunger-stricken through all highways and byways of French Existence, will they pray?

Бесплатный фрагмент - The French Revolution. Историческая проза Классическая проза Электронная Печатная А5 Русский. Those lank scarecrows, that prowl hunger-stricken through all highways and byways of French Existence, will they pray? The dull millions that, in the workshop or furrowfield, grind fore-done at the wheel of Labour, like haltered gin-horses, if blind so much the quieter? Or they that in the Bicêtre Hospital, ‘eight to a bed, lie waiting their manumission?

The French Revolution (Chap. Retreat of the Eleven.

Album The French Revolution. The French Revolution (Chap. It is one of the notablest Retreats, this of the Eleven, that History presents: The handful of forlorn Legislators retreating there, continually, with shouldered firelock and well-filled cartridge-box, in the yellow autumn; long hundreds of miles between them and Bourdeaux; the country all getting hostile, suspicious of the truth; simmering and buzzing on all sides, more and more. Louvet has preserved the Itinerary of it; a piece worth all the rest he ever wrote

The French Revolution epub download

ISBN13: 978-0192839671

ISBN: 0192839675

Author: Thomas Carlyle

Category: History

Subcategory: Europe

Language: English

Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

ePUB size: 1126 kb

FB2 size: 1779 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 569

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Related to The French Revolution ePub books

Morlunn
I avoided this book for a long time because of its length and difficult language, but needed a comprehensive overview of the revolution to fit together all the bits and pieces of knowledge I had about it. It takes effort to read this book but it's well worth it! It is a classic, for good reason. It gives you an "insider's" view of the whole thing. It's not intended for casual reading entertainment but neither is it boring like reading an encyclopedia. I have a much better understanding now of the people, politics, events, causes and consequences of this violent episode of history. It is interesting, interpretive, factual and action packed! Such cruel, unjust,brutal and violent turmoil makes one thank God that we didn't have to live through it!
Morlunn
I avoided this book for a long time because of its length and difficult language, but needed a comprehensive overview of the revolution to fit together all the bits and pieces of knowledge I had about it. It takes effort to read this book but it's well worth it! It is a classic, for good reason. It gives you an "insider's" view of the whole thing. It's not intended for casual reading entertainment but neither is it boring like reading an encyclopedia. I have a much better understanding now of the people, politics, events, causes and consequences of this violent episode of history. It is interesting, interpretive, factual and action packed! Such cruel, unjust,brutal and violent turmoil makes one thank God that we didn't have to live through it!
Whiteflame
Bob-Blair.org has an amazing annotated copy of THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. Working through its first chapters, I find that the first chapter requires a fairly good knowledge of Louis XV's reign, which Wikipedia or Bob Blair's site can give you.

The next chapters are absolutely lucid, and state clearly and repeatedly that the great causes of the French Revolution are the decline of the nobility, the exploitation of the poor, and a general atmosphere of skepticism. Loss of belief, Carlyle says, leads to an outbreak of the diabolical in human beings.

Dickens got almost all his feeling for the French Revolution from Carlyle's history. In their time the revolution was no farther away than World War Two is from us, which means they had a good general feel for it. Even at our present distance, it's not that tough to read Carlyle -- and his main points, rather than being hidden as some reviewers have said, are virtually screamed at the reader over and over again.

Those who call his writing stilted don't know what "stilted" means. It means pompous and over-formal. Carlyle coined words and wrote the kind of wild poetry that influenced Melville in his MOBY DICK. That's not stilted. Calling it stilted is like calling a rock star soft.

It is a poetic style, for sure. The Modern Library introducer compares it with Milton's. He also calls the book a kind of epic. If you don't like epic poetry, don't read Carlyle. He won't miss you; I won't miss you; and you'll be so much happier wherever you end up.
Whiteflame
Bob-Blair.org has an amazing annotated copy of THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. Working through its first chapters, I find that the first chapter requires a fairly good knowledge of Louis XV's reign, which Wikipedia or Bob Blair's site can give you.

The next chapters are absolutely lucid, and state clearly and repeatedly that the great causes of the French Revolution are the decline of the nobility, the exploitation of the poor, and a general atmosphere of skepticism. Loss of belief, Carlyle says, leads to an outbreak of the diabolical in human beings.

Dickens got almost all his feeling for the French Revolution from Carlyle's history. In their time the revolution was no farther away than World War Two is from us, which means they had a good general feel for it. Even at our present distance, it's not that tough to read Carlyle -- and his main points, rather than being hidden as some reviewers have said, are virtually screamed at the reader over and over again.

Those who call his writing stilted don't know what "stilted" means. It means pompous and over-formal. Carlyle coined words and wrote the kind of wild poetry that influenced Melville in his MOBY DICK. That's not stilted. Calling it stilted is like calling a rock star soft.

It is a poetic style, for sure. The Modern Library introducer compares it with Milton's. He also calls the book a kind of epic. If you don't like epic poetry, don't read Carlyle. He won't miss you; I won't miss you; and you'll be so much happier wherever you end up.
The Sinners from Mitar
I don’t consider myself equal to the task of writing a review of Carlyle’s works simply because I consider him to be one of the greatest writers of his Age; second perhaps only to Edmund Burke. I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge that plumbing these depths is a challenge. However I will scribble a few notes here for anyone wishing to brave these waters and start off by admitting that for the layman and others such as myself, finishing the book from cover to cover can be a daunting task. However, if you set your sails aright, despite the obstacles, it can prove a most rewarding venture. Strenuous.. maybe- Arduous.. a little.. But well worth the effort. To be sure, the reader will encounter a vast array of names and places that will sound foreign to his ear; players and actors who have long since left the world stage. Despite time and history having buried many of these names beneath her proud waves these waters are still navigable

Alex de Tocqueville wrote that: “The American Revolution was caused by a mature and thoughtful taste for freedom. No disorderly passions drove it. On the contrary, it proceeded hand in hand with a love of order and legality”. Not so the French Revolution. It was sudden, violent and unforgiving. Tens of thousands of people lost their lives. And the way they were murdered (there is no other name for it) was particularly cruel, brutal and vicious. The bodies of victims were often mutilated and dismembered; heads stuck on the end of pikes and paraded through towns and cities. Hundreds of priests were tied up and put on boats; the boats then deliberately and purposely sunk; all drowned- there were no survivors (Pg. 691). The Tannery in Meudon where the flaying, butchering and skinning of human corpses (both men and woman) took place (Pg. 712) for making breeches, pants, and clothing. Gruesome and horrifically evil, but true. Apparently, the Nazis weren’t first to find new uses for human skin. And (if you have the stomach for it) you can do an internet search on Princess de Lamballe. The actual details of her murder were so unspeakable that Carlyle refused to commit them to writing.
Like Arjuna who looked with unshielded eyes into the mouth of Krishna before the battle of Kurukshetra and saw worlds and universes unfold before him; so too Carlyle looks into the maw of the French Revolution. Carlyle takes up the challenge by asking what exactly the French Revolution was all about? What did it all mean? What did it signify? How is it to be interpreted? Do we even have (he asks) the tools to dare attempt an interpretation? In the end, Carlyle neither accuses or excuses the French Revolution; he attempts to write about an event and phenomena that even today historians are still debating.
When we look back over all the carnage and the tragic divulsions.. When the dead are all buried and time has bound and healed at least some of the injustices which took place.. When we add it all up and ask ourselves almost 200 years later what it all meant we are still no closer to a final answer than when Thomas Carlyle first took pen in hand, sat down, and began to write..the story of..The French Revolution.
.
The Sinners from Mitar
I don’t consider myself equal to the task of writing a review of Carlyle’s works simply because I consider him to be one of the greatest writers of his Age; second perhaps only to Edmund Burke. I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge that plumbing these depths is a challenge. However I will scribble a few notes here for anyone wishing to brave these waters and start off by admitting that for the layman and others such as myself, finishing the book from cover to cover can be a daunting task. However, if you set your sails aright, despite the obstacles, it can prove a most rewarding venture. Strenuous.. maybe- Arduous.. a little.. But well worth the effort. To be sure, the reader will encounter a vast array of names and places that will sound foreign to his ear; players and actors who have long since left the world stage. Despite time and history having buried many of these names beneath her proud waves these waters are still navigable

Alex de Tocqueville wrote that: “The American Revolution was caused by a mature and thoughtful taste for freedom. No disorderly passions drove it. On the contrary, it proceeded hand in hand with a love of order and legality”. Not so the French Revolution. It was sudden, violent and unforgiving. Tens of thousands of people lost their lives. And the way they were murdered (there is no other name for it) was particularly cruel, brutal and vicious. The bodies of victims were often mutilated and dismembered; heads stuck on the end of pikes and paraded through towns and cities. Hundreds of priests were tied up and put on boats; the boats then deliberately and purposely sunk; all drowned- there were no survivors (Pg. 691). The Tannery in Meudon where the flaying, butchering and skinning of human corpses (both men and woman) took place (Pg. 712) for making breeches, pants, and clothing. Gruesome and horrifically evil, but true. Apparently, the Nazis weren’t first to find new uses for human skin. And (if you have the stomach for it) you can do an internet search on Princess de Lamballe. The actual details of her murder were so unspeakable that Carlyle refused to commit them to writing.
Like Arjuna who looked with unshielded eyes into the mouth of Krishna before the battle of Kurukshetra and saw worlds and universes unfold before him; so too Carlyle looks into the maw of the French Revolution. Carlyle takes up the challenge by asking what exactly the French Revolution was all about? What did it all mean? What did it signify? How is it to be interpreted? Do we even have (he asks) the tools to dare attempt an interpretation? In the end, Carlyle neither accuses or excuses the French Revolution; he attempts to write about an event and phenomena that even today historians are still debating.
When we look back over all the carnage and the tragic divulsions.. When the dead are all buried and time has bound and healed at least some of the injustices which took place.. When we add it all up and ask ourselves almost 200 years later what it all meant we are still no closer to a final answer than when Thomas Carlyle first took pen in hand, sat down, and began to write..the story of..The French Revolution.
.