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Floating on a Malayan Breeze: Travels in Malaysia and Singapore epub download

by Sudhir Thomas Vadaketh


What happens after a country splits apart? Forty-seven years ago Singapore separated from Malaysia. Since then, the two countries have developed along their own paths. Malaysia has given preference to the majority Malay Muslims -- the bumiputera, or sons of the soil. Singapore, meanwhile, has tried to build a meritocracy -- ostensibly colour-blind, yet more encouraging perhaps to some Singaporeans than to others. How have these policies affected ordinary people? How do these two divergent nations now see each other and the world around them? Seeking answers to these questions, two Singaporeans set off to cycle around Peninsular Malaysia, armed with a tent, two pairs of clothes and a daily budget of three US dollars each. They spent 30 days on the road, cycling through every Malaysian state, and chatting with hundreds of Malaysians. Not satisfied, they then went on to interview many more people in Malaysia and Singapore. What they found are two countries that have developed economically but are still struggling to find their souls.

Floating on a Malayan Breeze: Travels in Malaysia and Singapore epub download

ISBN13: 978-9888139316

ISBN: 9888139312

Author: Sudhir Thomas Vadaketh

Category: History

Subcategory: Asia

Language: English

Publisher: Hong Kong University Press (October 1, 2012)

Pages: 312 pages

ePUB size: 1813 kb

FB2 size: 1619 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 472

Other Formats: lit azw lrf mbr

Related to Floating on a Malayan Breeze: Travels in Malaysia and Singapore ePub books

inform
Not as much travelogue as I would have hoped but a well organized comparison and contrast between Malaysia and Singapore. The author has a slight liberal slant which provides an alternative view in addition to the comparisons.
inform
Not as much travelogue as I would have hoped but a well organized comparison and contrast between Malaysia and Singapore. The author has a slight liberal slant which provides an alternative view in addition to the comparisons.
OCARO
Good read. Gives you a good insight into how Singapore and Malaysia have changed socially and politically in such a short period of time. I read this book because I was about to holiday in Singapore and I'm very glad I read it before I went because it gave me such a good insight into the political history of Singapore and how it has become the great city it is today.
OCARO
Good read. Gives you a good insight into how Singapore and Malaysia have changed socially and politically in such a short period of time. I read this book because I was about to holiday in Singapore and I'm very glad I read it before I went because it gave me such a good insight into the political history of Singapore and how it has become the great city it is today.
Modimeena
I bought this book to learn a lot more about both countries. I wouldn't say this book fulfilled that aspiration that much - but it was a good read and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was a good starter if you are interested in learning more about Singapore and the culture.
Modimeena
I bought this book to learn a lot more about both countries. I wouldn't say this book fulfilled that aspiration that much - but it was a good read and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was a good starter if you are interested in learning more about Singapore and the culture.
Mautaxe
As a Malaysian, I agree with most of the points that the writer has made. Two years ago I was studying Malaysian history and we learnt briefly about Singapore's split from Malaysia. This got me thinking about Singapore and how it must've been like for them since independence and their rocket-speed rise to development. This book has been a good read and I can say that it has helped me understand better the view of my Singaporean neighbors. I find it a pity that Malaya(although it was way before my time) did not work out; it would've been an interesting place to live in(maybe somewhat like Hong Kong and China?). Every time I visit Singapore, I feel proud of her. To be living next to a country that is 'smart, efficient and clean', I admire these virtues and I admire Singapore. She is one that Malaysia should emulate and strive to be like but of course, in her very own... Malaysian way. :)
Mautaxe
As a Malaysian, I agree with most of the points that the writer has made. Two years ago I was studying Malaysian history and we learnt briefly about Singapore's split from Malaysia. This got me thinking about Singapore and how it must've been like for them since independence and their rocket-speed rise to development. This book has been a good read and I can say that it has helped me understand better the view of my Singaporean neighbors. I find it a pity that Malaya(although it was way before my time) did not work out; it would've been an interesting place to live in(maybe somewhat like Hong Kong and China?). Every time I visit Singapore, I feel proud of her. To be living next to a country that is 'smart, efficient and clean', I admire these virtues and I admire Singapore. She is one that Malaysia should emulate and strive to be like but of course, in her very own... Malaysian way. :)
Faehn
This is a remarkable book, and in many ways. It is also extremely well written.

It is not, as the sub-title suggests, a travel dialogue, a book about a cycle trip around south-east Asia. It is not a travel book at all. Nor is it entirely about the relationship between two small countries, barely on most people's radars. Singapore and peninsular Malaysia only contain 25m people after all, the same as some very big cities. And it is not purely about what happens when two parts of one country, as they once were, divide.

It is about many of the challenges facing modern democratic and not-so-democratic governments around the world. Should they support the less well-off in their societies, or should "the market" choose the winners and losers? Should neighbours be viewed as potential partners or possible rivals? What does democracy actually mean today? How can multi-cultural and multi-religious communities be made to work? And, most critically, what is social well-being exactly, and how should it be measured?

Remarkably, Sudhir tackles these complex issues from his vantage point in Singapore, where almost any sort of debate like this is deeply unwelcome. Mr Lee, the country's founding father, and his family have already told everyone the answers, you see.

And yet Sudhir does tackle them, and with great power, aiming his lance with startling precision and little compromise. He dances carefully across the fully laden table and doesn't break a thing.

The book is not without a few small niggles. It is sometimes hard to remember which chapter is which. There are rather too many distracting untranslated Malay words. Readers will find it useful to know a bit about these two countries, and their sometimes obscure world-view.

But those are minor quibbles. Floating on a Malayan Breeze is a delight of a book, providing pleasure for the soul and sustenance for the mind in equal measure.
Faehn
This is a remarkable book, and in many ways. It is also extremely well written.

It is not, as the sub-title suggests, a travel dialogue, a book about a cycle trip around south-east Asia. It is not a travel book at all. Nor is it entirely about the relationship between two small countries, barely on most people's radars. Singapore and peninsular Malaysia only contain 25m people after all, the same as some very big cities. And it is not purely about what happens when two parts of one country, as they once were, divide.

It is about many of the challenges facing modern democratic and not-so-democratic governments around the world. Should they support the less well-off in their societies, or should "the market" choose the winners and losers? Should neighbours be viewed as potential partners or possible rivals? What does democracy actually mean today? How can multi-cultural and multi-religious communities be made to work? And, most critically, what is social well-being exactly, and how should it be measured?

Remarkably, Sudhir tackles these complex issues from his vantage point in Singapore, where almost any sort of debate like this is deeply unwelcome. Mr Lee, the country's founding father, and his family have already told everyone the answers, you see.

And yet Sudhir does tackle them, and with great power, aiming his lance with startling precision and little compromise. He dances carefully across the fully laden table and doesn't break a thing.

The book is not without a few small niggles. It is sometimes hard to remember which chapter is which. There are rather too many distracting untranslated Malay words. Readers will find it useful to know a bit about these two countries, and their sometimes obscure world-view.

But those are minor quibbles. Floating on a Malayan Breeze is a delight of a book, providing pleasure for the soul and sustenance for the mind in equal measure.
Tam
Don't be deceived by the framing of this book as a travelogue, it is far more sophisticated than that. I felt that I was reading an exposé on my Malaysian and Singaporean prejudices. If you're Singaporean, you will come out of reading this book with a new found respect for Malaysia, and I think it works the other way around too. As a "young" Singaporean who didn't experience Malaya before the separation and grew up hearing how different Malaysia was to us, I enjoyed reading how much in common I have with my neighbours, and have a new found hope for Malaysia's democratic process, which in some ways feels like they're moving ahead of Singapore.
If you're not Malayan (Malaysian or Singaporean) this is a great book to understand the political, social and cultural narratives of our two countries. The author makes some pretty bold criticisms of both countries, and he manages not to offend either too badly.
All in all, great writing and an easy book to get through!
Tam
Don't be deceived by the framing of this book as a travelogue, it is far more sophisticated than that. I felt that I was reading an exposé on my Malaysian and Singaporean prejudices. If you're Singaporean, you will come out of reading this book with a new found respect for Malaysia, and I think it works the other way around too. As a "young" Singaporean who didn't experience Malaya before the separation and grew up hearing how different Malaysia was to us, I enjoyed reading how much in common I have with my neighbours, and have a new found hope for Malaysia's democratic process, which in some ways feels like they're moving ahead of Singapore.
If you're not Malayan (Malaysian or Singaporean) this is a great book to understand the political, social and cultural narratives of our two countries. The author makes some pretty bold criticisms of both countries, and he manages not to offend either too badly.
All in all, great writing and an easy book to get through!
BlackBerry
A deeply involved and highly informative introduction into the multidimensional relationship between Malaysia and Singapore. The author approaches the book as an analysis of this relationship through a personal set of travels making this an interesting and very educational read.
BlackBerry
A deeply involved and highly informative introduction into the multidimensional relationship between Malaysia and Singapore. The author approaches the book as an analysis of this relationship through a personal set of travels making this an interesting and very educational read.
This is a travelogue cum political/social discourse. An interesting perspective of the striking similarities and stark differences between Malaysia and Singapore, as well as an understanding of how ideologies and policies of the past have helped shaped the present. It's well-written and told in an intriguing manner, with a healthy dose of humour - expect an honest take on what are often taboo subjects. As a Singaporean, I had a somewhat myopic view of Malaysia, and it was fascinating to see just how much I had glazed over.
This is a travelogue cum political/social discourse. An interesting perspective of the striking similarities and stark differences between Malaysia and Singapore, as well as an understanding of how ideologies and policies of the past have helped shaped the present. It's well-written and told in an intriguing manner, with a healthy dose of humour - expect an honest take on what are often taboo subjects. As a Singaporean, I had a somewhat myopic view of Malaysia, and it was fascinating to see just how much I had glazed over.