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Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History epub download

by David Drummond,S. C. Gwynne


Someone in a thread mentioned the book "Empire of the Summer Moon," which was a big bestseller published in 2010.

Gwynne is the author of Hymns of the Republic and the New York Times bestsellers Rebel Yell and Empire of the Summer Moon, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Someone in a thread mentioned the book "Empire of the Summer Moon," which was a big bestseller published in 2010. Unfortunately, a lot of well-meaning people have read this book without realizing this is little more than racist drivel under the facade of scholarship.

What the book does is prove that the Comanche were, without a doubt, the most powerful tribe in American history. Overall, the book will give the average reader insight into the frontier they did not possess before reading it. But this is not a new idea, as most historians would agree that the Comanche dwarfed all other horse tribes in the West in terms of accumulated wealth- an idea that, before the white man, was unknown to the Comanche.

Of those, the most remote, primitive, and irredeemably hostile were a band of Comanches known as the Quahadis. Like all Plains Indians, they were nomadic. They hunted primarily the southernmost part of the high plains, a place known to the Spanish, who had been abjectly driven from it, as Comancheria. The Llano Estacado, located within Comancheria, was a dead-flat tableland larger than New England and rising, in its highest elevations, to more than five thousand feet. For Europeans, the land was like a bad hallucination.

Электронная книга "Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History", S. C. Gwynne

Электронная книга "Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History", S. Gwynne. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches

The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode.

A memorable examination of the longest and most brutal of all the wars between European settlers and a single Indian tribe. Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America, by Eliza Griswold (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

A memorable examination of the longest and most brutal of all the wars between European settlers and a single Indian tribe. Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America, by Eliza Griswold (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). A classic American story, grippingly told, of an Appalachian family struggling to retain its middle class status in the shadow of destruction wreaked by corporate fracking. Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America, by James Forman Jr. (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

the clan in May of 1836

the clan in May of 1836. Like many other members of the Parker clan, James was a colorful figure. But he was much more than that. He was one of the most outrageous, extreme, obsessive, ambitious, violent, dishonest, morally compromised, reckless, and daring characters ever to stake a claim on the early Texas frontier.

Their story - and the saga of the powerful American Indian tribe - is told by . Hulton Archive/Getty Images. Gwynne in his book, Empire of the Summer Moon. This story was originally broadcast on June 23, 2010. In 1836, a 9-year-old pioneer girl named Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped during a Comanche raid in North Texas. She was strapped onto the back of a horse and taken north, back into the Plains where the powerful American Indian tribe lived.

Mobile version (beta). If possible, download the file in its original format. Gwynne S C. Download (epub, 787 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original.

The Gruesome History of the Comanche Tribe w/. Ride The Blues - Full length Film/Docu-Concert - Jeremiah Johnson Band - Продолжительность: 1:19:51 Jeremiah Johnson Band Recommended for you. 1:19:51. Desert Seas - Продолжительность: 46:08 Aramco Recommended for you.

Few people realize that the Comanche Indians were the greatest warring tribe in American history. Their forty-year battle with settlers held up the development of the new nation. Empire of the Summer Moon tells of the rise and fall of this fierce, powerful, and proud tribe, and begins in 1836 with the kidnapping of a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower blue eyes named Cynthia Ann Parker. She grew to love her captors and eventually became famous as the "White Squaw." She married a powerful Comanche chief, and their son, Quanah, became a warrior who was never defeated and whose bravery and military brilliance in the Texas panhandle made him a legend as one of the greatest of the Plains Indian chiefs.In this vivid piece of writing, S. C. Gwynne describes in sometimes brutal detail the savagery of both whites and Comanches and, despite the distance of time, demonstrates how truly shocking these events were, juxtaposed against the haunting story of an unforgettable figure of a woman caught between two worlds.

Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History epub download

ISBN13: 978-1400116553

ISBN: 1400116554

Author: David Drummond,S. C. Gwynne

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Tantor Audio; Unabridged CD edition (May 25, 2010)

ePUB size: 1555 kb

FB2 size: 1248 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 788

Other Formats: rtf lrf mbr lit

Related to Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History ePub books

Kiutondyl
We live in Oklahoma - the middle of modern day Comanche County. My best friend growing up was the great-granddaughter of Chief Quannah Parker. She was even named after Cynthia Ann Parker. She has been my friend for over 60+ years. Therefore, I knew some of the history of the Comanche way of life, but from their side. I still cherish those memories of the stories told to me by her Grandmother (which was really her great-aunt, but called Grandmother by Comanche culture). She told of how afraid of the soldiers they were as children on the reservation near Fort Sill. I was a child hearing these stories, not really understanding... My family (white settlers) had settled in Oklahoma Territory from the Llano, Texas area before the turn of the century. They had lived thru the battles and loss of lives. Some went on to Arizona, but that's another story.
EMPIRE OF THE SUMMER MOON really awakened some of those memories - but from both sides. It was a horrible time for the settlers and the Indians! I have read many books on the subject, but this was the BEST, most accurate account, from both sides. It gives true documentation of events as they happened. We have given this book to so many family members and friends. A few weeks ago, we gave it to a Comanche friend. He said he learned so much about his people from this book. We HIGHLY recommend this book to anyone wanting to know the true history of the west from both sides.
Kiutondyl
We live in Oklahoma - the middle of modern day Comanche County. My best friend growing up was the great-granddaughter of Chief Quannah Parker. She was even named after Cynthia Ann Parker. She has been my friend for over 60+ years. Therefore, I knew some of the history of the Comanche way of life, but from their side. I still cherish those memories of the stories told to me by her Grandmother (which was really her great-aunt, but called Grandmother by Comanche culture). She told of how afraid of the soldiers they were as children on the reservation near Fort Sill. I was a child hearing these stories, not really understanding... My family (white settlers) had settled in Oklahoma Territory from the Llano, Texas area before the turn of the century. They had lived thru the battles and loss of lives. Some went on to Arizona, but that's another story.
EMPIRE OF THE SUMMER MOON really awakened some of those memories - but from both sides. It was a horrible time for the settlers and the Indians! I have read many books on the subject, but this was the BEST, most accurate account, from both sides. It gives true documentation of events as they happened. We have given this book to so many family members and friends. A few weeks ago, we gave it to a Comanche friend. He said he learned so much about his people from this book. We HIGHLY recommend this book to anyone wanting to know the true history of the west from both sides.
Duzshura
My only complaint about this book is redundancy. That said, I couldn't put this down. It invaded my thoughts and dreams. There is such a deep sadness about this chapter if American History and this book just crystallized the impossible situation.

I live in the area of Texas and Oklahoma covered in the book. I have family papers used by relatives three generations ago to establish Indian connections for the purpose of personal gain. I have visited the forts and parks, missions, and roadside historical signs related to this time period. This book helped me put the pieces together.

If you think one group is all bad and the other all good, you will hate this book. If you want to take a hard look at what happens when cultures clash, this book tackles the subject in a compelling and interesting way.
Duzshura
My only complaint about this book is redundancy. That said, I couldn't put this down. It invaded my thoughts and dreams. There is such a deep sadness about this chapter if American History and this book just crystallized the impossible situation.

I live in the area of Texas and Oklahoma covered in the book. I have family papers used by relatives three generations ago to establish Indian connections for the purpose of personal gain. I have visited the forts and parks, missions, and roadside historical signs related to this time period. This book helped me put the pieces together.

If you think one group is all bad and the other all good, you will hate this book. If you want to take a hard look at what happens when cultures clash, this book tackles the subject in a compelling and interesting way.
Usaxma
I normally get all books from the library, which is where I first got this one. In the past 15 years I have actually bought to keep in my small "library" 2 books--Carl Sagan's "The Demon Haunted World," & this one. Published in 2010, it is the only book I've ever found that tells the history of American expansion into the west without a strong bias toward whites, and with phenomenal documentation (nearly a quarter of the volume is a listing of citations).
The fact that for over 40 years I've lived in the middle of the area primarily concerned makes it more personal to me, as well as that one of my grandmothers was born in "Indian Territory" (as Oklahoma was called at first), & my mother told of some of her childhood memories of meeting Indians in her home town as a young girl, all add to my own interest. But the main attraction is the unbiased telling of the story, "no punches pulled." The author doesn't shy away from the details of the brutallity on both sides, so it can be disturbing at times; but it also shows the admirable aspects of both sides.
There is no question that Quanah was a truly great leader, but you'll have to read the whole story to understand just how great.
Usaxma
I normally get all books from the library, which is where I first got this one. In the past 15 years I have actually bought to keep in my small "library" 2 books--Carl Sagan's "The Demon Haunted World," & this one. Published in 2010, it is the only book I've ever found that tells the history of American expansion into the west without a strong bias toward whites, and with phenomenal documentation (nearly a quarter of the volume is a listing of citations).
The fact that for over 40 years I've lived in the middle of the area primarily concerned makes it more personal to me, as well as that one of my grandmothers was born in "Indian Territory" (as Oklahoma was called at first), & my mother told of some of her childhood memories of meeting Indians in her home town as a young girl, all add to my own interest. But the main attraction is the unbiased telling of the story, "no punches pulled." The author doesn't shy away from the details of the brutallity on both sides, so it can be disturbing at times; but it also shows the admirable aspects of both sides.
There is no question that Quanah was a truly great leader, but you'll have to read the whole story to understand just how great.
Brol
After finishing this book, by sheer coincidence I came across Dances with Wolves as I was cruising channels. When you put the movie (about the Sioux) next to the this book - about the Comanches - you begin to realize how good it truly is and how substance it has. You might expect any story about Indians clashing with whites to leave you rooting hopelessly for the natives, but this account doesn't have that effect. The author wants you to admire the "Lords of the Plains", but he makes clear how brutal and ruthless they could be to whites and Indians alike.

The Comanches were a ferocious and highly skilled band of warriors that were only defeated because of the better guns the whites had. I never imagined a tribe of 40,000 could have so thoroughly dominated such a large swath of land for hundreds of years. There was no "trail of tears" for these guys. So unflinching is the book that at times I could feel the terror I'm sure existed in the heart of every white that dared to settle near Comancheria. You're left wondering why anyone would choose to risk life and scalp - your own and your children's - to live on the barren plains of northwest Texas. That's an important question that the book leaves unanswered.

If you want to learn about cowboys and Indians this book is essential. I read Blood and Thunder and this book tells a very different story. Both are excellent but if you read only about the Navajos you don't come close to getting a full picture of this, our own Hundred Years' War.
Brol
After finishing this book, by sheer coincidence I came across Dances with Wolves as I was cruising channels. When you put the movie (about the Sioux) next to the this book - about the Comanches - you begin to realize how good it truly is and how substance it has. You might expect any story about Indians clashing with whites to leave you rooting hopelessly for the natives, but this account doesn't have that effect. The author wants you to admire the "Lords of the Plains", but he makes clear how brutal and ruthless they could be to whites and Indians alike.

The Comanches were a ferocious and highly skilled band of warriors that were only defeated because of the better guns the whites had. I never imagined a tribe of 40,000 could have so thoroughly dominated such a large swath of land for hundreds of years. There was no "trail of tears" for these guys. So unflinching is the book that at times I could feel the terror I'm sure existed in the heart of every white that dared to settle near Comancheria. You're left wondering why anyone would choose to risk life and scalp - your own and your children's - to live on the barren plains of northwest Texas. That's an important question that the book leaves unanswered.

If you want to learn about cowboys and Indians this book is essential. I read Blood and Thunder and this book tells a very different story. Both are excellent but if you read only about the Navajos you don't come close to getting a full picture of this, our own Hundred Years' War.
Lyrtois
One of my favorite books this year and an interesting account of an often forgotten person. I read the novel just before my trip to Palo Duro Canyon State Park near Canyon, Texas. History came alive as I relived the battles while hiking along the canyon and visiting the highly acclaimed Panhandle-Plains Museum in Canyon, Texas. Quanah Parker is an interesting, complex historical figure whose journey from feared Comanche warrior to respected politician is very well presented here.
Lyrtois
One of my favorite books this year and an interesting account of an often forgotten person. I read the novel just before my trip to Palo Duro Canyon State Park near Canyon, Texas. History came alive as I relived the battles while hiking along the canyon and visiting the highly acclaimed Panhandle-Plains Museum in Canyon, Texas. Quanah Parker is an interesting, complex historical figure whose journey from feared Comanche warrior to respected politician is very well presented here.