» » Four Years In Rebel Capitals: An Inside View Of Life In The Southern Confederacy From Birth To Death.

Four Years In Rebel Capitals: An Inside View Of Life In The Southern Confederacy From Birth To Death. epub download

by Thomas Cooper Deleon


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com your best source for free audio books. These, if unsettled by dire arbitrament of the sword, must be left to Time and his best coadjutor, "sober second thought.

From original notes, collated in the years 1861 to 1865, By. T. C. DeLeon, MOBILE, ALA. From original notes, collated in the years 1861 to 1865, By. The gossip printing company.

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De Leon, T. (Thomas Cooper), 1839-1914, Confederate States of America, Southern States - Description and travel, United States - History Civil War, 1861-1865 Personal . (Thomas Cooper), 1839-1914, Confederate States of America, Southern States - Description and travel, United States - History Civil War, 1861-1865 Personal narratives, Confederate. Mobile, Ala. : Gossip Print Co. Collection. civilwardocuments; americana.

Fortunate, Indeed, Is The Reader Who Takes Up A Volume Without Preface; Of Which The Persons Are Left To Enact Their Own Drama And The Author Does Not Come Before The Curtain, Like The Chorus Of Greek Tragedy, To Speak For Them. But, In printing the. But, In printing the Pages That Follow, It May Seem Needful To Ask That They Be Taken For What They Are; Simple Sketches Of The Inner Life Of "Rebeldom"-Behind Its Chinese Wall Of Wood And Steel-During those Unexampled four Years Of Its Existence.

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. These, if unsettled by dire arbitrament of the sword, must be left to Time and his best coadjutor, sober second-thought. Campaigns and battles have already surfeited most readers; and their details-usually so incorrectly stated by the inexpert-have little to do with a relation of things within the Confederacy, as they then appeared to the masses of her people.

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Thomas Cooper De Leon01 January 1890. Gossip printing Company. From Original Notes, Collated in the Years 1861 to 1865.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Four Years In Rebel Capitals: An Inside View Of Life In The Southern Confederacy From Birth To Death. epub download

ISBN13: 978-1428611542

ISBN: 1428611541

Author: Thomas Cooper Deleon

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (May 26, 2006)

Pages: 420 pages

ePUB size: 1366 kb

FB2 size: 1474 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 885

Other Formats: azw txt lrf mobi

Related to Four Years In Rebel Capitals: An Inside View Of Life In The Southern Confederacy From Birth To Death. ePub books

Braendo
Having read Porter's book on campaigning with Grant, I found the first person narrative to be enjoyable, so I thought I would read this book to get a better sense of how the South viewed the war. Weeeelll, I got a bit of that. However, DeLeon was a true blue Lost Cause believer. Which would be alright, since that is a fact of the rebellion's after-effect if he was not such a dandy who wrote a streak of purple prose at the drop of a hat. There are exclamation points everywhere ! and every Southern man ! is noble!, brave!, a laughing soul! and every Southern woman! would give the last crumb in her cupboard! and the shaw on her shoulder! to every passing rebel soldier!

It reads like a teenage girl writing about her first love, "the most perfect love, never before seen and never to be matched throughout eternity!" Change "perfect love" to "knightly southron" and you pretty much have DeLeon's style summed up.

Take his description of Johston arriving in the west theater to take command, he is described as a "patriot soldier and true knight", a "worthy son of noble sires" who went west to "clear the Augean Stables of the West; and the God-speed of his own state - swelled into hearty chorus by the voice of the country - followed him on his knightly errand!"

So, as can be seen, DeLeon tries to mythologize the rebel soldiers, they were all "knights", "sons of noble sires", new-age Hercules and blessed of God, the new "chosen people". In small doses, that is okay; but page after page after page of which often you sense he was making it up to "prove" his point left me uncertain what I should believe to be true.

An example of his too often fabrication. DeLeon tells the story of a black maid recently freed who remains with her former mistress. She desires to learn to read and write, something the South prevented slaves from doing to keep them uninformed and debased. While at the school , the Northern white teacher lady states to the blacks that they need not be shy about their learning, they are now the equal of the whites. The maid asks if that means she is the equal of her mistress. When told "yes", she promptly gets up and states she is leaving the school because her mistress would never deem to associate with "white trash" such as the Northern teacher and, so, as she is the equal of her mistress, she now respects herself too much to also associate with such "white trash".

DeLeon portrays the above of a factual occurrence. However, it clearly is not. It makes no sense. A black woman's desire to become literate is thrown aside by her because she want to pathetically emulate the very woman who prevented her literacy in the first place. Come on!

Another example, a bit shorter. DeLeon tells of his rich buddies "nobly" eating stale camp food with a playful gusto early in the war. He finds this wondrous and yet another example of Southern specialness. Concluding by stating that such panache was a boon to the more common soldier, who admired the pluck of these "best sons of the South".

Come on! You are a grunt soldier, eating bland food like you did before the war since you are not particularly rich. Suddenly, a rich man's son joins the squad and "nobly" eats the same bland food and he and his friends thereafter "playfully" joke about how he is willingly debasing himself by eating such garbage for the Cause. You are telling me that this elitist attitude would be inspiring to you?!? Well, DeLeon thinks it was. Of course, since most of the book is just his opinion and not particularly a statement of particular fact it should not surprise me that this story is told as "fact" since he clearly believed he and his friends were better than everyone else and particularly the Northern who didn't care to be sassy or "clever" like he and his friends.

Being sassy was apparently a very Southern thing. DeLeon tells of the women left to fend for themselves once Richmond fell. He portrays them as so deep in "mourning" for the death of the Southern cause that they were not even inspired to be sassy, "there was no ostentation of disdain for their conquerors - no assumption of horror if they passed a group of Federals - no affected brushing of the skirt from the contact with the blue". Note the "no assumption" and "no affected" which clearly state that a southern lady was expected to put on an act of being "horrified" by any physical contact with a Federal soldier to the point that she should scrunch up her face if one was nearby. It all reads like a bad case of high schoolitis, those adults who enjoyed being "queen" or "king" of the school and, so, need to put on airs or make faces to let everyone know how important they are and how their "opinion matters". It is so childish, yet DeLeon clearly feels this acting is proper and part of what made the Southron "knightly" and "special". Whatever! More like, what made the Southron "spoiled" and "bratty".

In a perverse way, it was fun to read how DeLeon continually exaggerated the casualties for the North and unreported those for the South. Heck, even battles which technically were lost by the South were reported as "noble victories". And, boy, did DeLeon haaaate U.S. Grant. He takes every opportunity to portray him as a bumbler who apparently lucked his way to ten or so victories. He even claims that every Northern general believed Grant's Vicksburg Campaign was a blunder but he "lucked out" by fighting against weak Southern generals. (Now, ironically, one of the "weak" generals would have been Johnston, the very general who DeLeon lauds throughout the South's defense against Sherman. Not quiet sure how a general can be "weak" when facing Grant but a skillful general when facing Sherman without it appearing that Grant outgeneraled him). Repeatedly, DeLeon states as fact that Grant lost 7 men to each man lost by Lee and simply bleed northern men to "win" against Lee. In reality, Grant lost 3 men for every 2 men lost by Lee, so it was 1.5 times and not 7 times as alleged. Further, since Lee kept fortifying and daring Grant to charge his defenses rather than meet Grant in an open battle, it would be expected that Grant would lose 1.5 to 2.5 men for every man lost by Lee since soldiers charging fortifications must expose themselves while soldiers in such forts are protected.

DeLeon did have some interesting things to say, particularly about the Northern navy and its blockade being a larger part of the North's victory than is commonly stated - mainly because battles are exciting reading while a naval blockade is not.

In the end, DeLeon unintentionally portrays the South as naive and overly full of self-love. It believed "Cotton was King" and falsely believed the entire Northern economy directly tied to its cotton. It believed European nations, who bought its cotton could not do with that produce and so would eagerly ignore the North's blockades. It believed that one rebel was equal to 10 Yankees and so its significantly lower population could prevail. It believed that its own economy which was entirely dependent on cotton and, otherwise, had limited factories or industries was sufficient to counter the North's much more diverse economy which easily started turning out a massive amount of weaponry and, in fact, invested improved guns which enhanced an already larger body of men. None of these facts was hidden before the war, the South just ignored them because it was more "noble" to get riled up and claim secession than to figure out if secession could be sustained.

It is a tedious read, however, there are nuggets of fact buried in the pages of DeLeon's opinion and fantasizing masquerading as reportage. So, if you have interest in a Southron's view (DeLeon prefers "southron" so I have honored that preference) then give it a read. Otherwise, there are better and certainly more enjoyable reads than his book.
Braendo
Having read Porter's book on campaigning with Grant, I found the first person narrative to be enjoyable, so I thought I would read this book to get a better sense of how the South viewed the war. Weeeelll, I got a bit of that. However, DeLeon was a true blue Lost Cause believer. Which would be alright, since that is a fact of the rebellion's after-effect if he was not such a dandy who wrote a streak of purple prose at the drop of a hat. There are exclamation points everywhere ! and every Southern man ! is noble!, brave!, a laughing soul! and every Southern woman! would give the last crumb in her cupboard! and the shaw on her shoulder! to every passing rebel soldier!

It reads like a teenage girl writing about her first love, "the most perfect love, never before seen and never to be matched throughout eternity!" Change "perfect love" to "knightly southron" and you pretty much have DeLeon's style summed up.

Take his description of Johston arriving in the west theater to take command, he is described as a "patriot soldier and true knight", a "worthy son of noble sires" who went west to "clear the Augean Stables of the West; and the God-speed of his own state - swelled into hearty chorus by the voice of the country - followed him on his knightly errand!"

So, as can be seen, DeLeon tries to mythologize the rebel soldiers, they were all "knights", "sons of noble sires", new-age Hercules and blessed of God, the new "chosen people". In small doses, that is okay; but page after page after page of which often you sense he was making it up to "prove" his point left me uncertain what I should believe to be true.

An example of his too often fabrication. DeLeon tells the story of a black maid recently freed who remains with her former mistress. She desires to learn to read and write, something the South prevented slaves from doing to keep them uninformed and debased. While at the school , the Northern white teacher lady states to the blacks that they need not be shy about their learning, they are now the equal of the whites. The maid asks if that means she is the equal of her mistress. When told "yes", she promptly gets up and states she is leaving the school because her mistress would never deem to associate with "white trash" such as the Northern teacher and, so, as she is the equal of her mistress, she now respects herself too much to also associate with such "white trash".

DeLeon portrays the above of a factual occurrence. However, it clearly is not. It makes no sense. A black woman's desire to become literate is thrown aside by her because she want to pathetically emulate the very woman who prevented her literacy in the first place. Come on!

Another example, a bit shorter. DeLeon tells of his rich buddies "nobly" eating stale camp food with a playful gusto early in the war. He finds this wondrous and yet another example of Southern specialness. Concluding by stating that such panache was a boon to the more common soldier, who admired the pluck of these "best sons of the South".

Come on! You are a grunt soldier, eating bland food like you did before the war since you are not particularly rich. Suddenly, a rich man's son joins the squad and "nobly" eats the same bland food and he and his friends thereafter "playfully" joke about how he is willingly debasing himself by eating such garbage for the Cause. You are telling me that this elitist attitude would be inspiring to you?!? Well, DeLeon thinks it was. Of course, since most of the book is just his opinion and not particularly a statement of particular fact it should not surprise me that this story is told as "fact" since he clearly believed he and his friends were better than everyone else and particularly the Northern who didn't care to be sassy or "clever" like he and his friends.

Being sassy was apparently a very Southern thing. DeLeon tells of the women left to fend for themselves once Richmond fell. He portrays them as so deep in "mourning" for the death of the Southern cause that they were not even inspired to be sassy, "there was no ostentation of disdain for their conquerors - no assumption of horror if they passed a group of Federals - no affected brushing of the skirt from the contact with the blue". Note the "no assumption" and "no affected" which clearly state that a southern lady was expected to put on an act of being "horrified" by any physical contact with a Federal soldier to the point that she should scrunch up her face if one was nearby. It all reads like a bad case of high schoolitis, those adults who enjoyed being "queen" or "king" of the school and, so, need to put on airs or make faces to let everyone know how important they are and how their "opinion matters". It is so childish, yet DeLeon clearly feels this acting is proper and part of what made the Southron "knightly" and "special". Whatever! More like, what made the Southron "spoiled" and "bratty".

In a perverse way, it was fun to read how DeLeon continually exaggerated the casualties for the North and unreported those for the South. Heck, even battles which technically were lost by the South were reported as "noble victories". And, boy, did DeLeon haaaate U.S. Grant. He takes every opportunity to portray him as a bumbler who apparently lucked his way to ten or so victories. He even claims that every Northern general believed Grant's Vicksburg Campaign was a blunder but he "lucked out" by fighting against weak Southern generals. (Now, ironically, one of the "weak" generals would have been Johnston, the very general who DeLeon lauds throughout the South's defense against Sherman. Not quiet sure how a general can be "weak" when facing Grant but a skillful general when facing Sherman without it appearing that Grant outgeneraled him). Repeatedly, DeLeon states as fact that Grant lost 7 men to each man lost by Lee and simply bleed northern men to "win" against Lee. In reality, Grant lost 3 men for every 2 men lost by Lee, so it was 1.5 times and not 7 times as alleged. Further, since Lee kept fortifying and daring Grant to charge his defenses rather than meet Grant in an open battle, it would be expected that Grant would lose 1.5 to 2.5 men for every man lost by Lee since soldiers charging fortifications must expose themselves while soldiers in such forts are protected.

DeLeon did have some interesting things to say, particularly about the Northern navy and its blockade being a larger part of the North's victory than is commonly stated - mainly because battles are exciting reading while a naval blockade is not.

In the end, DeLeon unintentionally portrays the South as naive and overly full of self-love. It believed "Cotton was King" and falsely believed the entire Northern economy directly tied to its cotton. It believed European nations, who bought its cotton could not do with that produce and so would eagerly ignore the North's blockades. It believed that one rebel was equal to 10 Yankees and so its significantly lower population could prevail. It believed that its own economy which was entirely dependent on cotton and, otherwise, had limited factories or industries was sufficient to counter the North's much more diverse economy which easily started turning out a massive amount of weaponry and, in fact, invested improved guns which enhanced an already larger body of men. None of these facts was hidden before the war, the South just ignored them because it was more "noble" to get riled up and claim secession than to figure out if secession could be sustained.

It is a tedious read, however, there are nuggets of fact buried in the pages of DeLeon's opinion and fantasizing masquerading as reportage. So, if you have interest in a Southron's view (DeLeon prefers "southron" so I have honored that preference) then give it a read. Otherwise, there are better and certainly more enjoyable reads than his book.
Zieryn
I needed this to complete my collection. I am delighted to have it.
Zieryn
I needed this to complete my collection. I am delighted to have it.
Uranneavo
This book is one of a set of 30 from Time-Life Books series Collectors Library of the Civil War. Time-Life Books published this as a book club in the 1980s. You received a book every other month. You could examine the book and buy it or send it back.

These books are reprints of the original books published soon after the Civil War ended. They sold for around $21.00 a copy excluding shipping and tax. The entire set of 30 can be purchased today with a little search of the internet. I purchased an entire set for $200. The books were unread and in pristine condition. None of the 30 has any sign of wear or use.

I highly recommend these books as it gives first hand accounts of activities leading up to, during and after the end of the war. I live in Texas and the book titled Three Months in the Southern States gives me a close look into what life was like.
Uranneavo
This book is one of a set of 30 from Time-Life Books series Collectors Library of the Civil War. Time-Life Books published this as a book club in the 1980s. You received a book every other month. You could examine the book and buy it or send it back.

These books are reprints of the original books published soon after the Civil War ended. They sold for around $21.00 a copy excluding shipping and tax. The entire set of 30 can be purchased today with a little search of the internet. I purchased an entire set for $200. The books were unread and in pristine condition. None of the 30 has any sign of wear or use.

I highly recommend these books as it gives first hand accounts of activities leading up to, during and after the end of the war. I live in Texas and the book titled Three Months in the Southern States gives me a close look into what life was like.