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Founding Myths: Stories That Hide Our Patriotic Past epub download

by Ray Raphael


Despite its flippant cover, Founding Myths is not light reading. Raphael does examine a few of the more recognized Founding stories, but he writes as if he is on a crusade, and before long he is delving deeply into the characters and motivations of the Founding Fathers themselves

Despite its flippant cover, Founding Myths is not light reading. Raphael does examine a few of the more recognized Founding stories, but he writes as if he is on a crusade, and before long he is delving deeply into the characters and motivations of the Founding Fathers themselves.

Ray Raphael in his book, Founding Myths, aims to tell the true patriotic history behind the stories told about the American Revolution.

This was a people’s revolution, with the pressure to declare independence coming from the masses. Ray Raphael in his book, Founding Myths, aims to tell the true patriotic history behind the stories told about the American Revolution. Investigating thirteen prominent stories surrounding the Revolutionary era, Raphael attempts to put the actual people and events in context of their time while demythologizing the past.

First published ten years ago, award-winning historian Ray Raphael’s Founding Myths has since established itself as a landmark of historical myth-busting. With Raphael’s trademark wit and flair, Founding Myths exposed the errors and inventions in America’s most cherished tales, from Paul Revere’s famous ride to Patrick Henry’s Liberty or Death speech.

First published ten years ago, award-winning historian Ray Raphael’s Founding Myths has since established itself as a. .

Author Ray Raphael is very interested in debunking myths that have been perpetuated in school history books. This book has some interesting stories. It does make you wonder what your teachers in school taught you. It is well footnoted. His analysis of historical events is supported through extensive notes. Raphael's political judgment of events and tendency to fixate on the subject diminishes his presentation. There are many golden nuggets found in the book. You just have to persevere through the wordiness to find them.

Raphael's books have been published in the United Kingdom and translated into German, Portuguese, and Korean.

With Marie Raphael) The Spirit of’74: How the American Revolution Began (The New Press, 2015). Raphael's books have been published in the United Kingdom and translated into German, Portuguese, and Korean.

With wit and flair, Founding Myths exposes the errors and inventions in thirteen of America’s most cherished tales, from Paul . Recently Viewed and Featured.

With wit and flair, Founding Myths exposes the errors and inventions in thirteen of America’s most cherished tales, from Paul Revere’s famous ride to Patrick.

The highly praised book in which cherished stories from American history are exposed as myths. Widely praised following its initial publication, Founding Myths is a page-turner created out of the stuff of American history primers. Reexamining thirteen well-known tales from the American struggle for independence, the book documents the errors and inventions that permeate these cherished national myths?myths that are often still taught in American history classes?in what Baltimore's City Paper calls a "debunking that does not disappoint.

While an author writes a story in solitude, it is not transformed into a book without the help of a veritable army of support.

So why do we talk about Valley Forge so much? Valley Forge was a turning point for the Continental army and for the United States. The boys and men who gutted out the months of cold and hunger turned into a professional fighting force there. While an author writes a story in solitude, it is not transformed into a book without the help of a veritable army of support. I shall try my best to salute all of those whom helped make Forge into the novel you are holding in your hands.

Much of what you thought you knew about American history is wrong. Our best-loved tales actually sell America short, Raphael says. This nation was founded not just by the handful of "founding fathers" we have come to admire, but also by the revolutionary activities of innumerable and nameless patriots who are not mentioned in textbooks. Why should only a select few get the credit? The collaborative spirit and effort of the American people is an important concept for children (and adults) to learn.

Founding Myths: Stories That Hide Our Patriotic Past epub download

ISBN13: 978-1567318869

ISBN: 156731886X

Author: Ray Raphael

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: MJF Books; First Edition edition (2004)

Pages: 331 pages

ePUB size: 1392 kb

FB2 size: 1445 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 641

Other Formats: docx doc lrf mbr

Related to Founding Myths: Stories That Hide Our Patriotic Past ePub books

Doriel
Loved this book! It was a fun read and very informative on many subjects. Some chapters are better than others, but don't let that discourage you from finishing it. Each chapter was it's own topic so it's great for picking up and putting down and picking up again later. Only complaint, my Dad and I are big history lovers (I actually am an adjunct history professor at a community college) and we debated certain parts of the book and how legitimate some of his arguments were. If you are looking at text books on a regular basis for your history (as many students are) then this is great for basically calling out a lot of the myths we see over and over again in textbooks. Therefore, I absolutely loved this book. My Dad on the other hand felt like it was insulting other history writers and saying they shouldn't focus on individuals as much as the idea of revolution and that it was of "the people" more than one person (This is mostly in reference to the Samuel Adams chapter I believe). There is an element that the author doesn't pull his shots, he says too many "historians" focus on the individual than how the American Revolution was a revolution of "the people." Me coming from a teaching background and looking at textbooks- I definitely agree. After all, who would you say is the leader of the women's movement today? or the Black Lives Matter movement? (I use these examples in my class) But if you are coming from reading books on John Adams, George Washington, and others, well of course those authors are going to emphasize what great contributions these individuals made to the American Revolution. Just some food for thought. Absolutely loved the book though and would definitely recommend to anyone trying to think about history and how it is presented, rather than just learn about it.
Doriel
Loved this book! It was a fun read and very informative on many subjects. Some chapters are better than others, but don't let that discourage you from finishing it. Each chapter was it's own topic so it's great for picking up and putting down and picking up again later. Only complaint, my Dad and I are big history lovers (I actually am an adjunct history professor at a community college) and we debated certain parts of the book and how legitimate some of his arguments were. If you are looking at text books on a regular basis for your history (as many students are) then this is great for basically calling out a lot of the myths we see over and over again in textbooks. Therefore, I absolutely loved this book. My Dad on the other hand felt like it was insulting other history writers and saying they shouldn't focus on individuals as much as the idea of revolution and that it was of "the people" more than one person (This is mostly in reference to the Samuel Adams chapter I believe). There is an element that the author doesn't pull his shots, he says too many "historians" focus on the individual than how the American Revolution was a revolution of "the people." Me coming from a teaching background and looking at textbooks- I definitely agree. After all, who would you say is the leader of the women's movement today? or the Black Lives Matter movement? (I use these examples in my class) But if you are coming from reading books on John Adams, George Washington, and others, well of course those authors are going to emphasize what great contributions these individuals made to the American Revolution. Just some food for thought. Absolutely loved the book though and would definitely recommend to anyone trying to think about history and how it is presented, rather than just learn about it.
Malodor
Compares 1st person accounts from the Revolutionary period to how our national mythos developed long after the war for independence was over. One finds that a lot of what we take for fact regarding US revolutionary heroes is really really manufactured to make the founding of our nation a better "story." Unfortunately, that "better story" loses much of the complexity and majesty of our nation's path to independence. This work will deepen anyone's understanding of what really led to independence.
Malodor
Compares 1st person accounts from the Revolutionary period to how our national mythos developed long after the war for independence was over. One finds that a lot of what we take for fact regarding US revolutionary heroes is really really manufactured to make the founding of our nation a better "story." Unfortunately, that "better story" loses much of the complexity and majesty of our nation's path to independence. This work will deepen anyone's understanding of what really led to independence.
Yozshujinn
the author seemed to be rambling on and often repeatedly addressed the same information. Actually reminded me of a high school paper where the student author needs to meet a page count so just throws in long sentences and fluff to get there.
Yozshujinn
the author seemed to be rambling on and often repeatedly addressed the same information. Actually reminded me of a high school paper where the student author needs to meet a page count so just throws in long sentences and fluff to get there.
Aloo
Very education, but dry and long winded sometimes. I learned a lot but often felt as if I were reading a text book. It felt like some points were hammered in too many times. It felt like I learned the point and wanted to move on to a new one but the "lesson" wasn't over. I gave higher stars than the review sounds like because I think the educational value outweighs the book shortcomings.
Aloo
Very education, but dry and long winded sometimes. I learned a lot but often felt as if I were reading a text book. It felt like some points were hammered in too many times. It felt like I learned the point and wanted to move on to a new one but the "lesson" wasn't over. I gave higher stars than the review sounds like because I think the educational value outweighs the book shortcomings.
Helo
Raphael is a historian in the Howard Zinn tradition: politically quite liberal, very readable, a fine story-teller. Here he debunks many people and events that live for us in cartoon-like mythology -- Paul Revere's ride, "Molly Pitcher" , Sam Adams, the battles of Lexington and Concord, and more -- and tells the real stories which are invariably more interesting. I'd also strongly recommend his "The First American Revolution". Historians make much of the failed Shays's Rebellion in 1786; this book tells the story of the more important and much more successful rebellion in Massachusetts in late 1774-early 1775.
Helo
Raphael is a historian in the Howard Zinn tradition: politically quite liberal, very readable, a fine story-teller. Here he debunks many people and events that live for us in cartoon-like mythology -- Paul Revere's ride, "Molly Pitcher" , Sam Adams, the battles of Lexington and Concord, and more -- and tells the real stories which are invariably more interesting. I'd also strongly recommend his "The First American Revolution". Historians make much of the failed Shays's Rebellion in 1786; this book tells the story of the more important and much more successful rebellion in Massachusetts in late 1774-early 1775.
Samugul
It is quite unsettling when the historical "truths" we believe to be absolute turn out to be embellishments, myths, or outright fabrications. We believe the Revolutionary War and the Founding Fathers to be sacred; they are beyond reproach. The truth is tough to take, but as Ray Raphael explains in great detail, the embellishment of any individual act of heroism during the Founding period of our nation cannot detract from the hundreds or thousands of acts of heroism that went on daily but just didn't make it into the history books. Often, the embellishments or myths that have evolved around a particularly famous event actually serve to portray that event as less exceptional than it really was. Many episodes from the Founding have been mythologized not from a desire to cover up the truth, but to convert what was a complex struggle into streamlined stories that could be passed down to children. This is why we must always be skeptical of oral traditions that are assumed to be fact: They are going to have been embellished; it is impossible for them not to have been. They may tell a great story or pass on an important moral, but allowing them to become dogma only conceals the truth.

Despite its flippant cover, Founding Myths is not light reading. Raphael does examine a few of the more recognized Founding stories, but he writes as if he is on a crusade, and before long he is delving deeply into the characters and motivations of the Founding Fathers themselves. He cites his sources, and I am sure he has done his research, but his interpretations are completely egalitarian: There seems to be no room in his worldview for individual impetus or catalysis. If any individual Founder acted in a particularly prescient or heroic way, he could only have done so because his constituents ordered him to. The Patriots rose up as one, in other words, the Founding Fathers were simply pushed to the front to do the bidding of the masses. Well, sure, sometimes, but our Revolution didn't go the way of the French Revolution, and the Founding Fathers are the reason.

This is an important book for those studying American history, but be prepared for some rambling and some egalitarian bias.
Samugul
It is quite unsettling when the historical "truths" we believe to be absolute turn out to be embellishments, myths, or outright fabrications. We believe the Revolutionary War and the Founding Fathers to be sacred; they are beyond reproach. The truth is tough to take, but as Ray Raphael explains in great detail, the embellishment of any individual act of heroism during the Founding period of our nation cannot detract from the hundreds or thousands of acts of heroism that went on daily but just didn't make it into the history books. Often, the embellishments or myths that have evolved around a particularly famous event actually serve to portray that event as less exceptional than it really was. Many episodes from the Founding have been mythologized not from a desire to cover up the truth, but to convert what was a complex struggle into streamlined stories that could be passed down to children. This is why we must always be skeptical of oral traditions that are assumed to be fact: They are going to have been embellished; it is impossible for them not to have been. They may tell a great story or pass on an important moral, but allowing them to become dogma only conceals the truth.

Despite its flippant cover, Founding Myths is not light reading. Raphael does examine a few of the more recognized Founding stories, but he writes as if he is on a crusade, and before long he is delving deeply into the characters and motivations of the Founding Fathers themselves. He cites his sources, and I am sure he has done his research, but his interpretations are completely egalitarian: There seems to be no room in his worldview for individual impetus or catalysis. If any individual Founder acted in a particularly prescient or heroic way, he could only have done so because his constituents ordered him to. The Patriots rose up as one, in other words, the Founding Fathers were simply pushed to the front to do the bidding of the masses. Well, sure, sometimes, but our Revolution didn't go the way of the French Revolution, and the Founding Fathers are the reason.

This is an important book for those studying American history, but be prepared for some rambling and some egalitarian bias.
Black_Hawk_Down.
Read this for the first time when it came out some ten years ago. Should be required reading in high schools and universities. Though at times dull Raphael with his meticulous reasearch paints a much richer story of Revolutionary America then contained in the standard myth presented by most schools today.
Black_Hawk_Down.
Read this for the first time when it came out some ten years ago. Should be required reading in high schools and universities. Though at times dull Raphael with his meticulous reasearch paints a much richer story of Revolutionary America then contained in the standard myth presented by most schools today.