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And the Walls Came Tumbling Down: Kentucky, Texas Western, and the Game That Changed American Sports epub download

by Frank Fitzpatrick


The book does a minimal job about the game itself, and in fact it says the game was kind of dull. Texas Western held a lead almost from the beginning, and though Kentucky cut it to a point or two a few times in the 2nd half, Texas Western had a 5-10 point lead down the stretch

The book does a minimal job about the game itself, and in fact it says the game was kind of dull. Texas Western held a lead almost from the beginning, and though Kentucky cut it to a point or two a few times in the 2nd half, Texas Western had a 5-10 point lead down the stretch. It was a fairly mundane victory. And when the style of play is compared to today, the author notes that it seems as if the players are in slow motion and that the court is much bigger because they simply don't take up a lot of space.

Sociologically and historically it was the most significant game ever in college athletics. In "And the Walls Came Tumbling Down, " veteran sportswriter Frank Fitzpatrick examines the game, the history that preceded it, and the sweeping changes that followed in its wake

Sociologically and historically it was the most significant game ever in college athletics. In "And the Walls Came Tumbling Down, " veteran sportswriter Frank Fitzpatrick examines the game, the history that preceded it, and the sweeping changes that followed in its wake. In profiling the coaches, the players, and the administrators, he details the impact of that championship game and paints a nuanced portrait of the events that belied the easy black-and-white characterization

The title team has been chronicled throughout the American media, including the book And the Walls Came Tumbling Down by Frank Fitzpatrick in 1999 and the 2006 Disney movie . Fitzpatrick, Frank (March 4, 1999).

The title team has been chronicled throughout the American media, including the book And the Walls Came Tumbling Down by Frank Fitzpatrick in 1999 and the 2006 Disney movie Glory Road  . And the Walls Came Tumbling Down: Kentucky, Texas Western, and the Game That Changed American Sports. Simon & Schuster.

Walls Came Tumbling Down : The Basketball Game That Changed American Sports.

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down : The Basketball Game That Changed American Sports. by Frank Fitzpatrick.

The competitors were the upstart Texas Western (now University of Texas, El Paso) Miners and an established power, the University of Kentucky . Kentucky, Texas Western, and the Game That Changed American Sports.

The competitors were the upstart Texas Western (now University of Texas, El Paso) Miners and an established power, the University of Kentucky Wildcats. More than a battle between teams, however, the game pitted two ways of life. The Miners fielded their five best players, who also happened to be African-American; it was basketball's first all-black starting roster. The Wildcats, coached by Adolph Rupp (whom the author compares to the infamous Birmingham, Al. police chief Bull Connor), were defiantly all-white.

Late on the night of March 19, 1966, in the University of Maryland's Cole Field House, five unassuming black men from Texas Western stepped onto the court to face five white men from the University of Kentucky. oceedings{, title {And the Walls Came Tumbling Down: Kentucky, Texas Western, and the Game That Changed American Sports}, author {Frank A. Fitzpatrick}, year {1999} }.

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Fitzpatrick's first full-length work, titled And the Walls Came Tumbling Down: Kentucky, Texas Western, and the Game That Changed American Sports, was published in 1999. All of the Wildcats' players were Caucasian and the team was led by legendary coach Adolph Rupp. Indeed, many people felt Rupp was a racist because he was unwilling to recruit African-American players.

Kentucky, Texas Western, and the Game That Changed American Sports. men's basketball tournament.

The mythos of the braggadocious Texas oil man resonates from Odessa to London and from Australia to Japan. The world that spawned that mythos provides the backdrop for Cole Thompson's first novel, Chocolate Lizards, a big-hearted, fun-loving romp. The game has been written about many times, but Frank Fitzpatrick's book, And the Walls Came Tumbling Down: Kentucky, Texas Western,and the Game That Changed American Sports, puts the game in context. He describes the segregated South and how Texas Western, now known as the University of Texas-El Paso, was able to recruit black players while other Texas schools could not.

An account of the 1966 NCAA championship game, won by the all-Black Texas Western team over the all-white Kentucky Wildcats

And the Walls Came Tumbling Down: Kentucky, Texas Western, and the Game That Changed American Sports epub download

ISBN13: 978-0684835518

ISBN: 0684835517

Author: Frank Fitzpatrick

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Complete Numbers Starting with 1, 1st Ed edition (March 4, 1999)

Pages: 256 pages

ePUB size: 1171 kb

FB2 size: 1571 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 773

Other Formats: lrf lit mbr mobi

Related to And the Walls Came Tumbling Down: Kentucky, Texas Western, and the Game That Changed American Sports ePub books

Benn
I love how the author went in-depth on various aspects of this topic: Texas Western coach and players, UK coach and history, to give a full picture of the people, their attitudes as well as the basketball season and game. Very highly recommened read.
Benn
I love how the author went in-depth on various aspects of this topic: Texas Western coach and players, UK coach and history, to give a full picture of the people, their attitudes as well as the basketball season and game. Very highly recommened read.
Ubrise
Delivery ahead of schedule. The book wasn't that great. The author was very biased so I don't feel like the whole story was accurately portrayed..also I did not read it for pleasure. It was for an assignment in grad school and I had to write a 10 page book review on it. So my opinion is a bit tainted :)
Ubrise
Delivery ahead of schedule. The book wasn't that great. The author was very biased so I don't feel like the whole story was accurately portrayed..also I did not read it for pleasure. It was for an assignment in grad school and I had to write a 10 page book review on it. So my opinion is a bit tainted :)
Original
I'm glad this book was written (done in late 1990s) at a time when most of the principals were still alive and were available to speak about the experience. The author goes into a deep dive into the sociology of the era, both at Kentucky under Adolph Rupp and at Texas Western under Don Haskins. As he points out, the differences couldn't have been more stark, except that both ran brutally long practices and controlled their players' lives in ways that are unimaginable today. Oh, and they were both basically drunks, especially as they aged.

The book does a minimal job about the game itself, and in fact it says the game was kind of dull. Texas Western held a lead almost from the beginning, and though Kentucky cut it to a point or two a few times in the 2nd half, Texas Western had a 5-10 point lead down the stretch. It was a fairly mundane victory. And when the style of play is compared to today, the author notes that it seems as if the players are in slow motion and that the court is much bigger because they simply don't take up a lot of space. It took another 15 years or so before the college game got really exciting -- thank you Magic Johnson and Larry Bird.

Anyway, the author explodes a lot of myths in this book, and he deserves credit for being the first to nail down those facts so prominently. More recent books about the game have followed his lead. Among the things he explains, perhaps the biggest two are that Texas Western was an undisciplined team of outlaws that used superior athleticism to swarm around the stoic Wildcats, and overwhelmed them. Wrong on all counts. Texas Western probably did have better athletes, but it won with defense. Kentucky was a run-and-gun team at the time, the highest scoring in the nation. Texas Western won by outrebounding opponents by 13-14 boards per game and stifling them with a man-to-man that never gave up. On offense, Texas Western was always deliberate, and they were even more so in the championship game because they were afraid of getting into a speed showdown with the smaller, faster Kentucky team.

Oh, and here's another myth disposed of early in the book. Rupp complained after the game and for another decade that Texas Western won with kids who didn't deserve to be in college, who were criminals, etc. Actually, more Texas Western kids graduated on time and graduated eventually than Kentucky players, and every single Texas Western player had a significant professional career. Every single one. Against all the odds, they did everything right.

Perhaps the most interesting parts are the discussions of the two coaches. The author rips Rupp over and over again for his racism, his sadism towards his players and his arrogance. He quotes numerous people who call Rupp the worst egoist they ever met (I'm guessing that those people had not met Donald Trump!). And that's how Rupp is remembered today, mostly due to his refusal to integrate his team, his loss vs. Texas Western, and his bitter complaints about it forever after. But at the same time, the author notes that there were some nuances in Rupp's life, such as his use of a black player when he began as a high school coach and his legitimate comments that even if he took on a black player, it would have been all-but-impossible for that player to compete in Mississippi or Alabama at the time.

Meanwhile, Haskins seems charming, but nonetheless not exactly a guy you'd model your life after. He's described as drinking a case of beer a night and of running his team through practices after midnight if they lost a game. But he recruited guys who he thought could play ball, and he didn't care about their color or their back-story -- a true believer in performance. There's a lot to commend about that type of attitude.

So, the book is a great review of a seminal moment in college basketball, and the real story therein. One more myth to explode: at the time, the black v. white thing wasn't quite as prominent as it became in later decades. Yes, everyone knew it was there, but because Kentucky was expected to win easily, the game had very little pre-game buildup, and even after the victory, Rupp's denunciation of his own team led many people to believe that it was a fluke.

A few complaints. The writing in the book isn't particularly good, and it suffers from a ton of repetition. A ton of repetition. A ton of repetition. Kind of like that, where the same thing will be written on three consecutive pages, as if you're not smart enough to remember a prominent fact, such as that Rupp finally had a black player on his final team, or that he considered trying to recruit Wes Unseld (who went to Louisville instead), but didn't try very hard. Unseld would have been the center on that Kentucky team -- and probably would have made a difference.

The book also has some weird shout-outs that make no sense. For example, it mentions that Gary Williams, future Maryland coach, was watching the NCAA final game because he was a college student at the time. But there's no quote from Williams about the game, nor any reference to what he thought about its significance. It's just dropping in his name for no apparent reason.
Original
I'm glad this book was written (done in late 1990s) at a time when most of the principals were still alive and were available to speak about the experience. The author goes into a deep dive into the sociology of the era, both at Kentucky under Adolph Rupp and at Texas Western under Don Haskins. As he points out, the differences couldn't have been more stark, except that both ran brutally long practices and controlled their players' lives in ways that are unimaginable today. Oh, and they were both basically drunks, especially as they aged.

The book does a minimal job about the game itself, and in fact it says the game was kind of dull. Texas Western held a lead almost from the beginning, and though Kentucky cut it to a point or two a few times in the 2nd half, Texas Western had a 5-10 point lead down the stretch. It was a fairly mundane victory. And when the style of play is compared to today, the author notes that it seems as if the players are in slow motion and that the court is much bigger because they simply don't take up a lot of space. It took another 15 years or so before the college game got really exciting -- thank you Magic Johnson and Larry Bird.

Anyway, the author explodes a lot of myths in this book, and he deserves credit for being the first to nail down those facts so prominently. More recent books about the game have followed his lead. Among the things he explains, perhaps the biggest two are that Texas Western was an undisciplined team of outlaws that used superior athleticism to swarm around the stoic Wildcats, and overwhelmed them. Wrong on all counts. Texas Western probably did have better athletes, but it won with defense. Kentucky was a run-and-gun team at the time, the highest scoring in the nation. Texas Western won by outrebounding opponents by 13-14 boards per game and stifling them with a man-to-man that never gave up. On offense, Texas Western was always deliberate, and they were even more so in the championship game because they were afraid of getting into a speed showdown with the smaller, faster Kentucky team.

Oh, and here's another myth disposed of early in the book. Rupp complained after the game and for another decade that Texas Western won with kids who didn't deserve to be in college, who were criminals, etc. Actually, more Texas Western kids graduated on time and graduated eventually than Kentucky players, and every single Texas Western player had a significant professional career. Every single one. Against all the odds, they did everything right.

Perhaps the most interesting parts are the discussions of the two coaches. The author rips Rupp over and over again for his racism, his sadism towards his players and his arrogance. He quotes numerous people who call Rupp the worst egoist they ever met (I'm guessing that those people had not met Donald Trump!). And that's how Rupp is remembered today, mostly due to his refusal to integrate his team, his loss vs. Texas Western, and his bitter complaints about it forever after. But at the same time, the author notes that there were some nuances in Rupp's life, such as his use of a black player when he began as a high school coach and his legitimate comments that even if he took on a black player, it would have been all-but-impossible for that player to compete in Mississippi or Alabama at the time.

Meanwhile, Haskins seems charming, but nonetheless not exactly a guy you'd model your life after. He's described as drinking a case of beer a night and of running his team through practices after midnight if they lost a game. But he recruited guys who he thought could play ball, and he didn't care about their color or their back-story -- a true believer in performance. There's a lot to commend about that type of attitude.

So, the book is a great review of a seminal moment in college basketball, and the real story therein. One more myth to explode: at the time, the black v. white thing wasn't quite as prominent as it became in later decades. Yes, everyone knew it was there, but because Kentucky was expected to win easily, the game had very little pre-game buildup, and even after the victory, Rupp's denunciation of his own team led many people to believe that it was a fluke.

A few complaints. The writing in the book isn't particularly good, and it suffers from a ton of repetition. A ton of repetition. A ton of repetition. Kind of like that, where the same thing will be written on three consecutive pages, as if you're not smart enough to remember a prominent fact, such as that Rupp finally had a black player on his final team, or that he considered trying to recruit Wes Unseld (who went to Louisville instead), but didn't try very hard. Unseld would have been the center on that Kentucky team -- and probably would have made a difference.

The book also has some weird shout-outs that make no sense. For example, it mentions that Gary Williams, future Maryland coach, was watching the NCAA final game because he was a college student at the time. But there's no quote from Williams about the game, nor any reference to what he thought about its significance. It's just dropping in his name for no apparent reason.
ChallengeMine
I agree withthe Kirkus review. This is a very well-researched account of an exceptional time in college basketball that had far-reaching consequences. While it's true that walls would have come down eventually, the way it happened was magical. The book gives a good account of that season from different perspectives. I think the writing could have been tightened up a bit, but it was a very enjoyable read overall. I read a lot and pass many books to others but his one will stay in my collection.
ChallengeMine
I agree withthe Kirkus review. This is a very well-researched account of an exceptional time in college basketball that had far-reaching consequences. While it's true that walls would have come down eventually, the way it happened was magical. The book gives a good account of that season from different perspectives. I think the writing could have been tightened up a bit, but it was a very enjoyable read overall. I read a lot and pass many books to others but his one will stay in my collection.
Ydely
Frank Fitzpatrick has undertaken and successfully written a much needed book that should set the record straight forever about Texas Western College in El Paso and the much revered Don Haskins in 1966. "And The Walls Came Tumbling Down" is well-researched, beautifully structured and concisely written as pure as journalism can offer. Hey - if you were a part of the memorable experience like I was in El Paso as a 10-year-old youngster in 1966, you remember all the fine print and details. Fitzpatrick does make one serious error. He writes in Chapter 10 that Texas Western was not invited back the following season in 1967 to the NCAA. Wrong. The Miners went to the tournament's western regional and fell a game shy of playing a UCLA team led by a sophomore named Lew Alcinder. It would have been a pleasure to read Fitzpatrick's hypothesis about the dream meeting - Texas Western's David Lattin and a transfer from New York that year named Phil Harris versus Alcinder. Could you have imagined? Thank God the Philadelphia journalist came along and put some sacred cows like Sports Illustrated and its James Olsen series in 1968 and the thoroughly disgusting James Michener's analysis of the Miners in his "Sports in America" book where they rightfully belong - in the trash can. "The real story of Texas Western's championship team is far different from the myth that has grown around it," Fitzpatrick writes. YEA! Fitzpatrick deserves more than a pat on the back for accurately describing El Paso and what we thought of our heroes. He should be hugged. He accurately writes there wasn't the faintest hint of exploitation or racism toward black athletes. Fitzpatrick successfully portrays who those Miners were. They were winners. They were El Paso. Ultimately, they were us. We couldn't have been prouder. We embraced what that team accomplished and will always. Fitzpatrick even captured the bedlam at El Paso International Airport when our heroes arrived home. I cried reading it like I did then. The memory tingles now. It should forever thanks to a magnificent book like this one.
Ydely
Frank Fitzpatrick has undertaken and successfully written a much needed book that should set the record straight forever about Texas Western College in El Paso and the much revered Don Haskins in 1966. "And The Walls Came Tumbling Down" is well-researched, beautifully structured and concisely written as pure as journalism can offer. Hey - if you were a part of the memorable experience like I was in El Paso as a 10-year-old youngster in 1966, you remember all the fine print and details. Fitzpatrick does make one serious error. He writes in Chapter 10 that Texas Western was not invited back the following season in 1967 to the NCAA. Wrong. The Miners went to the tournament's western regional and fell a game shy of playing a UCLA team led by a sophomore named Lew Alcinder. It would have been a pleasure to read Fitzpatrick's hypothesis about the dream meeting - Texas Western's David Lattin and a transfer from New York that year named Phil Harris versus Alcinder. Could you have imagined? Thank God the Philadelphia journalist came along and put some sacred cows like Sports Illustrated and its James Olsen series in 1968 and the thoroughly disgusting James Michener's analysis of the Miners in his "Sports in America" book where they rightfully belong - in the trash can. "The real story of Texas Western's championship team is far different from the myth that has grown around it," Fitzpatrick writes. YEA! Fitzpatrick deserves more than a pat on the back for accurately describing El Paso and what we thought of our heroes. He should be hugged. He accurately writes there wasn't the faintest hint of exploitation or racism toward black athletes. Fitzpatrick successfully portrays who those Miners were. They were winners. They were El Paso. Ultimately, they were us. We couldn't have been prouder. We embraced what that team accomplished and will always. Fitzpatrick even captured the bedlam at El Paso International Airport when our heroes arrived home. I cried reading it like I did then. The memory tingles now. It should forever thanks to a magnificent book like this one.