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The Capture of Louisbourg, 1758 (Campaigns and Commanders Series) epub download

by Hugh Boscawen


It has been much written about, but Hugh Boscawen's "The Capture of Louisbourg 1758" has set a remarkably high bar for future historians to clear.

It has been much written about, but Hugh Boscawen's "The Capture of Louisbourg 1758" has set a remarkably high bar for future historians to clear. Boscawen brings years of professional military experience and a lifetime interest in the siege to bear in an outstanding campaign narrative.

The Siege of Louisbourg was a pivotal operation of the Seven Years' War (known in the United States as the French and Indian War) in 1758 that ended the French colonial era in Atlantic Canada and led to the subsequent British campaign to capture Quebec in 1759 and the remainder o. .

The Siege of Louisbourg was a pivotal operation of the Seven Years' War (known in the United States as the French and Indian War) in 1758 that ended the French colonial era in Atlantic Canada and led to the subsequent British campaign to capture Quebec in 1759 and the remainder of French North America the following year.

Hugh Boscawen describes how Britain's war minister William Pitt launched four fleets in a coordinated campaign to prevent France from reinforcing Louisbourg. in a series called Campaigns and Commanders. As the author shows, the Royal Navy outfought its opponents before General Jeffery Amherst and Brigadier James Wolfe successfully led 14,000 British regulars, including American-born redcoats, rangers, and carpenters, in a hard-fought assault landing.

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Электронная книга "The Capture of Louisbourg, 1758", Hugh Boscawen. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Capture of Louisbourg, 1758" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Book in the Campaigns and Commanders Series). In 1755, Great Britain and France stumbled into the French and Indian War, part of what (to Europe) became the Seven Years' War-only for British forces to suffer successive defeats.

The Capture of Louisbourg, 1758. Campaigns and Commanders. of Oklahoma Press, 2011. The British amphibious operation to capture the French fortress at Louisbourg in Canada during the Seven Years' War was the largest joint operation undertaken by British forces in that period.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. William Pitt and Louisbourg Louisbourg, 1713-57 Planning the 1758 campaign The Louisbourg naval campaign in Europe, 1757-58 The close watch off Louisbourg, Spring 1758 The joint operation prepares, April-May The assault landing at Louisbourg, June The siege, June The siege, 1-15 July The bombardment, 16-27 July Aftermath Conclusion. Geographic Name: Louisbourg (.

Hugh Boscawen describes how Britain's war minister William Pitt launched four fleets in a coordinated campaign . Edward Boscawen, who commanded the Royal Navy fleet at Louisbourg, examines the pivotal 1758 Louisbourg campaign from both the British and French perspectives. Together they besieged the fortress, which surrendered after forty-nine days.

Книга: Hugh Boscawen The Capture of Louisbourg, 1758. Volume 27 in the Campaigns and Commanders Series.

Author: Hugh Boscawen. Title: The Capture of Louisbourg, 1758 (Campaigns and Commanders Series). Drawing on myriad primary sources, including previously unpublished correspondence, Boscawen also answers the question "What did the soldiers and sailors who fought there do all day?­" The result is the most comprehensive history of this strategically important campaign ever written.

Louisbourg, France's impressive fortress on Cape Breton Island's foggy Atlantic coast, dominated access to the St. Lawrence and colonial New France for forty years in the mid-eighteenth century. In 1755, Great Britain and France stumbled into the French and Indian War, part of what (to Europe) became the Seven Years' War—only for British forces to suffer successive defeats. In 1758, Britain and France, as well as Indian nations caught in the rivalry, fought for high stakes: the future of colonial America.

Hugh Boscawen describes how Britain's war minister William Pitt launched four fleets in a coordinated campaign to prevent France from reinforcing Louisbourg. As the author shows, the Royal Navy outfought its opponents before General Jeffery Amherst and Brigadier James Wolfe successfully led 14,000 British regulars, including American-born redcoats, rangers, and carpenters, in a hard-fought assault landing. Together they besieged the fortress, which surrendered after forty-nine days. The victory marked a turning point in British fortunes and precipitated the end of French rule in North America.

Boscawen, an experienced soldier and sailor, and a direct descendant of Admiral the Hon. Edward Boscawen, who commanded the Royal Navy fleet at Louisbourg, examines the pivotal 1758 Louisbourg campaign from both the British and French perspectives. Drawing on myriad primary sources, including previously unpublished correspondence, Boscawen also answers the question "What did the soldiers and sailors who fought there do all day?" The result is the most comprehensive history of this strategically important campaign ever written.

The Capture of Louisbourg, 1758 (Campaigns and Commanders Series) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0806141558

ISBN: 0806141557

Author: Hugh Boscawen

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 2011)

Pages: 408 pages

ePUB size: 1836 kb

FB2 size: 1736 kb

Rating: 4.6

Votes: 974

Other Formats: lrf lit mbr rtf

Related to The Capture of Louisbourg, 1758 (Campaigns and Commanders Series) ePub books

Uaoteowi
The siege of the French Canada fortress of Louisbourg in 1758 is an iconic moment in the Seven Years War/French and Indian War, surpassed only by the Fall of Quebec for drama and impact. It has been much written about, but Hugh Boscawen's "The Capture of Louisbourg 1758" has set a remarkably high bar for future historians to clear. Boscawen brings years of professional military experience and a lifetime interest in the siege to bear in an outstanding campaign narrative.

The author sets the strategic background of the Seven Years War, then methodically walks the reader up through the detailed British planning for the siege, the naval campaign on both sides of the Atlantic to defeat French efforts to send supplies and reinforcements, and finally the marshaling and training of the British-American landing force. The campaign itself is described with a nice combination of operational level perspective and details on individual leaders and their actions. The narrative concludes with a balanced and clear analysis on the importance of the siege. The text is supplemented by a small but well-chosen selection of illustrations and a detailed order of battle for both sides. It's a small point, but the only maps are on the end sheets. Highly recommended to the student of the conflict and the general reader.
Uaoteowi
The siege of the French Canada fortress of Louisbourg in 1758 is an iconic moment in the Seven Years War/French and Indian War, surpassed only by the Fall of Quebec for drama and impact. It has been much written about, but Hugh Boscawen's "The Capture of Louisbourg 1758" has set a remarkably high bar for future historians to clear. Boscawen brings years of professional military experience and a lifetime interest in the siege to bear in an outstanding campaign narrative.

The author sets the strategic background of the Seven Years War, then methodically walks the reader up through the detailed British planning for the siege, the naval campaign on both sides of the Atlantic to defeat French efforts to send supplies and reinforcements, and finally the marshaling and training of the British-American landing force. The campaign itself is described with a nice combination of operational level perspective and details on individual leaders and their actions. The narrative concludes with a balanced and clear analysis on the importance of the siege. The text is supplemented by a small but well-chosen selection of illustrations and a detailed order of battle for both sides. It's a small point, but the only maps are on the end sheets. Highly recommended to the student of the conflict and the general reader.
Stoneshaper
Today, we consider geopolitical hotspots to be locales as varied as the Persian Gulf, the Malacca Straits, and the East and South China Seas. Just over 2 ½ centuries ago, the northwest Atlantic and the mouth of the St. Lawrence River served as a premier international geopolitical flashpoint. This well-written and resourced traditional military history describes how the British were able to capture the French fortress of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia's Cape Breton Island and would later achieve victory at Quebec and a successful, albeit costly, conclusion to the French-American/Seven Years War.

Boscawen provides exhaustive detail of French and British policymaking and preparation in the period leading up to this conflict. He has done significant archival research using British, Canadian, and French sources while also providing comprehensive appendices featuring order of battle information, a detailed description of contemporary Louisbourg which is ably managed by Parks Canada, (Canada's equivalent to the U.S. National Park Service), and casualty information. This book is an essential resource for readers desirous of understanding the profound international geopolitical and strategic significance of the French-Indian/Seven Years War and how it would come to influence the U.S. Revolutionary War. On a concluding note, I was fortunate to visit Louisbourg several years ago and enthusiastically recommend visiting this sensational site. Visiting it should be on the bucket list for anyone interested in American or European military history and the 18th century Canadian historical development.
Stoneshaper
Today, we consider geopolitical hotspots to be locales as varied as the Persian Gulf, the Malacca Straits, and the East and South China Seas. Just over 2 ½ centuries ago, the northwest Atlantic and the mouth of the St. Lawrence River served as a premier international geopolitical flashpoint. This well-written and resourced traditional military history describes how the British were able to capture the French fortress of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia's Cape Breton Island and would later achieve victory at Quebec and a successful, albeit costly, conclusion to the French-American/Seven Years War.

Boscawen provides exhaustive detail of French and British policymaking and preparation in the period leading up to this conflict. He has done significant archival research using British, Canadian, and French sources while also providing comprehensive appendices featuring order of battle information, a detailed description of contemporary Louisbourg which is ably managed by Parks Canada, (Canada's equivalent to the U.S. National Park Service), and casualty information. This book is an essential resource for readers desirous of understanding the profound international geopolitical and strategic significance of the French-Indian/Seven Years War and how it would come to influence the U.S. Revolutionary War. On a concluding note, I was fortunate to visit Louisbourg several years ago and enthusiastically recommend visiting this sensational site. Visiting it should be on the bucket list for anyone interested in American or European military history and the 18th century Canadian historical development.
Teonyo
A summary of the review on StrategyPage.Com:

'Boscawen is a former British Army officer and rather prolific historian of eighteenth century naval and military history, who not incidentally is a descendant of the Adm. Edward Boscawen, who figures prominently in the work. He gives us an account of the reduction of the French fortress of Louisbourg, on Cape Breton Isle, during the Seven Years’ War. Boscawen opens with a look at the shaping of British strategy, followed by one on the history of the fortress, from 1715, through its capture by a New England expedition in 1745, its return to France by treaty, and on through 1757. He follows these with chapters covering overall planning for the operation, the preparatory naval campaign and the blockade of the fortress, army and navy preparations for a joint expedition, and the initial landings on Cape Breton Isle. Boscawen devotes three chapters to the eight-week siege, from the initial investment, through the opening of siege lines, and on the final sustained bombardment that led to its surrender on July 26, 1758. Two more chapters discuss the consequences of the fall of Louisbourg and offers some general conclusions. This is an important work for those interested in eighteenth century military history and also for students of expeditionary warfare, as it is an excellent account of the sophistication of British joint expeditionary operations in the mid-eighteenth century."

For the full review, see StrategyPage.Com
Teonyo
A summary of the review on StrategyPage.Com:

'Boscawen is a former British Army officer and rather prolific historian of eighteenth century naval and military history, who not incidentally is a descendant of the Adm. Edward Boscawen, who figures prominently in the work. He gives us an account of the reduction of the French fortress of Louisbourg, on Cape Breton Isle, during the Seven Years’ War. Boscawen opens with a look at the shaping of British strategy, followed by one on the history of the fortress, from 1715, through its capture by a New England expedition in 1745, its return to France by treaty, and on through 1757. He follows these with chapters covering overall planning for the operation, the preparatory naval campaign and the blockade of the fortress, army and navy preparations for a joint expedition, and the initial landings on Cape Breton Isle. Boscawen devotes three chapters to the eight-week siege, from the initial investment, through the opening of siege lines, and on the final sustained bombardment that led to its surrender on July 26, 1758. Two more chapters discuss the consequences of the fall of Louisbourg and offers some general conclusions. This is an important work for those interested in eighteenth century military history and also for students of expeditionary warfare, as it is an excellent account of the sophistication of British joint expeditionary operations in the mid-eighteenth century."

For the full review, see StrategyPage.Com