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Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South (New Directions In Southern History) epub download

by Kristina DuRocher Ph.D.


2 The Growth of White Privilege in Southern Schools. 3 White Children and the Culture of Segregation.

2 The Growth of White Privilege in Southern Schools. 35. 61. 4 The Violent Reality of White Youths Socialization. 93. 5 Ritual and Performance in Southern Lynchings. 113. 6 White Girls Participation in Southern Lynchings. Kristina DuRocher, assistant professor of history at Morehead State University, lives in Morehead, Kentucky. Библиографические данные. Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South New directions in southern history.

Raising Racists book. Their socialization in the segregated South offers an examination of white supremacy from the inside, showcasing the culture's efforts to preserve itself by teaching its beliefs to the next generation. In Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South, author Kristina DuRocher reveals how white adults in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries continually reinforced race and gender roles to maintain white supremacy.

White children rested at the core of the system of segregation between 1890 and 1939 because their participation was crucial to ensuring the future of white supremacy.

Series: New Directions in Southern History. Published by: University Press of Kentucky. White children rested at the core of the system of segregation between 1890 and 1939 because their participation was crucial to ensuring the future of white supremacy.

Jim Crow laws were state and local laws that enforced racial segregation in the Southern United States. All were enacted in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by white state legislatures after the Reconstruction period

Jim Crow laws were state and local laws that enforced racial segregation in the Southern United States. All were enacted in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by white state legislatures after the Reconstruction period. The laws were enforced until 1965. In practice, Jim Crow laws mandated racial segregation in all public facilities in the states of the former Confederate States of America and other states, starting in the 1870s and 1880s

White children rested at the core of the system of segregation between 1890 and 1939 because their participation was crucial to ensuring the future of white supremacy.

In this slim but hard-hitting book, Kristina DuRocher offers a damning assessment of the socialization of white children in the Jim Crow South. By focusing on the role of children in the Jim Crow South, Du-Rocher addresses many of the same themes as Jennifer Ritterhouse's Growing Up Jim Crow: How Black and White Southern Children Learned Race (2006).

oceedings{Smith2012RaisingRT, title {Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children . Schools and the No-Prison Phenomenon: Anti-Blackness and Secondary Policing in the Black Lives Matter Era. Lynette Parker.

oceedings{Smith2012RaisingRT, title {Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South}, author {Katy Smith}, year {2012} }. Katy Smith.

White southerners recognized that the perpetuation of segregation required whites of all ages to uphold a strict social order―especially the young members of the next generation. White children rested at the core of the system of segregation between 1890 and 1939 because their participation was crucial to ensuring the future of white supremacy. Their socialization in the segregated South offers an examination of white supremacy from the inside, showcasing the culture's efforts to preserve itself by teaching its beliefs to the next generation.In Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South, author Kristina DuRocher reveals how white adults in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries continually reinforced race and gender roles to maintain white supremacy. DuRocher examines the practices, mores, and traditions that trained white children to fear, dehumanize, and disdain their black neighbors. Raising Racists combines an analysis of the remembered experiences of a racist society, how that society influenced children, and, most important, how racial violence and brutality shaped growing up in the early-twentieth-century South.

Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South (New Directions In Southern History) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0813130019

ISBN: 0813130018

Author: Kristina DuRocher Ph.D.

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky (March 30, 2011)

Pages: 248 pages

ePUB size: 1913 kb

FB2 size: 1990 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 528

Other Formats: txt lrf doc azw

Related to Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South (New Directions In Southern History) ePub books

Faell
I really enjoyed reading this title as it provided a glimpse into history from WW1 up until then end of the civil rights movement of 1964. It gives you a look into race relations in the south and how a lot of southerners viewed and interacted with African Americans, how media manipulated the minds of Europeans and how through these mediums were able to maintain the ideology of white supremacy. In all it's a great read if you are looking for that missing link between emancipation and the civil rights generation.
Faell
I really enjoyed reading this title as it provided a glimpse into history from WW1 up until then end of the civil rights movement of 1964. It gives you a look into race relations in the south and how a lot of southerners viewed and interacted with African Americans, how media manipulated the minds of Europeans and how through these mediums were able to maintain the ideology of white supremacy. In all it's a great read if you are looking for that missing link between emancipation and the civil rights generation.
Haal
Durocher approaches the subject of racism in the Jim Crow South from an undeniably important angle - through the upbringing of white children. What she presents is difficult to swallow because it reveals a culture that permeates the sensitive minds of children in a profoundly harmful manner. It is a culture that glorified lynching as wholesome, family fun on a beautiful Sunday afternoon. Children could even go home with a souvenir: a finger or ear, perhaps. When we learn about lynching, we often neglect to think about children in this regard. Yes, grown-ups were intolerant and violent, but it is not common to think that there were children tugging at their pants, curious to learn what it is that their parents were so excited about.

Unfortunately, the pervasiveness of the racist culture ran deeper than Sunday afternoons in the park. Every aspect of a child's life was controlled by white grown-ups: at home, in schools, in advertising, etc. This system served to perpetuate racism through generations of white children. White southerners were excellent at controlling this system and used it to manipulate the minds of their youth in an effort to cling to a culture of white supremacy.

Durocher delves into all of these topics and allows the reader to peer into a world where we are forced to consider the repercussions of such a society and the damage that it caused not only to white children, but to the nation as a whole. She has presented a thorough and evocative case study that will leave the reader surprised, repulsed, and, most importantly, reflective.
Haal
Durocher approaches the subject of racism in the Jim Crow South from an undeniably important angle - through the upbringing of white children. What she presents is difficult to swallow because it reveals a culture that permeates the sensitive minds of children in a profoundly harmful manner. It is a culture that glorified lynching as wholesome, family fun on a beautiful Sunday afternoon. Children could even go home with a souvenir: a finger or ear, perhaps. When we learn about lynching, we often neglect to think about children in this regard. Yes, grown-ups were intolerant and violent, but it is not common to think that there were children tugging at their pants, curious to learn what it is that their parents were so excited about.

Unfortunately, the pervasiveness of the racist culture ran deeper than Sunday afternoons in the park. Every aspect of a child's life was controlled by white grown-ups: at home, in schools, in advertising, etc. This system served to perpetuate racism through generations of white children. White southerners were excellent at controlling this system and used it to manipulate the minds of their youth in an effort to cling to a culture of white supremacy.

Durocher delves into all of these topics and allows the reader to peer into a world where we are forced to consider the repercussions of such a society and the damage that it caused not only to white children, but to the nation as a whole. She has presented a thorough and evocative case study that will leave the reader surprised, repulsed, and, most importantly, reflective.
Wrathmaster
This book showed how children were indoctrinated with the culture of White Supremacy and that the system had to be protected at all costs. Excellent in showing the effects of how such a way of life was very destructive.
Wrathmaster
This book showed how children were indoctrinated with the culture of White Supremacy and that the system had to be protected at all costs. Excellent in showing the effects of how such a way of life was very destructive.