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Bull'S-Eyes and Misfires: 50 People Whose Obscure Efforts Shaped the American Civil War epub download

by Clint Johnson


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Fascinated with the American Civil War since childhood, Johnson has written eight books on the subject. Bull's-Eyes and Misfires: 50 Obscure People Whose Efforts Shaped the American Civil War, 2002, Rutledge Hill Press, ISBN 1-55853-961-1. He was also coauthor of They Call Me Big House, ISBN 0-89587-303-6, the autobiography of the late Clarence Gaines, one of America's best collegiate basketball coaches. Johnson is also the author of two corporate biographies, and hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles on business, history and travel. In the Footsteps of Stonewall Jackson, 2002, John F. Blair Publisher

Book Overview "Bull's-Eyes and Misfires," however, tells the fascinating stories of fifty.

Bull's-Eyes and Misfires : 50 Obscure People Whose Efforts Shaped the American Civil War. by Clint Johnson. You don't have to know much about the Civil War to be familiar with Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, Stonewall Jackson, or William Tecumseh Sherman. Bull's-Eyes and Misfires," however, tells the fascinating stories of fifty largely unknown people who dramatically changed the course of the Civil War by their heroic efforts or bungling mistakes. Here are the stories of: "Col.

Bull's-Eyes and Misfires: 50 Obscure People Whose Efforts Shaped the American Civil War, just finished .

Bull's-Eyes and Misfires: 50 Obscure People Whose Efforts Shaped the American Civil War, just finished it - Good Read, thanks. English (US) · Suomi · Svenska · Español · Português (Brasil). Civil War historian Johnson (A Vast and Fiendish Plot) turns his attention to naval warfare in this enjoyable history of destroyer class warships, which formed the backbone of most 20th-centu.

Bull'S-Eyes and Misfires: 50 People Whose Obscure Efforts Shaped the American Civil War by Clint Johnson . But people being people, even the soldiers who fought in this terrible war had to see its humorous, or at least ironic, side.

Ships from and sold by breadbakerjulie. Johnson has here provided about seventy short vignettes of Civil War oddities, not all blunders by any means but wry takes on Civil War actions large and small, familiar and arcane. Johnson writes with verve, and the book makes enjoyable leisure-time reading.

Bull's-Eyes and Misfires: 50 People whose obscure efforts shaped the American Civil War by Clint Johnson This is more an Alternative History. It had also been Buell that had gone down to Charleston before the outbreak of the war and advised that Major Anderson that he withdraw his troops from the surrounding forts to Fort Sumter. WI it was Buell that was recognized for the victory at Shiloh? Looks like it will be informative. Blair Publisher

Fascinated with the American Civil War since childhood, Johnson has written eight books on the subject. Bull's-Eyes and Misfires: 50 Obscure People Whose Efforts Shaped the American Civil War, 2002, Rutledge Hill Press, ISBN 1558539611. He was also coauthor of They Call Me Big House, ISBN 0895873036, the autobiography of the late Clarence Gaines, one of America's best collegiate basketball coaches. Blair Publisher, ISBN 0895872447.

Clint Johnson is an author and military historian whose books include The Politically Incorrect Guide to the South, Bull's-Eyes and Misfires: 50 Obscure People Whose Efforts Shaped the American Civil Wa. .

Clint Johnson is an author and military historian whose books include The Politically Incorrect Guide to the South, Bull's-Eyes and Misfires: 50 Obscure People Whose Efforts Shaped the American Civil War, and Colonial America and the American Revolution.

Johnson says the government is focusing on the people's priorities, but there's nothing about . Civil liberties are also threatened.

Johnson says the government is focusing on the people's priorities, but there's nothing about how Britain's rail fares - the highest in Europe - are going to be reduced. They go up by another . % in January.

You don't have to know much about the Civil War to be familiar with Robert E.Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, Stonewall Jackson, or William Tecumseh Sherman. Bull's-Eyes and Misfires, however, tells the fascinating stories of fifty largelyunknown people who dramatically changed the course of the Civil War by theirheroic efforts or bungling mistakes. Here are the stories of:

Col. George Rains who used his skill as a businessman to build agunpowder factory in Augusta, Georgia that was impressive in its efficiency even by modern standards and manufactured nearly three million pounds of powder. TheConfederacy lacked many things, but gunpowder was not one of them.

Confederate Maj. John Barry ordered the volley that wounded (and eventually killed) Stonewall Jackson at Chancellorsville. One can only speculatehow the outcome of the War might have been different had Barry not accidentally shot his own general.

Julia Grant, the wife of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, kept her husband soberand focused by just showing up and living near him before and after nearly every major battle. When she was not around, he drank out of loneliness. When she wasaround, his Army won battles.

Gen. James Wolfe Ripley hated waste so much that he refused to buymodern repeating weapons for the Union Army. He believed soldiers would firewithout taking aim. His decision not to distribute superior weapons for at leasta year delayed the end of the war.

 

Bull'S-Eyes and Misfires: 50 People Whose Obscure Efforts Shaped the American Civil War epub download

ISBN13: 978-1558539617

ISBN: 1558539611

Author: Clint Johnson

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Rutledge Hill Pr; First Edition edition (October 1, 2002)

Pages: 276 pages

ePUB size: 1700 kb

FB2 size: 1109 kb

Rating: 4.8

Votes: 617

Other Formats: txt mobi rtf mbr

Related to Bull'S-Eyes and Misfires: 50 People Whose Obscure Efforts Shaped the American Civil War ePub books

fetish
General James Ripley's efforts as Chief of Ordnance put more reliable, mass produced, and effective weapons in Union Soldiers hands than any before or after him. Ripley did not (like so many claim without really looking at all available sources) stand in the way of innovation, but rather the chaos and confusion of non-standardized arms and ammunition. Ripley inherited a department that in 1861 had 600 different types of artillery ammunition, more than forty different types of cartidges for shoulder arms, and barely produced 14,000 weapons a year. By 1863 Artillery ammunition was reduced to only 140 different types, and the Springfield Armory was producing over 218,000 weapons yearly. As to Ripley turning down the Spencer rifle, Ripley's judgement was sound and right on. First, the Spencer was never really able to be mass produced like the Springfield. By June 1862 three promised deliveries had not been made, so the order was cut from 10,000 to 7,500. The reason for the delays were obvious; the gun still needed modifications to work properly. Problems obtaining skilled workers, machine tool parts, and raw material also delayed the Spencer. In all only about 12,000 Spencer rifles were delivered during the War. Of the M1860 Carbines, almost half of those produced never made it to the hands of troops before the South surrendered. General Ripley was an ordnance officer since 1814; he was an expert, and understood that breech loading was the next step in weapons evolution. He just did not feel that any one weapon had this principle perfected enough to be mass produced. Dependable ammunition for these guns was still several years away from full development and he knew it. It wasn't the Ghost of Ripley or something "strange" that made the standard weapon of the Cavalry the Model 1873 Springfield carbine. It was the fact that it worked well and the Spencer didn't. S.E. Whitman writes in The Troopers: "Because of the demonstrated faults found in all repeating carbines available at the time, the Ordnance Department reverted to a foolproof weapon of its own design, the Model 1873 Springfield carbine, which was to be the mainstay of the Cavalry until the 1890's."

At the time Ripley left as chief of Ordnance, the .58 Cailiber Springfield rifle was the standard weapon of choice for the Army. There was no shortage of these reliable standardized weapons or their ammunition. Ripley accomplished this by making his department a production agency for standardized, reliable, time tested weapons rather than a research and development facility in time of war. In my judgement this accomplishment hastened the Civil War's end, not prolonged it.
fetish
General James Ripley's efforts as Chief of Ordnance put more reliable, mass produced, and effective weapons in Union Soldiers hands than any before or after him. Ripley did not (like so many claim without really looking at all available sources) stand in the way of innovation, but rather the chaos and confusion of non-standardized arms and ammunition. Ripley inherited a department that in 1861 had 600 different types of artillery ammunition, more than forty different types of cartidges for shoulder arms, and barely produced 14,000 weapons a year. By 1863 Artillery ammunition was reduced to only 140 different types, and the Springfield Armory was producing over 218,000 weapons yearly. As to Ripley turning down the Spencer rifle, Ripley's judgement was sound and right on. First, the Spencer was never really able to be mass produced like the Springfield. By June 1862 three promised deliveries had not been made, so the order was cut from 10,000 to 7,500. The reason for the delays were obvious; the gun still needed modifications to work properly. Problems obtaining skilled workers, machine tool parts, and raw material also delayed the Spencer. In all only about 12,000 Spencer rifles were delivered during the War. Of the M1860 Carbines, almost half of those produced never made it to the hands of troops before the South surrendered. General Ripley was an ordnance officer since 1814; he was an expert, and understood that breech loading was the next step in weapons evolution. He just did not feel that any one weapon had this principle perfected enough to be mass produced. Dependable ammunition for these guns was still several years away from full development and he knew it. It wasn't the Ghost of Ripley or something "strange" that made the standard weapon of the Cavalry the Model 1873 Springfield carbine. It was the fact that it worked well and the Spencer didn't. S.E. Whitman writes in The Troopers: "Because of the demonstrated faults found in all repeating carbines available at the time, the Ordnance Department reverted to a foolproof weapon of its own design, the Model 1873 Springfield carbine, which was to be the mainstay of the Cavalry until the 1890's."

At the time Ripley left as chief of Ordnance, the .58 Cailiber Springfield rifle was the standard weapon of choice for the Army. There was no shortage of these reliable standardized weapons or their ammunition. Ripley accomplished this by making his department a production agency for standardized, reliable, time tested weapons rather than a research and development facility in time of war. In my judgement this accomplishment hastened the Civil War's end, not prolonged it.
Ferne
Although I am no "buff," I consider myself fairly well read on the Civil War and I only recognized about ten of the fifty names here and almost none of the stories discussed. The author's research makes it clear, though, that these people had a very important role in the war. You can object to his classifications - most people would think Colonel Gorgas was one of the best administrators either side had, not the "misfire" Mr. Johnson claims him to be - but challenging his judgments is part of the fun.
Ferne
Although I am no "buff," I consider myself fairly well read on the Civil War and I only recognized about ten of the fifty names here and almost none of the stories discussed. The author's research makes it clear, though, that these people had a very important role in the war. You can object to his classifications - most people would think Colonel Gorgas was one of the best administrators either side had, not the "misfire" Mr. Johnson claims him to be - but challenging his judgments is part of the fun.
kewdiepie
Another book that has valuable information in it. An easy read, but so interesting also. I have truly enjoyed reading it.
I can take a break during the day and read a couple of chapters in no time. Then I'm ready to return to work.
Thank you for having this book especially for me. Arrival time fast. Wrapped well. Price excellent.
Sincerely,
Barb
kewdiepie
Another book that has valuable information in it. An easy read, but so interesting also. I have truly enjoyed reading it.
I can take a break during the day and read a couple of chapters in no time. Then I'm ready to return to work.
Thank you for having this book especially for me. Arrival time fast. Wrapped well. Price excellent.
Sincerely,
Barb