» » Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti-Memoir

Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti-Memoir epub download

by Marc Cooper


Marc Cooper was a translator for President Salvador Allende at the time of the Chilean coup in 1973.

Marc Cooper was a translator for President Salvador Allende at the time of the Chilean coup in 1973. His journalism has appeared in publications that include the New Yorker, Harper’s and Rolling Stone.

I saw Marc Cooper at a reading in Portland and was very taken by his talk on Chile and human rights, especially his reflections on the recovery of historical memory. I bought Pinochet and Me and wound up reading it one sitting

I saw Marc Cooper at a reading in Portland and was very taken by his talk on Chile and human rights, especially his reflections on the recovery of historical memory. I bought Pinochet and Me and wound up reading it one sitting. I was emotionally moved and felt ashamed for what my country did to Chile and its people.

Award-winning journalist Marc Cooper was a translator to President Allende until the coup of 1973

Award-winning journalist Marc Cooper was a translator to President Allende until the coup of 1973. In this reflection on Chile and the role it has played in his life, he reconstructs the tense atmosphere of the final days of the Allende government, including his hiding and subsequent evacuation under armed UN protection. The earthshaking news of October 1998 that General Pinochet had been arrested in Britain unleashed two years of international interest in the case and its ramifications for traveling tyrants the world over.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Pinochet and Me book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti-Memoir as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Cooper has published three books: Roll Over Che Guevara: Travels of a Radical Reporter (1994), an anthology of his journalistic pieces,Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti Memoir . Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti-Memoir. Verso, 2001, p. 39. ^ What's Mumia Got to Do With It?

Cooper has published three books: Roll Over Che Guevara: Travels of a Radical Reporter (1994), an anthology of his journalistic pieces,Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti Memoir (2001) which was an . Times best-seller, and The Last Honest Place in America: Paradise and Perdition in the New Las Vegas (2004). Marc Cooper's Web site and blog. Biography at The Nation.

Marc Cooper was a translator working for the Chilean President when Allende was overthrown by Augusto Pinochet in 1973. in this brief, compelling memoir he recalls his escape from the tightening grip of the junta and his subsequent return visits to a country that is still groping towards democratic recovery.

Pinochet and Me. A Chilean Anti-Memoir. Award-winning journalist Marc Cooper was a translator to President Allende until the coup of 1973. This book brings to life the compelling human history buried under three decades of official stories and distortions.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti-memoir by Marc . Marc Cooper was a translator working for the Chilean President when Allende was overthrown by Augusto Pichet in 1973

Marc Cooper was a translator working for the Chilean President when Allende was overthrown by Augusto Pichet in 1973.

The earthshaking news of October 1998 that General Pinochet had been arrested in Britain unleashed two years of international interest in the case and its ramifications for traveling tyrants the world over. But even after the General’s return home, the media has ignored the more important story of how his detention lifted a stranglehold that had suffocated Chile’s moral sensibility for a generation.Award-winning journalist Marc Cooper was a translator to President Allende until the coup of 1973. In this reflection on Chile and the role it has played in his life, he reconstructs the tense atmosphere of the final days of the Allende government, including his hiding and subsequent evacuation under armed UN protection. Twenty-five years later he returns and recounts, in vivid street-level reporting, a country that is a democracy in name only and a society that has been transfigured by one of the most radical, armed capitalist revolutions of our time. Yet, he argues, spasms of protest that seemed like the last rattle of the snake may still presage the crumbling of Chile’s status quo as its people emerge from the long night of reaction to the cry of ‘Adios General!’

Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti-Memoir epub download

ISBN13: 978-1859847855

ISBN: 1859847854

Author: Marc Cooper

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Verso; First Edition edition (December 2000)

Pages: 144 pages

ePUB size: 1920 kb

FB2 size: 1840 kb

Rating: 4.5

Votes: 305

Other Formats: txt mobi mbr rtf

Related to Pinochet and Me: A Chilean Anti-Memoir ePub books

Yananoc
Pity the poor Chilean who had this government foisted upon by the United States. No wonder many people worldwide see the US as the devil republic. A great book showing the cruelty of a military government and the price paid by Chile when a legitimate elected government was overthrown by American imperialism. Sound familiar?
Yananoc
Pity the poor Chilean who had this government foisted upon by the United States. No wonder many people worldwide see the US as the devil republic. A great book showing the cruelty of a military government and the price paid by Chile when a legitimate elected government was overthrown by American imperialism. Sound familiar?
Fenius
good price, fast delivery
Fenius
good price, fast delivery
Bulace
First of all, the book isn't leftist trash as some reviewers claim. It points to the rampant human rights abuses and severe income inequality under Pinochet. Pointing that out isn't biased, unless of course those things didn't actually happen (which they most certainly did).

Some of these reviewers try to paint Allende as some sort of tyrant, which he was not. He alienated the upper and middle classes, and the conservative countryside, no doubt, but in favor of the working class and poor people (who consist of the majority in any society).
The thing is, hurting the middle and upper classes does not really endanger their survival, even if it undoubtedly hurts them some way financially. But they more or less stay afloat.
The lower classes, as always, do bear the brunt of any economic changes. Under Pinochet, as the book explains, the income inequality skyrockets, welfare is slashed, and people are forced to fend for themselves and sell their social security funds (which were not high enough for retirement) for credit.
Allende's reforms would have helped the people most in need, even if it alienated the oligarchy and middle classes, which I think is a worthy price for radical welfare change. A bold statement I know, but much preferred over the despotic Pinochet regime. Allende looks like a dove in comparison.

The economic and infrastructure upgrades from Pinochet may seem like a good thing, but economic output is not a good predictor of the standard of living. It doesn't take into account enormous income inequality. Take a look at the United States, the largest economy in the world. Its enormous income inequality is no secret, nor the fact that a great deal are working class or poor. Europe borrows from socialist principles of welfare and better income equality, but they are not in any way "fascist" or "totalitarian".

And before you call me a things like "Maoist" or "Stalinist" or the like, let me say that's drawing an egregious false equivalence between actual Communist monsters and their Latin American counterparts. Such claims are unworthy of scholarship.

However, you can certainly argue that neither far left nor right-wing governments will work. No far left one, because they eventually get overthrown by the oligarchy, who have real power. And not a right-wing dictatorship for obvious reasons.

The only system that will work is one that helps everyone. Yet I have no idea how it's gonna happen or if even possible.
Bulace
First of all, the book isn't leftist trash as some reviewers claim. It points to the rampant human rights abuses and severe income inequality under Pinochet. Pointing that out isn't biased, unless of course those things didn't actually happen (which they most certainly did).

Some of these reviewers try to paint Allende as some sort of tyrant, which he was not. He alienated the upper and middle classes, and the conservative countryside, no doubt, but in favor of the working class and poor people (who consist of the majority in any society).
The thing is, hurting the middle and upper classes does not really endanger their survival, even if it undoubtedly hurts them some way financially. But they more or less stay afloat.
The lower classes, as always, do bear the brunt of any economic changes. Under Pinochet, as the book explains, the income inequality skyrockets, welfare is slashed, and people are forced to fend for themselves and sell their social security funds (which were not high enough for retirement) for credit.
Allende's reforms would have helped the people most in need, even if it alienated the oligarchy and middle classes, which I think is a worthy price for radical welfare change. A bold statement I know, but much preferred over the despotic Pinochet regime. Allende looks like a dove in comparison.

The economic and infrastructure upgrades from Pinochet may seem like a good thing, but economic output is not a good predictor of the standard of living. It doesn't take into account enormous income inequality. Take a look at the United States, the largest economy in the world. Its enormous income inequality is no secret, nor the fact that a great deal are working class or poor. Europe borrows from socialist principles of welfare and better income equality, but they are not in any way "fascist" or "totalitarian".

And before you call me a things like "Maoist" or "Stalinist" or the like, let me say that's drawing an egregious false equivalence between actual Communist monsters and their Latin American counterparts. Such claims are unworthy of scholarship.

However, you can certainly argue that neither far left nor right-wing governments will work. No far left one, because they eventually get overthrown by the oligarchy, who have real power. And not a right-wing dictatorship for obvious reasons.

The only system that will work is one that helps everyone. Yet I have no idea how it's gonna happen or if even possible.
Itiannta
I had to read this for a class and all I can say is is was intense. This was my first go at literature about Latin America and I learned so much about Chile and US intervention in Latin American politics, installation of dictators, etc. It is definitely written like the author is telling you his personal story, which he is, but it's a pretty quick read and I can promise if you are paying attention you will fully process the message he is conveying.
Itiannta
I had to read this for a class and all I can say is is was intense. This was my first go at literature about Latin America and I learned so much about Chile and US intervention in Latin American politics, installation of dictators, etc. It is definitely written like the author is telling you his personal story, which he is, but it's a pretty quick read and I can promise if you are paying attention you will fully process the message he is conveying.
Onetarieva
Marc Cooper, contributing editor to that fine periodical The Nation, was twenty years old when he arrived in Chile in 1971 after being kicked out of the California higher education system by govenor Ronald Reagan for his anti-war activities. At the time of the September 11 1973 coup he was a translator for president Allende. This book is made up of notes he made while living in Chile an in visits to it since. It is very well written.
When he arrived in Chile, Nixon had ordered "make the economy scream," CIA money began pouring into opposition media outlets, parlimentarians, far right organizations and military officers, general Rene Schneider had been assasinated and so on. But Allende had the support of the poor majority and his party won handily congressional elections in March 1973. Bands of peasants, impatient that the opposition controlled congress was blocking land reform, took to seizing estates and dividing them amongst themselves. When the military attempted a coup in late June 1973, Allende urged workers to seize control of their workplaces which they did, to the consternation of the communist party, always among the most horrified whenever genuine socialism emerges (as they were during the civil war in Spain). About a week before the coup, a half a million workers took to the streets in support of Allende. But the U.S. backed military had the guns and they acted.
Over the next seventeen years, Chileans experienced massive terror. After ten years of neoliberal economics, the economy was on the verge of collapse in 1983, eliciting severe unrest from virtually all of Chile's classes and terrorism in response, particularly against the poor, from Pinochet. It is true that since 1986, with the exception of workers wages being well below what they were during Allende's time, a massive upward redistribution of wealth and half of the private social security accounts having less that a thousand dollars in them, Chile's economy has shown some nice statistics. But what is most remarkable is the utter alienation that most Chileans feel towards their political system. Relatively few people belong to a union, a church or any organization; everyone is an individualist fighting for themselves. People don't march for a living wage or free milk anymore; a more likely scene is that described by Cooper, of social security workers protesting very modest government attempts to prevent corruption in the way they earn their commissions. People are more likely to be concentrating on putting a toy phone to their ear while in their cars so that their neighbors will think they can afford a cell phone; or putting expensive times in their shopping carts to impress items in fellow shoppers and then discading them quickly before they leave.
But Cooper sees some hope in the arrest of Pinochet and his cronies, the reemergence of the previously almost dead Chilean left wing and the small steps Chile has taken towards a sort of "denazification" process.
Onetarieva
Marc Cooper, contributing editor to that fine periodical The Nation, was twenty years old when he arrived in Chile in 1971 after being kicked out of the California higher education system by govenor Ronald Reagan for his anti-war activities. At the time of the September 11 1973 coup he was a translator for president Allende. This book is made up of notes he made while living in Chile an in visits to it since. It is very well written.
When he arrived in Chile, Nixon had ordered "make the economy scream," CIA money began pouring into opposition media outlets, parlimentarians, far right organizations and military officers, general Rene Schneider had been assasinated and so on. But Allende had the support of the poor majority and his party won handily congressional elections in March 1973. Bands of peasants, impatient that the opposition controlled congress was blocking land reform, took to seizing estates and dividing them amongst themselves. When the military attempted a coup in late June 1973, Allende urged workers to seize control of their workplaces which they did, to the consternation of the communist party, always among the most horrified whenever genuine socialism emerges (as they were during the civil war in Spain). About a week before the coup, a half a million workers took to the streets in support of Allende. But the U.S. backed military had the guns and they acted.
Over the next seventeen years, Chileans experienced massive terror. After ten years of neoliberal economics, the economy was on the verge of collapse in 1983, eliciting severe unrest from virtually all of Chile's classes and terrorism in response, particularly against the poor, from Pinochet. It is true that since 1986, with the exception of workers wages being well below what they were during Allende's time, a massive upward redistribution of wealth and half of the private social security accounts having less that a thousand dollars in them, Chile's economy has shown some nice statistics. But what is most remarkable is the utter alienation that most Chileans feel towards their political system. Relatively few people belong to a union, a church or any organization; everyone is an individualist fighting for themselves. People don't march for a living wage or free milk anymore; a more likely scene is that described by Cooper, of social security workers protesting very modest government attempts to prevent corruption in the way they earn their commissions. People are more likely to be concentrating on putting a toy phone to their ear while in their cars so that their neighbors will think they can afford a cell phone; or putting expensive times in their shopping carts to impress items in fellow shoppers and then discading them quickly before they leave.
But Cooper sees some hope in the arrest of Pinochet and his cronies, the reemergence of the previously almost dead Chilean left wing and the small steps Chile has taken towards a sort of "denazification" process.
Sarin
I am unusually critical of critical of books written about Chile by Americans, but Marc Cooper's account is perfect. I lived in Chile, before and after the Allende Government and the Coup, and often find I read these books grumbling about how they authors don't really know what they are writing about. Things aren't right. But not this book. This time I found myself reading and, sometimes, crying, but still feeling a kinship with the author and somehow heartened that the tragedies he portrays have not been entirely forgotten.
Sarin
I am unusually critical of critical of books written about Chile by Americans, but Marc Cooper's account is perfect. I lived in Chile, before and after the Allende Government and the Coup, and often find I read these books grumbling about how they authors don't really know what they are writing about. Things aren't right. But not this book. This time I found myself reading and, sometimes, crying, but still feeling a kinship with the author and somehow heartened that the tragedies he portrays have not been entirely forgotten.
Otrytrerl
Not content to praise all persons and polices associated with a liberal agenda, Cooper has to throw his ridiculous sentiments worldwide. Essentially Margaret Thatcher gets thrown under the same bus as Pinochet. No pretense of objectivity in Cooper's "reporting".
Otrytrerl
Not content to praise all persons and polices associated with a liberal agenda, Cooper has to throw his ridiculous sentiments worldwide. Essentially Margaret Thatcher gets thrown under the same bus as Pinochet. No pretense of objectivity in Cooper's "reporting".