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The 4000 Footers of the White Mountains: A Guide and History epub download

by Steven D. Smith,Mike Dickerman


Mike Dickerman is an award-winning outdoors writer and author or co-author of eight books on White Mountain hiking . The introduction gives a history of the AMC's 4000-footer Club, White Mountain history, geology, flora and fauna, and very sensible hiking advice.

Mike Dickerman is an award-winning outdoors writer and author or co-author of eight books on White Mountain hiking and history. As close to "civilization" and unimpressive in altitude as they are compared to mountains elsewhere in the world, the trails are steep and rough and the weather harsh and unpredictable.

The 4000 Footers of t. .Professor Steven D Smith is the Warren Distinguished Professor of Law at San Diego University, and is the Co-Executive Director for both the Institute of Law and Religion, and the Institute for Law and Philosophy. He teaches in the area of law and religion, including as visiting professor at the University of Michigan and the University of Virginia.

Paperback – July 1, 2001. by Steven D. Smith (Author), Mike Dickerman (Author). Paperback: 300 pages. ISBN-13: 978-1931271011.

The Randolph Mountain Club (RMC) maintains the trails and several huts and shelters high on Mount Adams' . The 4000-Footers of the White Mountains: A Guide and History (2001) by Steven D. Smith and Mike Dickerman. Taylor, Bethany (Fall 2011).

The Randolph Mountain Club (RMC) maintains the trails and several huts and shelters high on Mount Adams' north side, including "The Perch", "Crag Camp", "The Log Cabin", and "Gray Knob". A large network of hiking and climbing paths lead south to the huts and ridges from several parking areas located on .

Smith, Steven . Dickerman, Mike (2017). Littleton, New Hampshire: Bondcliff Books. ISBN 978-1-931271-24-0.

Dickerman, Mike, Smith, Steven . a wealth of information. everything you need to know. if you& going hiking in the white mts.,you should have this book.

Dickerman, Mike, Smith, Steven D. ISBN-13. pbrain, November 24, 2013.

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Author bio. Table of contents. ISBN13: 9781931271011. Shop Us With Confidence. Expertly curated help for 4000-Footers of the White Mountains: A Guide and History. Plus easy-to-understand solutions written by experts for thousands of other textbooks.

Winter hiking anywhere in the White Mountains requires specialized equipment and skills, as severe . Mount Washington web page.

Winter hiking anywhere in the White Mountains requires specialized equipment and skills, as severe storms can develop suddenly. High winds and low temperatures can combine to make winter conditions on Mount Adams approximately equal to the worst reported from Antarctica. There are numerous direct routes to the summit of Mount Adams.

Find nearly any book by Mike Dickerman. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Smith, Mike Dickerman. The 4000-Footers of the White Mountains. ISBN 9781931271240 (978-1-931271-24-0) Softcover, Bondcliff Books, 2008. Find signed collectible books: 'The 4000-Footers of the White Mountains'.

By Steven D. Detailed descriptions of the trail approaches to the summits. Thorough geographical descriptions of the mountains and their surrounding terrain. Historical highlights of the mountains, presented in an easy-to-read timeline. Paperback; 300 pages. Measures . x . inches. A useful view guide, describing what can be seen from each of the summits. From Bondcliff Books. Want it cheaper? Set your own price.

The first comprehensive guide and history to New Hampshire 48 peaks with an elevation of 4000 feet or greater. Geared toward both the "peakbagging" hiker and the casual explorers of the higher summits of New England's most famous mountain rnge, the guide include detailed trail descriptions, historical timelines for each mountain, thorough geographical descriptions, and useful hints on winter climbing the 4000-Footers.

The 4000 Footers of the White Mountains: A Guide and History epub download

ISBN13: 978-1931271011

ISBN: 1931271011

Author: Steven D. Smith,Mike Dickerman

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Bondcliff Books; Revised edition (July 1, 2001)

Pages: 300 pages

ePUB size: 1552 kb

FB2 size: 1987 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 981

Other Formats: docx lrf rtf mbr

Related to The 4000 Footers of the White Mountains: A Guide and History ePub books

Olma
Love this book! Especially the list in the back to keep track of when you complete each peak!
Olma
Love this book! Especially the list in the back to keep track of when you complete each peak!
Bolv
If you want to join the 6000-plus souls who have climbed all 48 peaks in New Hampshire's White Mountains that exceed 4000 feet in height, this is the guidebook for you.

The writing is clear and intelligent and the information is authoritative, as is to be expected, given the qualifications of the authors. Steve Smith is co-editor of the AMC White Mountain Guide

AMC White Mountain Guide, 28th: Hiking trails in the White Mountain National Forest (Appalachian Mountain Club White Mountain Guide)

and proprietor of The Mountain Wanderer bookstore, located in Lincoln, NH, at the west end of the Kancamagus Highway, and Mike Dickerman is a member of the AMC's 4000-footer Committee. Both have written numerous books and articles on hiking in New England.

The introduction gives a history of the AMC's 4000-footer Club, White Mountain history, geology, flora and fauna, and very sensible hiking advice. The comments on trail stewardship are especially pertinent because of the heavy use the White Mountain trails receive. As close to "civilization" and unimpressive in altitude as they are compared to mountains elsewhere in the world, the trails are steep and rough and the weather harsh and unpredictable. It's remarkably easy to get lost, injured, or hypothermic any time of year in the Whites, even for experienced hikers.

The main section of the guide is composed of a description of the peaks, organized by range and region. I found this very helpful when doing my hikes. It's also very informative. Hiking the peaks on each side of the Pinkham, Crawford, and Franconia Notches in sequence, for example, gives one a unique appreciation of the complicated geography of the Whites. For each peak there is a detailed description of its geography, nomenclature, historical highlights, the various trail approaches with time, distance, elevation, trail head locations, winter approaches, and a view guide.

The appendices are most interesting, especially the "4000-footer Feats and Oddities", including the "Diretissima" of Rev. Henry Folsom, who plotted out and hiked the shortest continuous route for climbing all the peaks and did it in 19 days and 244.05 miles; Gene Daniell's climbs of each peak in each month of the year; and Mike Bromberg's standing on top of each peak at midnight in winter. Then there are the speed records: "Cave Dog" Keizer' August, 2002, 3 days, 17 hours, 21 minutes, (since broken by Tim Seaver in July, 2003, by almost two hours). Most awe-inspiring of all is Guy Waterman's winter ascent of each peak from the four cardinal points of the compass.

The book closes with a checklist of the peaks and a list of references for further reading. My favorite is the Watermans' "Forest and Crag"

Forest and Crag, A History of Hiking, Trail Blazing, and

a history of northeastern hiking. A book not on the list which I highly recommend is Laura Waterman's touching memoir "Losing the Garden"

Losing the Garden: The Story of a Marriage

which gives us a more personal view of Guy Waterman.

Information about the application for the 4000-footer Club can be obtained at the committee's official website - [...]

Once you have climbed all the peaks, you submit your list to the committee along with an essay or a trip report of one climb and a modest fee, and in return you get a patch and a certificate, as well as an untold amount of personal satisfaction.

Hiking the New Hampshire 4000-footers has been great fun, made me a much better hiker, and helped me find my place in the universe. I wouldn't have been able to do it without Steve and Mike's guide. Many thanks to them, and happy trails!
Bolv
If you want to join the 6000-plus souls who have climbed all 48 peaks in New Hampshire's White Mountains that exceed 4000 feet in height, this is the guidebook for you.

The writing is clear and intelligent and the information is authoritative, as is to be expected, given the qualifications of the authors. Steve Smith is co-editor of the AMC White Mountain Guide

AMC White Mountain Guide, 28th: Hiking trails in the White Mountain National Forest (Appalachian Mountain Club White Mountain Guide)

and proprietor of The Mountain Wanderer bookstore, located in Lincoln, NH, at the west end of the Kancamagus Highway, and Mike Dickerman is a member of the AMC's 4000-footer Committee. Both have written numerous books and articles on hiking in New England.

The introduction gives a history of the AMC's 4000-footer Club, White Mountain history, geology, flora and fauna, and very sensible hiking advice. The comments on trail stewardship are especially pertinent because of the heavy use the White Mountain trails receive. As close to "civilization" and unimpressive in altitude as they are compared to mountains elsewhere in the world, the trails are steep and rough and the weather harsh and unpredictable. It's remarkably easy to get lost, injured, or hypothermic any time of year in the Whites, even for experienced hikers.

The main section of the guide is composed of a description of the peaks, organized by range and region. I found this very helpful when doing my hikes. It's also very informative. Hiking the peaks on each side of the Pinkham, Crawford, and Franconia Notches in sequence, for example, gives one a unique appreciation of the complicated geography of the Whites. For each peak there is a detailed description of its geography, nomenclature, historical highlights, the various trail approaches with time, distance, elevation, trail head locations, winter approaches, and a view guide.

The appendices are most interesting, especially the "4000-footer Feats and Oddities", including the "Diretissima" of Rev. Henry Folsom, who plotted out and hiked the shortest continuous route for climbing all the peaks and did it in 19 days and 244.05 miles; Gene Daniell's climbs of each peak in each month of the year; and Mike Bromberg's standing on top of each peak at midnight in winter. Then there are the speed records: "Cave Dog" Keizer' August, 2002, 3 days, 17 hours, 21 minutes, (since broken by Tim Seaver in July, 2003, by almost two hours). Most awe-inspiring of all is Guy Waterman's winter ascent of each peak from the four cardinal points of the compass.

The book closes with a checklist of the peaks and a list of references for further reading. My favorite is the Watermans' "Forest and Crag"

Forest and Crag, A History of Hiking, Trail Blazing, and

a history of northeastern hiking. A book not on the list which I highly recommend is Laura Waterman's touching memoir "Losing the Garden"

Losing the Garden: The Story of a Marriage

which gives us a more personal view of Guy Waterman.

Information about the application for the 4000-footer Club can be obtained at the committee's official website - [...]

Once you have climbed all the peaks, you submit your list to the committee along with an essay or a trip report of one climb and a modest fee, and in return you get a patch and a certificate, as well as an untold amount of personal satisfaction.

Hiking the New Hampshire 4000-footers has been great fun, made me a much better hiker, and helped me find my place in the universe. I wouldn't have been able to do it without Steve and Mike's guide. Many thanks to them, and happy trails!