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Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston, 1870-1900, Second Edition (Joint Centre for Urban Study) epub download

by Sam Bass Warner Jr.


Streetcar Suburbs book. Detailed study of Boston's growth pattern, 1870-1900.

Streetcar Suburbs book. This book is straight forward: Warner describes the process of suburbanization between 1870-1900 in Boston, Mass. Warner is focusing on a period of time that most contemporary American's would not equate with the process of "suburbanization", but it is this very approach that makes "Street Car Suburbs" so interesting. Originally written in the 1960s and revised in 1978 the book has that 1970s social scientific feel to it.

This 208-page paperback is the work of Sam Bass Warner, J. Visiting Professor of Urban History, at MIT. The book examines the development of the suburbs around Boston in the age when streetcars extended the range of workers to abt 6 miles. Before the streetcar, workers had to live within abt 3 miles of work. Warner in this book does a great job of explaining of how streetcars allowed the development of Boston to unfold.

Mobile version (beta). Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston, 1870-1900.

In the last third of the nineteenth century the American city grew from a crowded merchant town, in which neatly everybody walked to work, to the modern divided metropolis

In the last third of the nineteenth century the American city grew from a crowded merchant town, in which neatly everybody walked to work, to the modern divided metropolis. The street railway created this division of the metropolis into an inner city of commerce and slums and an outer city of commuters' suburbs. This book tells who built the new city, and why, and how. Год: 1978.

Warner, Sam Bass, 1928-. Suburbs and environs. Cambridge, Harvard University Press. - - Suburbs and environs.

In the last third of the 19th century Boston grew from a crowded merchant town .

In the last third of the 19th century Boston grew from a crowded merchant town, in which nearly everybody walked to work, to a modern divided metropolis. The street railway created this division of the metropolis into an inner city of commerce and slums and an outer city of commuter suburbs.

See all 4 brand new listings. In the last third of the 19th century Boston grew from a crowded merchant town, in which nearly everybody walked to work, to a modern divided metropolis. Product Identifiers.

author: Sam Bass Warner (American, 1928 . Books, Streetcars, Suburbs, Urban planning, Boston (Mass. Urban transportation, Land use, Urban, City planning, Maps, Railroads, Boston Suburbs - Chapter 2 - 1865-1910. Boston Suburbs Project The Boston Suburbs Project represents a visual documentation of 38 Boston area neighborhoods that exemplify suburban development in America.

book by Sam Bass Warner, J. .While it uses Boston as a case study, you can apply the same ideas in hundreds of cities and see how the same thing happened. Streetcars were the boom/bust speculative industry of their era, just as "dot-bombs" were the boom/bust of the recent era.

This award-winning book charts the unfolding, from the. Noticeable wear to cover and pages.

In the last third of the nineteenth century the American city grew from a crowded merchant town, in which neatly everybody walked to work, to the modern divided metropolis. The street railway created this division of the metropolis into an inner city of commerce and slums and an outer city of commuters' suburbs. This book tells who built the new city, and why, and how.

Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston, 1870-1900, Second Edition (Joint Centre for Urban Study) epub download

ISBN13: 978-0674842106

ISBN: 0674842103

Author: Sam Bass Warner Jr.

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: Harvard University Press; 2nd ed. edition (January 1, 1962)

Pages: 236 pages

ePUB size: 1502 kb

FB2 size: 1199 kb

Rating: 4.7

Votes: 804

Other Formats: mbr docx azw mobi

Related to Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston, 1870-1900, Second Edition (Joint Centre for Urban Study) ePub books

Bludsong
“Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston (1870-1900),” by Sam Bass Warner, Jr., Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1978, second edition. This 208-page paperback is the work of Sam Bass Warner, Jr., Visiting Professor of Urban History, at MIT. The book examines the development of the suburbs around Boston in the age when streetcars extended the range of workers to abt 6 miles. Before the streetcar, workers had to live within abt 3 miles of work. As most jobs were close to the waterfront, that caused population to concentrate in a small area resulting in the congestion, noise, smells, and disease that characterized cities.

Upper class could afford to live outside the city in country estates often with townhouses in the city for occasional visits for business or to maintain urban contacts. Similarly railroads, in that era called “steam railroads” to differentiate them from “street railroads,” had infrequent stations but allowed the upper classes to commute by train. Middle and working classes also sought the benefits of the suburbs. Horse drawn streetcars and later electric streetcars extended their range and made that possible.

The book does not discuss the technology that made this possible. Thomas Edison began investigating electric streetcars early on. The cause was probably the Great Epizootic, an episode of equine influenza the attacked the US horse population in 1872. Thousands of horses sickened and died in an era when much commerce and transportation depended on horses. Edison's co-worker, Frank Sprague invented the successful electric streetcar mechanism in 1887. Horse drawn streetcars began in Boston in abt 1852.

In the fifty years from 1850 to 1900, Boston changed from a merchant city to a commercial/industrial metropolis. In the process middle and upper classes moved to the fringes of the city, while the lower classes stayed in the inner city. Immigrants tended to begin in the inner city and then as they adapted and climbed the economic ladder–usually through hard work, thrift, and education often over two or three generations, they too moved to the suburbs.

Suburban streetcar lines followed a characteristic pattern. Pioneer lines had infrequent service while houses gradually were built close to the lines. As the population grew frequency increased to “linear service,” ie a car every ten minutes. Finally, as the land filled, crosstown connections were added. Crosstown lines usually meant longer commutes and service to lower classes. Shorter commutes made the land more valuable, and hence attracted upper middle class residents. Suburbs became stratified by class.

Other factors contributed to stratification. Families tended to seek out areas were neighbors had similar incomes and backgrounds. Many developers and builders repeated successful designs where possible once they were identified. This caused similar lot sizes, styles and architecture throughout the area built in a given era. Speculative builders were especially conservative in their choices preferring well accepted styles.

Warner examines low cost houses built by Robert Treat Paine for the lower middle class. His first effort was brick row houses of 600 to 800 sq ft. They were small and unsuccessful. Those that have survived became slum dwellings. A second group of detached houses of abt twice the size were more successful. They have been maintained because they are the best choice in the area.

Houses in this era were sold with mortgages. The typical one was a balloon mortgage with a term of three to eight years at an interest rate of 5 to 6%. At the end of the term, the buyer had to refinance to make the balloon payment. Covenants were common in deeds. Often residential property was restricted to single family homes and three family or multiple family dwellings were proscribed. Similarly covenants often prevented saloons, livery stables, and factories.

In the 19th Century, Sunday streetcar trips to amusement parks, cemeteries, or family recreation sites was a common activity. Locations were often at the end of the line making Sunday service profitable.

In some areas streetcar companies or their executives were known to extend streetcar lines into areas where they owned the land, and then profit from the sale of lots. That aspect is not discussed in the present volume. Similarly streetcar lines were known to build amusement parks to attract off-peak riders. Finally, the book makes no mention of heating systems used in these houses. The photos show central chimneys, which are characteristic of coal fired heating systems. In this era, central heating would probably be steam heat. Otherwise homes were heated with coal stoves.

This book is a classic on the subject. Warner's background suggests this is urban history, but one could call it urban planning or sociology. In urban developments, people vote with their feet and tend to group and stratify. This book makes clear that transportation and commuter time are major influences for those who work for a paycheck. It examines numerous other factors to the extent available records allow. It's an informative read. Appendices discuss sources and provide population data. Photographs. References. Bibliography. Index.

Related books:
“Electrifying America: Social Meanings of a New Technology, 1880-1940” by David E. Nye, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1990.
“Home Fires Burning: The History of Domestic Heating and Cooking,” by Lawrence Wright, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1964.
Bludsong
“Streetcar Suburbs: The Process of Growth in Boston (1870-1900),” by Sam Bass Warner, Jr., Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1978, second edition. This 208-page paperback is the work of Sam Bass Warner, Jr., Visiting Professor of Urban History, at MIT. The book examines the development of the suburbs around Boston in the age when streetcars extended the range of workers to abt 6 miles. Before the streetcar, workers had to live within abt 3 miles of work. As most jobs were close to the waterfront, that caused population to concentrate in a small area resulting in the congestion, noise, smells, and disease that characterized cities.

Upper class could afford to live outside the city in country estates often with townhouses in the city for occasional visits for business or to maintain urban contacts. Similarly railroads, in that era called “steam railroads” to differentiate them from “street railroads,” had infrequent stations but allowed the upper classes to commute by train. Middle and working classes also sought the benefits of the suburbs. Horse drawn streetcars and later electric streetcars extended their range and made that possible.

The book does not discuss the technology that made this possible. Thomas Edison began investigating electric streetcars early on. The cause was probably the Great Epizootic, an episode of equine influenza the attacked the US horse population in 1872. Thousands of horses sickened and died in an era when much commerce and transportation depended on horses. Edison's co-worker, Frank Sprague invented the successful electric streetcar mechanism in 1887. Horse drawn streetcars began in Boston in abt 1852.

In the fifty years from 1850 to 1900, Boston changed from a merchant city to a commercial/industrial metropolis. In the process middle and upper classes moved to the fringes of the city, while the lower classes stayed in the inner city. Immigrants tended to begin in the inner city and then as they adapted and climbed the economic ladder–usually through hard work, thrift, and education often over two or three generations, they too moved to the suburbs.

Suburban streetcar lines followed a characteristic pattern. Pioneer lines had infrequent service while houses gradually were built close to the lines. As the population grew frequency increased to “linear service,” ie a car every ten minutes. Finally, as the land filled, crosstown connections were added. Crosstown lines usually meant longer commutes and service to lower classes. Shorter commutes made the land more valuable, and hence attracted upper middle class residents. Suburbs became stratified by class.

Other factors contributed to stratification. Families tended to seek out areas were neighbors had similar incomes and backgrounds. Many developers and builders repeated successful designs where possible once they were identified. This caused similar lot sizes, styles and architecture throughout the area built in a given era. Speculative builders were especially conservative in their choices preferring well accepted styles.

Warner examines low cost houses built by Robert Treat Paine for the lower middle class. His first effort was brick row houses of 600 to 800 sq ft. They were small and unsuccessful. Those that have survived became slum dwellings. A second group of detached houses of abt twice the size were more successful. They have been maintained because they are the best choice in the area.

Houses in this era were sold with mortgages. The typical one was a balloon mortgage with a term of three to eight years at an interest rate of 5 to 6%. At the end of the term, the buyer had to refinance to make the balloon payment. Covenants were common in deeds. Often residential property was restricted to single family homes and three family or multiple family dwellings were proscribed. Similarly covenants often prevented saloons, livery stables, and factories.

In the 19th Century, Sunday streetcar trips to amusement parks, cemeteries, or family recreation sites was a common activity. Locations were often at the end of the line making Sunday service profitable.

In some areas streetcar companies or their executives were known to extend streetcar lines into areas where they owned the land, and then profit from the sale of lots. That aspect is not discussed in the present volume. Similarly streetcar lines were known to build amusement parks to attract off-peak riders. Finally, the book makes no mention of heating systems used in these houses. The photos show central chimneys, which are characteristic of coal fired heating systems. In this era, central heating would probably be steam heat. Otherwise homes were heated with coal stoves.

This book is a classic on the subject. Warner's background suggests this is urban history, but one could call it urban planning or sociology. In urban developments, people vote with their feet and tend to group and stratify. This book makes clear that transportation and commuter time are major influences for those who work for a paycheck. It examines numerous other factors to the extent available records allow. It's an informative read. Appendices discuss sources and provide population data. Photographs. References. Bibliography. Index.

Related books:
“Electrifying America: Social Meanings of a New Technology, 1880-1940” by David E. Nye, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1990.
“Home Fires Burning: The History of Domestic Heating and Cooking,” by Lawrence Wright, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1964.
Leniga
This is a great book. Warner in this book does a great job of explaining of how streetcars allowed the development of Boston to unfold. The main thesis is that this form of mass transit allowed people to move away from the city and commute into work, but unlike before it was not only the wealthy who could accomplish this. Rather, it was the working class that could do this as well. The end result would be that the city would be built out and that the infastructure needed to maintain the city's vitality would follow as well. This would lead to the development of districts and bands of housing that would separate individuals from one another through residential segregation. The book is easily read and enjoyable in spite of its subject matter.
Leniga
This is a great book. Warner in this book does a great job of explaining of how streetcars allowed the development of Boston to unfold. The main thesis is that this form of mass transit allowed people to move away from the city and commute into work, but unlike before it was not only the wealthy who could accomplish this. Rather, it was the working class that could do this as well. The end result would be that the city would be built out and that the infastructure needed to maintain the city's vitality would follow as well. This would lead to the development of districts and bands of housing that would separate individuals from one another through residential segregation. The book is easily read and enjoyable in spite of its subject matter.
Agarus
Should have this admirably written, pioneering work, It is a fine study indeed. Its ramifications stretch far beyond its disciplinary specialism
Agarus
Should have this admirably written, pioneering work, It is a fine study indeed. Its ramifications stretch far beyond its disciplinary specialism
Dreladred
Streetcar Suburbs is a well-written book, for which there are only limited reasons to still read. It's not that this 1962 classic is dated -- though by today's standards it is oddly silent on issues of gender, a core concept of the newer histories of American suburbs -- but rather, many of its key ideas have become incorporated other works broader in scope, like Kenneth Jackson's Crabgrass Frontier, so the pay off is less than it would be if the book were read shortly after publication. (This is particularly true of Warner's observations of the effects of various nineteenth-century transportation improvements on the form of the city. One point, however, that Warner emphasizes that I don't recall reading elsewhere is the importance of crosstown streetcar lines in determining where growth occurred within suburbs and the nature it would take.)

People interested in the following points might still find this worth their time.

1. Those with a special interest in Boston. This book provides a very rich history, including many historical photographs of different styles of houses, of the outward spread of Boston across the second half of the nineteenth century. Occasionally, the detail is a bit hard to follow for those who are not familiar with Boston, but local history buffs will find this a goldmine.

2. Those interested in how cities grow and maintain order in the absence of zoning regulations. Much of the latter half of the book gives a very rich history of the suburbs grew in a way that was at once homogenous in smaller clumps but also very diverse but orderly from a God's eye view. Warner is able, in a small amount of space, to take into account class, transportation technology, economic risk, cultural values, architecture and geography to create a compelling account for the growth Boston experienced.

This book I could still see having a place in college history classes, either one on nineteenth-century US history or on the history of New England. I'm glad to see that there is a Kindle edition so that it won't go out of print.
Dreladred
Streetcar Suburbs is a well-written book, for which there are only limited reasons to still read. It's not that this 1962 classic is dated -- though by today's standards it is oddly silent on issues of gender, a core concept of the newer histories of American suburbs -- but rather, many of its key ideas have become incorporated other works broader in scope, like Kenneth Jackson's Crabgrass Frontier, so the pay off is less than it would be if the book were read shortly after publication. (This is particularly true of Warner's observations of the effects of various nineteenth-century transportation improvements on the form of the city. One point, however, that Warner emphasizes that I don't recall reading elsewhere is the importance of crosstown streetcar lines in determining where growth occurred within suburbs and the nature it would take.)

People interested in the following points might still find this worth their time.

1. Those with a special interest in Boston. This book provides a very rich history, including many historical photographs of different styles of houses, of the outward spread of Boston across the second half of the nineteenth century. Occasionally, the detail is a bit hard to follow for those who are not familiar with Boston, but local history buffs will find this a goldmine.

2. Those interested in how cities grow and maintain order in the absence of zoning regulations. Much of the latter half of the book gives a very rich history of the suburbs grew in a way that was at once homogenous in smaller clumps but also very diverse but orderly from a God's eye view. Warner is able, in a small amount of space, to take into account class, transportation technology, economic risk, cultural values, architecture and geography to create a compelling account for the growth Boston experienced.

This book I could still see having a place in college history classes, either one on nineteenth-century US history or on the history of New England. I'm glad to see that there is a Kindle edition so that it won't go out of print.