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Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864 (Civil War America) epub download

by Earl J. Hess


Earl J. Hess provides a narrative history of the use of cularly trenches and other .

Earl J. Hess provides a narrative history of the use of cularly trenches and other semi-permanent earthworks-used by Confederate an. .

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865, fought between the northern United States (loyal to the Union) and the southern United States (that had seceded from the Union and formed the .

The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865, fought between the northern United States (loyal to the Union) and the southern United States (that had seceded from the Union and formed the Confederacy). The civil war began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people.

Hess studies the use of fortifications by tracing the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia from April 1861 to April 1864. He considers the role of field fortifications in the defense of cities, river crossings, and railroads and in numerous battles. Blending technical aspects of construction with operational history, Hess demonstrates the crucial role these earthworks played in the success or failure of field armies

Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864 is one of the three books Hess has written surrounding field works in the Civil War. Others in the series are Trench Warfare Under Grant and Lee: Field Fortifications in the Overland Campaign and In the Trenches at Petersburg: Field Fortifications and Confederate Defeat. This book about the fortifications during the Eastern Campaigns is a great start to the series, however, as it brings to light certain things which have been ignored or only slightly mentioned in the annals of history.

Field Armies and Fortifications of the Civil War will find favor with those students of the war who want to look past .

Military History of the West. This volume covers the eastern theater through April 1864 and includes a good deal of information on the defenses of Washington and Richmond (which are more than just field fortifications). It also covers the battles of the Peninsula Campaign of 1862 where fortifications played a key role. Blending technical aspects of construction with operational history, Hess demonstrates the crucial role these earthworks played in the success or failure of field armies

Series: Civil War America. Responsibility for fortifications in the pre–Civil War army rested with the Corps of Engineers, the elite of the military establishment.

Series: Civil War America. Published by: University of North Carolina Press. Earl J. Hess provides a narrative history of the use of cularly trenches and other semi-permanent earthworks-used by Confederate and Union field armies at all major battle sites in the eastern theater of the Civil War. Hess moves beyond the technical aspects of construction to demonstrate the crucial role these earthworks played in the success or failure of field armies.

Field Fortifications in Campaign Warfare. With the large number of titles in . Civil War history released each year, it is increasingly difficult for a scholar of the war to break new ground. However, Earl J. Hess has done so in Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864. The first in several planned volumes on field fortifications, this book covers the Eastern campaigns from Big Bethel in June 1861 to the capture of Plymouth in April 1864. Hess looks at the use of field fortifications in various campaigns in the Eastern theater, focusing on how they.

Earl J. Hess provides a narrative history of the use of fortifications--particularly trenches and other semi-permanent earthworks--used by Confederate and Union field armies at all major battle sites in the eastern theater of the Civil War. Hess moves beyond the technical aspects of construction to demonstrate the crucial role these earthworks played in the success or failure of field armies. A comprehensive study which draws on research and fieldwork from 300 battle sites, Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War is an indispensable reference for Civil War buffs and historians.

Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864 (Civil War America) epub download

ISBN13: 978-1469609935

ISBN: 1469609932

Author: Earl J. Hess

Category: History

Subcategory: Americas

Language: English

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (August 1, 2013)

Pages: 448 pages

ePUB size: 1644 kb

FB2 size: 1158 kb

Rating: 4.2

Votes: 210

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Frosha
When analysis of Civil War battles usually takes place, there are works written about the infantry, cavalry and artillery and their tactical movements around the battlefield. But something rarely talked about are the fortifications and field works made by the armies in order to solidify the position of the armies both Union and Confederate. Earl J. Hess uses this work, Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War, to better explain the design, need and uses of the field works on the battlefields and the fortifications all around the coastline. This is the first in a series of books written on the field works during the Civil War.

Earl J. Hess is an associate professor of history at Lincoln Memorial University and has authored other works such as The Civil War in the West: Victory and Defeat from the Appalachians to the Mississippi and Pickett’s Charge – The Last Attack at Gettysburg. His book on Pickett’s Charge was the winner of the 2001 James I. Robertson Jr. Prize from the Civil War Library and Research Center.

Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864 is one of the three books Hess has written surrounding field works in the Civil War. Others in the series are Trench Warfare Under Grant and Lee: Field Fortifications in the Overland Campaign and In the Trenches at Petersburg: Field Fortifications and Confederate Defeat. This book about the fortifications during the Eastern Campaigns is a great start to the series, however, as it brings to light certain things which have been ignored or only slightly mentioned in the annals of history. What Hess does in this work is describe in great detail the way in which the field works were built on the field and the problems which the engineers on both sides faced during that endeavor. With the lack of engineers in the army, many times there would be infantrymen creating the field works. This would create works which were not exactly up to par and the men of the ranks would often complain or slowly work because of the hard labor of construction field works. Throughout the text are many examples through drawings, maps or pictures giving the reader a great idea as to what the fortifications looked like through the war. Many times, people tend to think of forts as completely created with stone and embattlements, but sometimes that was just not the case. For example, Hess talks about Federal Fort Sumner and along with his explanation is a picture of the fortification. There is little to the fort, mainly some wood and sandbags placed upon dug embattlements with the cannons placed onto it. This is something which some readers may not be aware of. Another detail which Hess mentions is the fact that at the beginning of the war, Washington only had one fort as part of the defense. If you look at a map of Washington after the war, the entire city is surrounded with forts some of which were quickly built to suppress Early’s attacks in 1864. These attacks are not mentioned in this book since Hess only takes us up to Bristoe Station and the Fall of Plymouth. He does this in order to deal with the field works and fortifications in the Overland and Petersburg in the coming volumes. Nevertheless, this is a welcome addition to any Civil War Library.

I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the Eastern Campaigns of the Civil War. It gives the readers a better idea of the time it took to create these fortifications and the effect which it had on the battlefield. This work also gives the reader an understanding of how few engineers there were during the beginning of the war and throughout the conflict and the way in which they had to find additional help. This would either end in success or failure and friction between commanders because of it. Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaign, 1861-8164 is a welcome addition to any Civil War library and to the academia of the conflict.

Matthew Bartlett - Author, Gettysburg Chronicle
Frosha
When analysis of Civil War battles usually takes place, there are works written about the infantry, cavalry and artillery and their tactical movements around the battlefield. But something rarely talked about are the fortifications and field works made by the armies in order to solidify the position of the armies both Union and Confederate. Earl J. Hess uses this work, Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War, to better explain the design, need and uses of the field works on the battlefields and the fortifications all around the coastline. This is the first in a series of books written on the field works during the Civil War.

Earl J. Hess is an associate professor of history at Lincoln Memorial University and has authored other works such as The Civil War in the West: Victory and Defeat from the Appalachians to the Mississippi and Pickett’s Charge – The Last Attack at Gettysburg. His book on Pickett’s Charge was the winner of the 2001 James I. Robertson Jr. Prize from the Civil War Library and Research Center.

Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaigns, 1861-1864 is one of the three books Hess has written surrounding field works in the Civil War. Others in the series are Trench Warfare Under Grant and Lee: Field Fortifications in the Overland Campaign and In the Trenches at Petersburg: Field Fortifications and Confederate Defeat. This book about the fortifications during the Eastern Campaigns is a great start to the series, however, as it brings to light certain things which have been ignored or only slightly mentioned in the annals of history. What Hess does in this work is describe in great detail the way in which the field works were built on the field and the problems which the engineers on both sides faced during that endeavor. With the lack of engineers in the army, many times there would be infantrymen creating the field works. This would create works which were not exactly up to par and the men of the ranks would often complain or slowly work because of the hard labor of construction field works. Throughout the text are many examples through drawings, maps or pictures giving the reader a great idea as to what the fortifications looked like through the war. Many times, people tend to think of forts as completely created with stone and embattlements, but sometimes that was just not the case. For example, Hess talks about Federal Fort Sumner and along with his explanation is a picture of the fortification. There is little to the fort, mainly some wood and sandbags placed upon dug embattlements with the cannons placed onto it. This is something which some readers may not be aware of. Another detail which Hess mentions is the fact that at the beginning of the war, Washington only had one fort as part of the defense. If you look at a map of Washington after the war, the entire city is surrounded with forts some of which were quickly built to suppress Early’s attacks in 1864. These attacks are not mentioned in this book since Hess only takes us up to Bristoe Station and the Fall of Plymouth. He does this in order to deal with the field works and fortifications in the Overland and Petersburg in the coming volumes. Nevertheless, this is a welcome addition to any Civil War Library.

I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the Eastern Campaigns of the Civil War. It gives the readers a better idea of the time it took to create these fortifications and the effect which it had on the battlefield. This work also gives the reader an understanding of how few engineers there were during the beginning of the war and throughout the conflict and the way in which they had to find additional help. This would either end in success or failure and friction between commanders because of it. Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War: The Eastern Campaign, 1861-8164 is a welcome addition to any Civil War library and to the academia of the conflict.

Matthew Bartlett - Author, Gettysburg Chronicle
Ferne
Dr. Hess has authored one of the most significant books in print on the use of field fortifications during the US Civil War and the relationship of these works to the actual campaigns. Although there are some other books that do include some of this information, including several excellent post-war sources from the 19th century, this book does a remarkable job of putting the subject in perspective. Many so called "Civil War" experts simply do not realize the significance of the role of field and permanent fortifications during many of the key campaigns of the war and reduce everything to simple terms stating "there were breastworks, etc..." They simply give no detail and the reader can not understand such details as why some of these "works" were easily overrun, why some railroad cuts made great defensive positions and others did not, or even why on Cemetary Ridge at Gettysburg the troops of II Corps could not entrench themselves.

Hess not only describes what the defenses consisted of, but also shows how they affected the campaign. He also includes background information as well as detailing the events related to the campaigns. The book does not rehash the old story of bullets and beans in these operations, instead with Hess we see its bullets, beans and spades.

The reader will soon notice this book does not cover all the operations of the Civil War where fortifications were involved, but that is because this is the first volume with two additional ones planned. The publisher did a good job in reproducing the photos. One serious flaw is a lack of maps for the reader to follow everything mentioned in the text. This usually results from the publisher attempting to save on production expenses and there is not much the author can do to correct it. On the other hand, any expert or buff will have other books available with the missing maps they need for folowing the text (the first volume of the old West Point Atlas of American Wars has just about every map you may need).

This volume covers the eastern theater through April 1864 and includes a good deal of information on the defenses of Washington and Richmond (which are more than just field fortifications). It also covers the battles of the Peninsula Campaign of 1862 where fortifications played a key role. The limited role of field fortifications in some of the campaigns of Northern Virginia are included as well as information on how work was done to protect Harrisburg and even far off Pittsburgh with fixed defenses against Lee's second invasion of the north.

This book is not intended for fast reading or skimming, but instead created for those who have a real interest in the Civil War and want to enjoy a good read.
Ferne
Dr. Hess has authored one of the most significant books in print on the use of field fortifications during the US Civil War and the relationship of these works to the actual campaigns. Although there are some other books that do include some of this information, including several excellent post-war sources from the 19th century, this book does a remarkable job of putting the subject in perspective. Many so called "Civil War" experts simply do not realize the significance of the role of field and permanent fortifications during many of the key campaigns of the war and reduce everything to simple terms stating "there were breastworks, etc..." They simply give no detail and the reader can not understand such details as why some of these "works" were easily overrun, why some railroad cuts made great defensive positions and others did not, or even why on Cemetary Ridge at Gettysburg the troops of II Corps could not entrench themselves.

Hess not only describes what the defenses consisted of, but also shows how they affected the campaign. He also includes background information as well as detailing the events related to the campaigns. The book does not rehash the old story of bullets and beans in these operations, instead with Hess we see its bullets, beans and spades.

The reader will soon notice this book does not cover all the operations of the Civil War where fortifications were involved, but that is because this is the first volume with two additional ones planned. The publisher did a good job in reproducing the photos. One serious flaw is a lack of maps for the reader to follow everything mentioned in the text. This usually results from the publisher attempting to save on production expenses and there is not much the author can do to correct it. On the other hand, any expert or buff will have other books available with the missing maps they need for folowing the text (the first volume of the old West Point Atlas of American Wars has just about every map you may need).

This volume covers the eastern theater through April 1864 and includes a good deal of information on the defenses of Washington and Richmond (which are more than just field fortifications). It also covers the battles of the Peninsula Campaign of 1862 where fortifications played a key role. The limited role of field fortifications in some of the campaigns of Northern Virginia are included as well as information on how work was done to protect Harrisburg and even far off Pittsburgh with fixed defenses against Lee's second invasion of the north.

This book is not intended for fast reading or skimming, but instead created for those who have a real interest in the Civil War and want to enjoy a good read.