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Healthy Women, Healthy Lives: A Guide to Preventing Disease, from the Landmark Nurses' Health Study epub download

by Susan E. Sc.D. Hankinson,Graham A. M.D. Colditz,JoAnn E. M.D. Manson,Frank E. M.D. Speizer


The Landmark Nurse Health Study was enormously interesting and full of useful information,as well as being clearly and understandably written for the layperson

The Landmark Nurse Health Study was enormously interesting and full of useful information,as well as being clearly and understandably written for the layperson. The authors enlisted the help of 170,000 nurses to track their health status over the past 25 years, by filling out questionnaires every few years, occasionally requesting blood samples and even nail clippings from some. This is a report on their work, which also cites many other studies, some that agree and others that disagree with the authors findings.

Healthy Women, Healthy Lives book. For twenty-five years, the Nurses' Health Study has followed more than 120,000 real women, leading real lives, to find what works - and what doesn't - to improve the health of women. Its findings over the years have resulted in hundreds of professional papers and newspaper headlines.

For example, the book Healthy Women and Healthy Lives was written by Hankson, Colditz, Manson, and Speizer to reflect results of the study Public reaction. This study was referenced in popular news by many sources.

Healthy Women, Healthy Lives goes beyond simply labeling preventive measures and risky behavior - it provides practical tips and strategies from clinical experts at Harvard Medical School for making healthy lifestyle changes

Healthy Women, Healthy Lives goes beyond simply labeling preventive measures and risky behavior - it provides practical tips and strategies from clinical experts at Harvard Medical School for making healthy lifestyle changes. Here are the best ways to lower the risk of a host of chronic diseases, as well as tips for losing weight, stopping smoking, eating healthily, and exercising regularly

Healthy Women, Healthy Lives. A Guide to Preventing Disease, from the Landmark Nurses' Health Study.

Healthy Women, Healthy Lives. Since 1976, the world-famous Harvard Medical School Nurses' Health Study has followed more than 120,000 real women, leading real lives, to discover what factors contribute to improving the health of women. Here are the best ways to lower the risk of a host of chronic diseases, as well as tips for losing weight, stopping smoking, eating healthily, and exercising regularly

Hankinson, Graham A. . Colditz, JoAnn E.

Healthy Women, Healthy Lives: A Guide to Preventing Disease, from the Landmark Nurses' Health Study by Susan E. S. Hankinson, Graham A. 1412 downloads at 25 mb/s. The results of a groundbreaking study of 225,000 women traces the connection between habits and health, focusing on weight gain, exercise, substance abuse, and other important issues related to women's health.

Graham A. Colditz and Susan E. Hankinson. Abstract The Nurses’ Health Study has grown from a simple questionnaire-based study. initiated in 1976 to a rich resource of information collected over 29 years. Important details about. lifestyle have been collected throughout the study and, as the study has progressed, blood. samples and DNA from buccal cells have been collected and stored. also been collected from participants who developed cancer.

Hankinson SE, Manson JE, Colditz GA (2002) Healthy women, healthy lives: a guide to preventing disease . 2018) Habitual sleep quality, plasma metabolites and risk of coronary heart disease in post-menopausal women. Int J EpidemiolGoogle Scholar.

Hankinson SE, Manson JE, Colditz GA (2002) Healthy women, healthy lives: a guide to preventing disease, from the landmark Nurses’ Health Study. Simon and Schuster, New YokGoogle Scholar.

The results of a groundbreaking study of 225,000 women traces the connection between habits and health, focusing on weight gain, exercise, substance abuse, and other important issues related to women's health.

Healthy Women, Healthy Lives: A Guide to Preventing Disease, from the Landmark Nurses' Health Study epub download

ISBN13: 978-0684855196

ISBN: 0684855194

Author: Susan E. Sc.D. Hankinson,Graham A. M.D. Colditz,JoAnn E. M.D. Manson,Frank E. M.D. Speizer

Category: Health and Fitness

Subcategory: Women's Health

Language: English

Publisher: Free Press; First edition (July 10, 2001)

Pages: 576 pages

ePUB size: 1978 kb

FB2 size: 1953 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 981

Other Formats: mbr azw docx lit

Related to Healthy Women, Healthy Lives: A Guide to Preventing Disease, from the Landmark Nurses' Health Study ePub books

avanger
The info in this book is priceless, and could help you live a healthier life. The font type is average, NOT microscopic as PRO states.
avanger
The info in this book is priceless, and could help you live a healthier life. The font type is average, NOT microscopic as PRO states.
Phain
This book is a darn shame. I returned the item because the text is microscopic and too difficult to read. I realized it once I turned to the first page and needed a magnifying glass! Worst than the typeface is the fact that you'll receive only a few dollars back after returning the book to them in new condition. I WOULD NOT RECOMMEND BUYING THIS BOOK!!
Phain
This book is a darn shame. I returned the item because the text is microscopic and too difficult to read. I realized it once I turned to the first page and needed a magnifying glass! Worst than the typeface is the fact that you'll receive only a few dollars back after returning the book to them in new condition. I WOULD NOT RECOMMEND BUYING THIS BOOK!!
Ochach
It's important that women read this to be knowledgeable about there health for there self so if thay have a problem thay know some thing is wrong with them so women read this a must enjoy
Ochach
It's important that women read this to be knowledgeable about there health for there self so if thay have a problem thay know some thing is wrong with them so women read this a must enjoy
Ironrunner
This book deserves more than five stars. It is by far the best resource on women's health issues that I have seen.
Review Summary: How can women improve their health by changing their lifestyle, diet, and activities? That's the question that this book answers. Based on the longest running and most authoritative sources of information, you should prefer the information here to what you will read in other resources. The book deals with factors like age, race, exercise, diet, use of supplements, weight, birth control pill and hormone replacement usage, smoking, and drinking in order to define how these affect the incidence of disease. In addition, the book also tells women how to improve their chances for avoiding diseases where where behavior counts for a lot.
Review: The detailed focus of this book is remarkable. Unlike most books about health that look at men and women together, this one drills down to many different perpectives on women. For instance, if you took oral contraceptives in the 1970s, what is the effect on your risk of breast cancer today? If you take supplementary calcium now, how does that affect your risk of having a bone fracture when you are past 70? These are the kind of specific, and important questions that this book looks at. And the data are not necessarily what you think. Calcium supplements, for instance, don't seem to help with reducing fractures. If you discontinued oral contraceptives some time ago, the impact on breast cancer incidence seems to drop off to nil.
The data for the book come from several long-term studies. The most significant is Harvard Medical School's Nurses' Health Study, which began in 1976. The base was 120,000 R.N.s aged 30-55. The original focus of this work was on oral contraceptives, but many other data were assembled in two page questionnaires sent every other year. Since then, biological samples have been added liked toenail clippings and blood. In 1989 116,000 more nurses were added in the Nurses' Health Study II, which tracks younger women than those in the earlier group who are now increasingly elderly. Nurses were originally chosen because it was thought they would be more accurate in their data and more likely to be open about sharing information about contraceptive and reproductive practices. Since then the National Institutes of Health have also started a tracking study focusing on the use of postmenopausal hormones, low fat diets, and the impact of calcium and other supplements on postmenopausal health. All three studies are used extensively in this book.
The book's first section looks at the studies and how to interpret the data that come from them. The second section (and the longest) looks at a different diseases. Instead of lumping cancer together, for instance, you get separate looks at breast, lung, colon, endometrial, ovarian, and skin cancer. Other dieases covered include heart disease, stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, asthma, arthritis, eye ailments, and Alzheimer's. The final section is on advice about how to do better with physical activity, weight control, smoking, nutrients, foods, alcohol, vitamins and minerals, postmenopausal hormones, birth control, and aspirin.
Unlike many books coming from physicians, this book is easy to understand and apply. You get a lot of scientific data, but you also get lots of instances of plain English. For example, there are quotes from nurses and how one doctor provides advice in each section for what she or he tells patients about that subject. Also, each chapter has a simple, useful summary that you can use to put everything in perspective.
If the book has a weakness, it's that you cannot learn as much as you need to know about how to change difficult behaviors like smoking and eating foods that lead to excess weight in brief chapters. So, once you've decided you want to improve your behavior, I suggest that you also seek out other books that are more specialized on those issues.
Obviously, this book will be of interest and value to women. Why should men read it? I told my wife about how good I thought this book was, and she asked me how she should change her behavior based on the book's information. I was able to summarize for her in less than five minutes what I had observed that she could beneficially change. So this book can be valuable for men to read, if they share the information with women they know. Also, men can give this book to women as a token of their love and caring.
After you finish this book, I suggest that you also think about where you can get such authoritative information about other important subjects in your life . . . like getting along well with others, enjoying good mental health, feeling happy and optimistic, and giving and receiving love. Why not make improvements in all these dimensions?
Remember: You deserve the best that you can provide for yourself!
Ironrunner
This book deserves more than five stars. It is by far the best resource on women's health issues that I have seen.
Review Summary: How can women improve their health by changing their lifestyle, diet, and activities? That's the question that this book answers. Based on the longest running and most authoritative sources of information, you should prefer the information here to what you will read in other resources. The book deals with factors like age, race, exercise, diet, use of supplements, weight, birth control pill and hormone replacement usage, smoking, and drinking in order to define how these affect the incidence of disease. In addition, the book also tells women how to improve their chances for avoiding diseases where where behavior counts for a lot.
Review: The detailed focus of this book is remarkable. Unlike most books about health that look at men and women together, this one drills down to many different perpectives on women. For instance, if you took oral contraceptives in the 1970s, what is the effect on your risk of breast cancer today? If you take supplementary calcium now, how does that affect your risk of having a bone fracture when you are past 70? These are the kind of specific, and important questions that this book looks at. And the data are not necessarily what you think. Calcium supplements, for instance, don't seem to help with reducing fractures. If you discontinued oral contraceptives some time ago, the impact on breast cancer incidence seems to drop off to nil.
The data for the book come from several long-term studies. The most significant is Harvard Medical School's Nurses' Health Study, which began in 1976. The base was 120,000 R.N.s aged 30-55. The original focus of this work was on oral contraceptives, but many other data were assembled in two page questionnaires sent every other year. Since then, biological samples have been added liked toenail clippings and blood. In 1989 116,000 more nurses were added in the Nurses' Health Study II, which tracks younger women than those in the earlier group who are now increasingly elderly. Nurses were originally chosen because it was thought they would be more accurate in their data and more likely to be open about sharing information about contraceptive and reproductive practices. Since then the National Institutes of Health have also started a tracking study focusing on the use of postmenopausal hormones, low fat diets, and the impact of calcium and other supplements on postmenopausal health. All three studies are used extensively in this book.
The book's first section looks at the studies and how to interpret the data that come from them. The second section (and the longest) looks at a different diseases. Instead of lumping cancer together, for instance, you get separate looks at breast, lung, colon, endometrial, ovarian, and skin cancer. Other dieases covered include heart disease, stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, asthma, arthritis, eye ailments, and Alzheimer's. The final section is on advice about how to do better with physical activity, weight control, smoking, nutrients, foods, alcohol, vitamins and minerals, postmenopausal hormones, birth control, and aspirin.
Unlike many books coming from physicians, this book is easy to understand and apply. You get a lot of scientific data, but you also get lots of instances of plain English. For example, there are quotes from nurses and how one doctor provides advice in each section for what she or he tells patients about that subject. Also, each chapter has a simple, useful summary that you can use to put everything in perspective.
If the book has a weakness, it's that you cannot learn as much as you need to know about how to change difficult behaviors like smoking and eating foods that lead to excess weight in brief chapters. So, once you've decided you want to improve your behavior, I suggest that you also seek out other books that are more specialized on those issues.
Obviously, this book will be of interest and value to women. Why should men read it? I told my wife about how good I thought this book was, and she asked me how she should change her behavior based on the book's information. I was able to summarize for her in less than five minutes what I had observed that she could beneficially change. So this book can be valuable for men to read, if they share the information with women they know. Also, men can give this book to women as a token of their love and caring.
After you finish this book, I suggest that you also think about where you can get such authoritative information about other important subjects in your life . . . like getting along well with others, enjoying good mental health, feeling happy and optimistic, and giving and receiving love. Why not make improvements in all these dimensions?
Remember: You deserve the best that you can provide for yourself!
Zut
The Landmark Nurse Health Study was enormously interesting and full of useful information,as well as being clearly and understandably written for the layperson. The authors enlisted the help of 170,000 nurses to track their health status over the past 25 years, by filling out questionnaires every few years, occasionally requesting blood samples and even nail clippings from some. This is a report on their work, which also cites many other studies, some that agree and others that disagree with the authors findings. They emphasize that this is the latest word, but not the last.
The researchers discuss at length those situations in which certain medications that are advantageous for one disorder may be disadvantageous for another. Choosing which way to go will require consideration of hereditary factors and family history, as well as consultation with ones primary care provider.
Asking nurses to do this kind of information gathering was well conceived, as we all know that nurses are meticulous record keepers, as well as being altruistic and concerned with the welfare of their fellow human beings.
I find myself quoting frequently from this book, as well as recommending it to all my women friends and relatives. I enjoyed reading it and benefited from the information it contained.
Zut
The Landmark Nurse Health Study was enormously interesting and full of useful information,as well as being clearly and understandably written for the layperson. The authors enlisted the help of 170,000 nurses to track their health status over the past 25 years, by filling out questionnaires every few years, occasionally requesting blood samples and even nail clippings from some. This is a report on their work, which also cites many other studies, some that agree and others that disagree with the authors findings. They emphasize that this is the latest word, but not the last.
The researchers discuss at length those situations in which certain medications that are advantageous for one disorder may be disadvantageous for another. Choosing which way to go will require consideration of hereditary factors and family history, as well as consultation with ones primary care provider.
Asking nurses to do this kind of information gathering was well conceived, as we all know that nurses are meticulous record keepers, as well as being altruistic and concerned with the welfare of their fellow human beings.
I find myself quoting frequently from this book, as well as recommending it to all my women friends and relatives. I enjoyed reading it and benefited from the information it contained.