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As Far As the Eye Can See: Reflections of an Appalachian Trail Hiker epub download

by David Brill


Many an armchair hiker has dreamed of traversing the Appalachian Trail in its entirety. In 1979, David Brill became one of the first of a new generation to complete the Georgia-to-Maine hike

Many an armchair hiker has dreamed of traversing the Appalachian Trail in its entirety. In 1979, David Brill became one of the first of a new generation to complete the Georgia-to-Maine hike. As Far as the Eye Can See chronicles his six-month, 2,100-mile walk, a quest to grow, to breathe, to change, to discover what really mattered to him. This book is for anyone intereste Many an armchair hiker has dreamed of traversing the Appalachian Trail in its entirety.

In 1979, David Brill became one of the first of a new generation to complete the Georgia-to-Maine hike on the Appalachian Trail

In 1979, David Brill became one of the first of a new generation to complete the Georgia-to-Maine hike on the Appalachian Trail.

In 1979, David Brill became one of the first of a new generation to complete the Georgia-to-Maine hike on the Appalachian Trail. As Far as the Eye Can See, now a classic, chronicles his six-month, 2,100 mile walk, a quest to live simply.

In his book, As Far As The Eye Can See, David Brill. One of the best Appalachian Trail books ever written. com User, February 18, 2001. After five months and 2,100 miles, the author emerged from the trail as a man at home in the wilds and at peace with himself. The Book Reader calls this work Evocatively written gems of observation, full of observation, full of native wisdom. By the time you finish this book, you'll be ready to throw a pack over your shoulder (a large one) and head for the AT. Hikers and non-hikers alike will appreciate Brill's wonderful book about his journey.

As Far As The Eye Can See: Reflections Of An Appalachian Trail Hiker – David Brill. Written about his thru hike in 1979, David Brill provides a rare look into the trail culture and personalities of his generation

As Far As The Eye Can See: Reflections Of An Appalachian Trail Hiker – David Brill. Written about his thru hike in 1979, David Brill provides a rare look into the trail culture and personalities of his generation. Brill tells of his transition from a self-described visitor to the woods to a full-time resident. Readers get a look into some of the more subtle changes that occur in a person during their thru hike. Brill also takes a deeper look into how a person is affected after their hike is complete.

David Brill, author of As Far as the Eye Can See: Reflections of an Appalachian Trail Hiker. The Appalachian Trail covers 2,180. miles, passing through fourteen states from Georgia to Maine. Each year, an estimated 2–3 million people visit the trail, and almost two thousand attempt a thru-hike, walking the entire distance of the path. Rather than ask if wilder-ness and outdoor recreation have benefits for the soul, this volume investigates specifically how long-distance walking.

David Brill, author of As Far as the Eye Can See: Reflections of an. . The Appalachian Trail covers 2,180 miles, passing through fourteen states from Georgia to Maine. For many, the journey transcends a mere walk in the woods and becomes a modern-day pilgrimage.

The author relives his five-month journey along the Appalachian Trail, from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mount Katahdin in Maine

As Far As the Eye Can See: Reflections of an Appalachian Trail Hiker epub download

ISBN13: 978-1558530737

ISBN: 1558530738

Author: David Brill

Category: Health and Fitness

Subcategory: Exercise & Fitness

Language: English

Publisher: Rutledge Hill Pr (October 1, 1990)

Pages: 190 pages

ePUB size: 1466 kb

FB2 size: 1168 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 878

Other Formats: mbr azw doc lit

Related to As Far As the Eye Can See: Reflections of an Appalachian Trail Hiker ePub books

hulk
Unlike most AT books, this is not a chronological narrative. Its chapters are thematic, each creating an impressionistic image of some aspect of the trail. It was written by a young man who wanted to be a writer, and that is exactly how it reads. Written in the 1970s, it will remind some readers of the book A Walk Across America by Peter Jenkins, who set out on a hike during the same period searching for the same things. Although dated in many respects, AT hikers will recognize some things that never change such as the eternal battle between mice and those who try to sleep in their shelters. The last few short chapters are about the author's return to the trail many years later, and the overall tone of the book is nostalgic as he reflects on the greatest adventure of his life, and then seeks to recapture some of it once more.
hulk
Unlike most AT books, this is not a chronological narrative. Its chapters are thematic, each creating an impressionistic image of some aspect of the trail. It was written by a young man who wanted to be a writer, and that is exactly how it reads. Written in the 1970s, it will remind some readers of the book A Walk Across America by Peter Jenkins, who set out on a hike during the same period searching for the same things. Although dated in many respects, AT hikers will recognize some things that never change such as the eternal battle between mice and those who try to sleep in their shelters. The last few short chapters are about the author's return to the trail many years later, and the overall tone of the book is nostalgic as he reflects on the greatest adventure of his life, and then seeks to recapture some of it once more.
Danrad
David Brill's "As Far As The Eye Can See" is about the author's late-70s Appalachian Trail thru-hike. I've read numerous books by other authors who have done the same thing, but this one is one of the best.

Brill was a recent college graduate in 1979, and like many of us who grew up during that time, he wasn't sure who he was or what he wanted to do with his life. On a whim he decided to hike the entire Appalachian trail. He wasn't an experienced hiker or camper when he started out, but we see him grow from fear of the unknown in the dark woods of Georgia to a seasoned outdoorsman by the time he scaled Katahdin in Maine. He paints a vivid picture of the blisters and thunderstorms, mountains and rivers, and animals and people he met on the trail. But Brill takes his book a layer or two deeper than the average trail diary.

The book is written more as a collection of essays than a daily journal. While the skipping around between before-hike, during-hike and after-hike stories take some getting used to, the overall picture is one of a sensitive and kind young man who found that he feels most at home in nature. I especially appreciated that he spent time getting to know people with different backgrounds and beliefs before judging them.

This is one of the more upbeat books written by a thru-hiker. He doesn't gloss over the rainy nights, stinky bodies in the shelters, the muscle strains or the mosquitoes. But his wonder and enjoyment give the entire book an optimistic feel.

This is a wonderful book and will appeal to anyone who loves the outdoors or who has dreamed of hiking the AT.
Danrad
David Brill's "As Far As The Eye Can See" is about the author's late-70s Appalachian Trail thru-hike. I've read numerous books by other authors who have done the same thing, but this one is one of the best.

Brill was a recent college graduate in 1979, and like many of us who grew up during that time, he wasn't sure who he was or what he wanted to do with his life. On a whim he decided to hike the entire Appalachian trail. He wasn't an experienced hiker or camper when he started out, but we see him grow from fear of the unknown in the dark woods of Georgia to a seasoned outdoorsman by the time he scaled Katahdin in Maine. He paints a vivid picture of the blisters and thunderstorms, mountains and rivers, and animals and people he met on the trail. But Brill takes his book a layer or two deeper than the average trail diary.

The book is written more as a collection of essays than a daily journal. While the skipping around between before-hike, during-hike and after-hike stories take some getting used to, the overall picture is one of a sensitive and kind young man who found that he feels most at home in nature. I especially appreciated that he spent time getting to know people with different backgrounds and beliefs before judging them.

This is one of the more upbeat books written by a thru-hiker. He doesn't gloss over the rainy nights, stinky bodies in the shelters, the muscle strains or the mosquitoes. But his wonder and enjoyment give the entire book an optimistic feel.

This is a wonderful book and will appeal to anyone who loves the outdoors or who has dreamed of hiking the AT.
Ral
David Brill not only carries you through the entire AT, he touches upon the transformation he went through as a result of the ardous conditions he experienced, the lifelong friends he made and the culture of the many hikers he met along the way. If you love backpacking you will love this book.
Ral
David Brill not only carries you through the entire AT, he touches upon the transformation he went through as a result of the ardous conditions he experienced, the lifelong friends he made and the culture of the many hikers he met along the way. If you love backpacking you will love this book.
Anarawield
I read this book every year or two, usually after returning from an AT section hike (I've done 300 miles). It's my favorite AT book for many reasons. First, Brill hiked the AT in its infancy as a thru hiking destination. Second, the book is organized by subject matter rather than as a chronological list of details. Third, and perhaps most important, the writing is brilliant and the book is actually literature of the finest sort. Just read his description of the seasons, especially the part about watching the line of new spring foliage creeping up the mountains each day.
Anarawield
I read this book every year or two, usually after returning from an AT section hike (I've done 300 miles). It's my favorite AT book for many reasons. First, Brill hiked the AT in its infancy as a thru hiking destination. Second, the book is organized by subject matter rather than as a chronological list of details. Third, and perhaps most important, the writing is brilliant and the book is actually literature of the finest sort. Just read his description of the seasons, especially the part about watching the line of new spring foliage creeping up the mountains each day.
Andromajurus
This book offers a great adventure on the AT trail and You can do it from your armchair .I love meeting new people and the stress one put oneself through to do this train is amazing. There are great stories along the way and it is exciting to reach the end of the trail.
Andromajurus
This book offers a great adventure on the AT trail and You can do it from your armchair .I love meeting new people and the stress one put oneself through to do this train is amazing. There are great stories along the way and it is exciting to reach the end of the trail.
Neol
Well done, captures the essence of the experience!
Neol
Well done, captures the essence of the experience!
Gnng
Wow, another thru hiker book that I have read and I have loved them all. It's the authors style of writing that keeps you reading, stride for stride!
Gnng
Wow, another thru hiker book that I have read and I have loved them all. It's the authors style of writing that keeps you reading, stride for stride!
Well written and enjoyable. One of the best trail books I've read with regards to expressing the permanent changes that a through hike can make in one''s life.
Well written and enjoyable. One of the best trail books I've read with regards to expressing the permanent changes that a through hike can make in one''s life.