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Your Health: What Works, What Doesn't epub download

by Editors of Reader's Digest


Reader's Digest is an American general-interest family magazine, published ten times a year. Formerly based in Pleasantville, New York, it is now headquartered in Midtown Manhattan

Reader's Digest is an American general-interest family magazine, published ten times a year. Formerly based in Pleasantville, New York, it is now headquartered in Midtown Manhattan. The magazine was founded in 1922, by DeWitt Wallace and Lila Bell Wallace. For many years, Reader's Digest was the best-selling consumer magazine in the United States; it lost the distinction in 2009 to Better Homes and Gardens.

The book, in its "journey" through what is good for your health and what is not, covers health issues such as. .The book has a one sided view on statins and doesn't mention its side effects I had a stomach problem that was made worse b.

The book, in its "journey" through what is good for your health and what is not, covers health issues such as: mobile phones and cancer calcium supplements cough sunglasses barbecued meats fish oil supplements. The book has a one sided view on statins and doesn't mention its side effects I had a stomach problem that was made worse by GPs. I ended up sorting the problem on my own, without doctors or drugs.

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Reader's Digest' readers lead some funny lives I was working in Army security when a VIP from another base called to ask to whom he should address an important letter

Reader's Digest' readers lead some funny lives. Here are the most hilarious true reader stories from 2015. As if the declining health of my grandmother weren’t enough, my parents suddenly had to contend with an ant infestation. So I was glad to get a text from Mom updating me: Exterminator was here; thinks she got the nest behind the microwave. I was working in Army security when a VIP from another base called to ask to whom he should address an important letter. Knowing my tough-to-spell last name would give him fits, I said, Just put down Sergeant Gary, as my last name is too hard. The next day, I received a letter addressed to Sgt. Gary Toohard.

Why seriously comfortable underwear works wonders for your health.

Sophie Dahl "Books that changed my life". Why seriously comfortable underwear works wonders for your health. A neighbourly nudge to curb loneliness – Joy’s story. Books that changed my life: Fay Henson.

A collection of words of wisdom, wry witticisms, provocative opinions, and inspiring reflections-from Benjamin Franklin to Colin Powell, Abraham Lincoln to Mother Teresa, Margaret Mead to Garrison Keillor. From one of the most popular features of Reader's Digest magazine. The hundreds of jokes and quips in Laughter the Best Medicine @ Work have been collected from more than eight decades' worth of Reader's Digest magazines and are guaranteed to brighten up your workday.

Reader’s Digest has been sharing laughs about the work world in our magazine pages for decades.

Unauthorized reproduction, in any manner, is prohibited. Reader’s Digest is a registered. Cover and spot illustrations: George McKeon. Reader’s Digest has been sharing laughs about the work world in our magazine pages for decades. Now we’ve gathered the funniest of the funny into one volume. In the pages ahead you’ll find hundreds of our most hilarious jokes, cartoons, and real-life experiences about all things work.

Read All In A Day's Work from the story Reader's Digest Jokes by imnotimaginary (Kiera Kye) with 3,224 reads. Sit Back, Relax, and enjoy the Book! Disclaimer: I do not own any of the jokes in this book. I just compiled them. So please, don't sue me. Okay?

Read All In A Day's Work from the story Reader's Digest Jokes by imnotimaginary (Kiera Kye) with 3,224 reads. digest, funny, readers  . Okay? Okay.

Calories are the key to weight loss – and weight gain. Second, our bodies work against us: After you’ve lost some weight, your metabolism slows down so that you have to eat less and less just to maintain that weight loss. It’s your body’s way of making sure you don’t starve. A third problem: People who are overly anxious to drop pounds sometimes cut too many calories. Source: Your Health: What Works, What Doesn’t. Get a healthy dose of weight loss, nutrition and health news with our free newsletters. Originally Published on sitename.

Based on hundreds of the most definitive studies and conversations with leading doctors and health specialists, Your Health uncovers what works and what doesn't when it comes to improving your health. Discover which treatments help cure ailments and which common products and practices-from artificial sweeteners to acupuncture-are safe and effective. Divided into four parts this book will help you make the most of your health: Part 1-Getting the Truth: Learn how to be a smart medical consumer, from understanding your condition to figuring out which websites you can trust Part 2-Your General Health: Covers skin and hair treatments; liposuction; supplements; tooth whiteners; foods, drinks, and your diet; Weight loss and fitness; breastfeeding, childbirth, and fertility; home medical tests, mattresses, and other things around the house; what's in your medicine cabinet; medical tests Part 3-Treating What Ails You: Acne, Allergies, Snoring, Anxiety, Arthritis, Asthma, Back Pain, Bad Breath, Breast Cancer, Bruises, Colds, Cold Sores, Colon Cancer, Constipation, Coughs, Depression, Diabetes, Diarrhea, Ear Infections, Eczema, Fatigue, Flatulence, Flu, Headache, Heartburn, Heart Disease, Nicotine Addiction, Yeast Infections, Insomnia, Varicose Veins, Migraines, Nausea, Ulcers, Osteoporosis, Warts, Prostate Cancer, Prostate Enlargement, Restless Legs Syndrome, Premenstrual Syndrome, High Blood Pressure, Urinary Tract Infection, Menopause Symptoms, Alzheimer's Disease, and High Cholesterol. Part 4-Is it Safe or Dangerous?: Acupuncture, Anesthesia, Antibiotics, Tattoos, Breast Implants, Bug Spray, Cell Phones, Chiropractic, Commuting, Cookware, Dental Fillings, Deodorant, Flu Shots, Food Colorings, Generic Drugs, Hospitals, Sleeping Pills, Styrofoam Cups, Mail-Order Drugs, Hot Tubs, Manicures, Salad Bars, Microwave Ovens, Humidifiers, Sushi, Tanning Salons, Antidepressants, Television, Vaccinations, Video Games, X-rays, Yoga, Household Cleaners, Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), Hormone Replacement Therapy, Vitamins and Minerals, Artificial Sweeteners, Barbecued Meat, Blood Transfusions, and High-Fructose Corn Syrup. Before taking medicine, start a new diet or exercise regime, get a medical test, or swallow a supplement, why not find out if it works-or if something else might work better?

Your Health: What Works, What Doesn't epub download

ISBN13: 978-1606521502

ISBN: 1606521500

Author: Editors of Reader's Digest

Category: Health and Fitness

Subcategory: Diseases & Physical Ailments

Language: English

Publisher: Readers Digest; 1 edition (June 10, 2010)

Pages: 416 pages

ePUB size: 1898 kb

FB2 size: 1924 kb

Rating: 4.1

Votes: 692

Other Formats: azw mobi lit rtf

Related to Your Health: What Works, What Doesn't ePub books

Tori Texer
I like this book very much. I had been looking for it, and was happy to find it on Amazon. It answers the little things you forget to ask your doctor until you get to the parking lot. Example: Should you drink bottled water.
Tori Texer
I like this book very much. I had been looking for it, and was happy to find it on Amazon. It answers the little things you forget to ask your doctor until you get to the parking lot. Example: Should you drink bottled water.
Rare
This book is written for the complete novice of which I am not. However, I did get a few things from it which ended up being worth the price.
Rare
This book is written for the complete novice of which I am not. However, I did get a few things from it which ended up being worth the price.
Enila
OK!
Enila
OK!
Zargelynd
Great book for health nuts!
Zargelynd
Great book for health nuts!
BORZOTA
Got this for my husband for christmas. Took it on the cruise with him. It's a good health book to have.
BORZOTA
Got this for my husband for christmas. Took it on the cruise with him. It's a good health book to have.
Helo
This could have been an interesting book on the effectiveness of
treatments that go from the use of botox to the advantage ( or not ) of taking herbal
supplements. The book, in its "journey" through what is good for your health and what is not,
covers health issues such as:

mobile phones and cancer
calcium supplements
cough
sunglasses
barbecued meats
fish oil supplements

When I ordered this book I was under the wrong impression that the book would be mainly
about which supplements do work.
Well, not at all. Most of the topics in the book are not about supplements.

I went through this book and first thought that I should read it with a pinch of salt. I kept going
and realised that I should actually read this book with a bucketful of salt...

It surprised me that the book has a , somehow, unfriendly view of natural supplements whilst
saying that aspartame should be avoided only by people with a rare medical condition...

it is not only the use of aspartame that is defended in this book. The book says that MSG does not cause
headaches, according to the best studies ( they don't mention the source of studies)
Then, in the "small print", they say that actually 2% of people could be indeed sensitive to MSG...
Despite of that, they say that if you have a headache after eating Chinese food with MSG the headache might be just a fruit of your imagination...

The book also says that zinc lozenges, for example, are a waste of time, what contradicts not only many
other books and studies but also the book "Healing Supplements", published by Readers Digest...

It was when I read about prostate cancer that I gave up on this book. They say that recent studies ( the book is from 2008 ) that lycopene,
an antioxidant found in tomatoes, it is not beneficial for the prostate. That goes against
just about everything I've read about lycopene and prostate, including more than one Readers Digest publication.
They mention a Harvard study where lycopene was found to protect the prostate but another study, in Europe, failed to confirm that information.
They say that five out of eight studies don't show any special benefits from eating tomatoes. So, 5 out of 8 studies is reason enough for the authors of this book
to consider tomato useless for the prostate. Very scientific...
Tomato is not going to protect your prostate agains cancer , according to this book, but a drug from a giant pharmaceutical company will...

They write a big no to say that mobile phones don't cause cancer but then they go to say that "signals about long term are fuzzy". So , why did they say affirmed
that mobile phones don't cause cancer?

It is okay if children eat lots of sugar, that won't affect their behaviour.
Eating at night will not make you fat, as there is no difference between eating a pint of ice cream at 8 am or 8pm...
These are just two pearls from this book...

Most of the experts consulted for this book are MDs. Just a few are pharmacists or nutritionists.
There is plenty of information in this prejudiced book that is contradicted by the information you will find in many good authors who are also doctors, nutritionists and pharmacists.
This book is so idiotic that manages to even contradict itself...It says, on page 153, that " antioxidants in green tea may have an unusually potent effect on prostate cancer". Then,
on page 318, the book advices to ignore green tea and it says that: "It is highly unlikely that (green tea ) protects against prostate cancer"...

I found contradictory information even in the same page...Example: There is a list on page 253 pointing out, with green signs, what works for asthma. One of the green signs goes
for salmon and mackerel because they are "packed to the gills with omega 3 fatty acids, beneficial compounds that fight inflammation". Then, on the same page, they have a list of
"don't bother", products marked with a red X that don't work. One of them is fish oil, that is , omega 3 fatty acids...

The book points out, on page 316, that 360mg of magnesium would be beneficial for migraines and premenstrual syndrome. Then, on page 387 they list the maximum dosage of
a few supplements that you should never ever exceed. Magnesium dosage that should never be exceeded is 360 mg...On the top of that, there are studies where 600 mg of
Magnesium were given to migraine sufferers and the supplement helped 40% of them...

Reading this book is like going to a conservative, skeptical and incompetent doctor. The book says no to some traditional and proven supplements whilst saying yes to many pharmaceutical drugs like statin.
The book has a one sided view on statins and doesn't mention its side effects. Many doctors, actually, are against the use of statins..

I had a stomach problem that was made worse by GPs. I ended up sorting the problem on my own,
without doctors or drugs...It was many years ago and I didn't have even a cold in the last six years or so...
I do take supplements from reliable companies, after checking
information about supplements in different books and cross referencing the information. They work. Books like this make me sick to my stomach...

Of course, the book certainly has good information about many topics but considering the stupidity and contradictions of their views on supplements and other topics, it is difficult to
know which topics you can rely on or not. Best thing to do is to ignore this book altogether.
Helo
This could have been an interesting book on the effectiveness of
treatments that go from the use of botox to the advantage ( or not ) of taking herbal
supplements. The book, in its "journey" through what is good for your health and what is not,
covers health issues such as:

mobile phones and cancer
calcium supplements
cough
sunglasses
barbecued meats
fish oil supplements

When I ordered this book I was under the wrong impression that the book would be mainly
about which supplements do work.
Well, not at all. Most of the topics in the book are not about supplements.

I went through this book and first thought that I should read it with a pinch of salt. I kept going
and realised that I should actually read this book with a bucketful of salt...

It surprised me that the book has a , somehow, unfriendly view of natural supplements whilst
saying that aspartame should be avoided only by people with a rare medical condition...

it is not only the use of aspartame that is defended in this book. The book says that MSG does not cause
headaches, according to the best studies ( they don't mention the source of studies)
Then, in the "small print", they say that actually 2% of people could be indeed sensitive to MSG...
Despite of that, they say that if you have a headache after eating Chinese food with MSG the headache might be just a fruit of your imagination...

The book also says that zinc lozenges, for example, are a waste of time, what contradicts not only many
other books and studies but also the book "Healing Supplements", published by Readers Digest...

It was when I read about prostate cancer that I gave up on this book. They say that recent studies ( the book is from 2008 ) that lycopene,
an antioxidant found in tomatoes, it is not beneficial for the prostate. That goes against
just about everything I've read about lycopene and prostate, including more than one Readers Digest publication.
They mention a Harvard study where lycopene was found to protect the prostate but another study, in Europe, failed to confirm that information.
They say that five out of eight studies don't show any special benefits from eating tomatoes. So, 5 out of 8 studies is reason enough for the authors of this book
to consider tomato useless for the prostate. Very scientific...
Tomato is not going to protect your prostate agains cancer , according to this book, but a drug from a giant pharmaceutical company will...

They write a big no to say that mobile phones don't cause cancer but then they go to say that "signals about long term are fuzzy". So , why did they say affirmed
that mobile phones don't cause cancer?

It is okay if children eat lots of sugar, that won't affect their behaviour.
Eating at night will not make you fat, as there is no difference between eating a pint of ice cream at 8 am or 8pm...
These are just two pearls from this book...

Most of the experts consulted for this book are MDs. Just a few are pharmacists or nutritionists.
There is plenty of information in this prejudiced book that is contradicted by the information you will find in many good authors who are also doctors, nutritionists and pharmacists.
This book is so idiotic that manages to even contradict itself...It says, on page 153, that " antioxidants in green tea may have an unusually potent effect on prostate cancer". Then,
on page 318, the book advices to ignore green tea and it says that: "It is highly unlikely that (green tea ) protects against prostate cancer"...

I found contradictory information even in the same page...Example: There is a list on page 253 pointing out, with green signs, what works for asthma. One of the green signs goes
for salmon and mackerel because they are "packed to the gills with omega 3 fatty acids, beneficial compounds that fight inflammation". Then, on the same page, they have a list of
"don't bother", products marked with a red X that don't work. One of them is fish oil, that is , omega 3 fatty acids...

The book points out, on page 316, that 360mg of magnesium would be beneficial for migraines and premenstrual syndrome. Then, on page 387 they list the maximum dosage of
a few supplements that you should never ever exceed. Magnesium dosage that should never be exceeded is 360 mg...On the top of that, there are studies where 600 mg of
Magnesium were given to migraine sufferers and the supplement helped 40% of them...

Reading this book is like going to a conservative, skeptical and incompetent doctor. The book says no to some traditional and proven supplements whilst saying yes to many pharmaceutical drugs like statin.
The book has a one sided view on statins and doesn't mention its side effects. Many doctors, actually, are against the use of statins..

I had a stomach problem that was made worse by GPs. I ended up sorting the problem on my own,
without doctors or drugs...It was many years ago and I didn't have even a cold in the last six years or so...
I do take supplements from reliable companies, after checking
information about supplements in different books and cross referencing the information. They work. Books like this make me sick to my stomach...

Of course, the book certainly has good information about many topics but considering the stupidity and contradictions of their views on supplements and other topics, it is difficult to
know which topics you can rely on or not. Best thing to do is to ignore this book altogether.
Kadar
I enjoyed reading it. It reads quickly and you can skip chapters that don't interest you. I thought it was more expensive than 7$
Kadar
I enjoyed reading it. It reads quickly and you can skip chapters that don't interest you. I thought it was more expensive than 7$