» » The Complete Annotated Oz Squad

The Complete Annotated Oz Squad epub download

by Steve Ahlquist,Andrew Murphy,Mike Sagara


The Complete Annotated Oz Squad by. Steve Ahlquist, Mike Sagara.

by Steve Ahlquist, Mike Sagara, Andrew Murphy. Rock & Roll Comics: The Beatles Experience. Mike Sagara, Vinnie Tartamella, Stuart Immonen.

Often immitated, never duplicated, Oz Squad is the first and best comic book inspired by the classic Wizard of Oz. .

Often immitated, never duplicated, Oz Squad is the first and best comic book inspired by the classic Wizard of Oz series of books by L. Frank Baum. Often imitated and/or ripped off, Steve Ahlquist's Oz Squad is finally back in print! One of the great black & white independent comics from the early ninties, Oz Squad is an imaginative update of creator L. Frank Baum's world with a twist of Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol!Like many of Carl Bark's classic Duck Tales, Oz Squad can be appreciated by all audiences and is a must have for any Oz afficianado or lover of.

Steve Ahlquist, Andrew Murphy, Mike Sagara. Often imitated, never duplicated, Oz Squad is the first and best comic book inspired by the classic Wizard of Oz series of books by L. It is the ultimate collection and it comes with notes and annotations by the author, explaining some of the deeper mysteries and sillier aspects of the series.

Often imitated, never duplicated, Oz Squad is the first and best comic book inspired by the classic Wizard of Oz series of books by L.

Find nearly any book by Andrew Murphy. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Complete Annotated Oz Squad. by Steve Ahlquist, Andrew Murphy, Mike Sagara. ISBN 9781593932534 (978-1-59393-253-4) Softcover, TumbleTap, 2009. Find signed collectible books: 'The Complete Annotated Oz Squad'. The Golden Keepsake Child's Bible. ISBN 9780307168542 (978-0-307-16854-2) Hardcover, Golden Books, 2000.

The Complete Annotated Oz Squad Often imitated, never duplicated, Oz Squad is the first and best comic book inspired by the classic Wizard of Oz series of books by L.

Walmart 9781593932534. The Complete Annotated Oz Squad Often imitated, never duplicated, Oz Squad is the first and best comic book inspired by the classic Wizard of Oz series of books by L.

Oz Squad is a comic book series using characters and setting from L. Frank Baum's Land of Oz series, "updated for a more adult audience. It was created and written by Steve Ahlquist. The premise is that Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Cowardly Lion are now part of "Gale Force" (Not to be confused with the OzF5: Gale Force (2005) comic by Alias Enterprises), a Mission: Impossible type organization working to protect Oz from all manner of bizarre threats.

Often imitated, never duplicated, Oz Squad is the first and best comic book inspired by the classic Wizard of Oz series of books by L. Frank Baum. This collection is the first-ever edition to include every single issue, including the beloved Little Oz Squad Special. It is the ultimate collection and it comes with notes and annotations by the author, explaining some of the deeper mysteries and sillier aspects of the series. This edition features cover art by noted illustrator and Oz Historian David Lee Ingersoll. Alternately loved and reviled by fans, scrupulously researched by the author, this edition stands as the ultimate collection.

The Complete Annotated Oz Squad epub download

ISBN13: 978-1593932534

ISBN: 1593932537

Author: Steve Ahlquist,Andrew Murphy,Mike Sagara

Category: Graphic Novels

Subcategory: Graphic Novels

Language: English

Publisher: TumbleTap (July 4, 2009)

Pages: 380 pages

ePUB size: 1659 kb

FB2 size: 1487 kb

Rating: 4.9

Votes: 859

Other Formats: mobi rtf doc docx

Related to The Complete Annotated Oz Squad ePub books

Zololmaran
While Eric Shanower's undeniably delightful Oz graphic novels hog all the spotlight nowadays, Steve Ahlquist's more obscure and more gritty OZ SQUAD shouldn't be kicked to the curb. If you'd read L. Frank Baum's original Oz novels as a kid, then, like me, you may have pined for more Oz stories. Years ago I had opportunity to read several of Ruth Plumly Thompson's lively Oz books (Baum's publishing house had asked her to continue the series) and I'd also enjoyed the hell out of Philip José Farmer's rollicking pastiche A Barnstormer In Oz. But I wanted more. So I was over the moon, brother, when in the early '90s I glimpsed OZ SQUAD gracing the shelf of my local comic book store. Back in the day I gobbled up what I could (which weren't many issues) of this hard-to-find indie series. So best believe I'm ecstatic that this trade - THE COMPLETE ANNOTATED OZ SQUAD - has seen the light of day. THE OZ SQUAD was FABLES before FABLES.

As it turns out, creator/writer Steve Ahlquist was only able to publish ten issues and two specials of OZ SQUAD before ruination or whatever descended on him. But, within that space, he managed to contemporize and expand on L. Frank Baum's classic mythology. I understand that some diehard Oz fans are horror struck at what my man Ahlquist has wrought. These same cats would do well, then, to stay far away from WICKED.

Hey, here's a quote from the back of the trade: "Collected here for the first time are all ten issues of the cult classic comic series OZ SQUAD, the extremely rare OZ SQUAD SPECIAL and the LITTLE OZ SQUAD one-shot. With annotations by series author Steve Ahlquist detailing sources, connections, and hidden mysteries of the series."

***PLOT DETAIL SPOILERS ahead now, all the way to the end***

If you'd ever wondered how life went on in the wonderful world of Oz, then take a gander at OZ SQUAD. Our own world had become darker and more cynical and belligerent, and OZ SQUAD reflects this evolution. So, no, this series doesn't much cater to the kids. We learn that, in the intervening years, traffic between Earth and Oz had become a more common thing. Dorothy Gale, whose wish belt renders her immortal, heads up a special task force that works in concert with the CIA. Officially titled - and feel free to groan - the Gale Force, this unit - comprised of Dorothy, the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow, and the Tin Woodsman - is assigned those cases deemed too bizarre or too occult for the more standard government agencies. More often than not, these weird cases end up being Oz-related. You can see why relations between Oz and Earth are mighty strained.

The first issue informs you that Ahlquist's take on Oz is a nastier, more PG-13 one. I love the idea of Oz's genial clockwork robot, Tik-Tok, visiting Earth and going violently berserk because his morality spring just can't cope with the moral grey issues so prevalent in his new environs. Tik-Tok goes on a gleeful murder spree before the Oz Squad can corral him. Tik-Tok makes such an effective villain, I freakin' huzzahed when he fell off the wagon again later on in the series. But, yeah, that splatter gag in the first issue is really kinda sick. Okay, I grinned. But I hated myself for it.

It's interesting to see how our beloved characters have adapted to contemporary times. Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodsman, has upgraded his metal frame with modern tech and weaponry. The Cowardly Lion, when on Earth, can shapeshift to human form. The Scarecrow, brilliant and gifted (or cursed) with perfect recall, now exhibits a serious chip on his shoulder (the why of it is eventually unveiled). And Dorothy, a seasoned warrior, can fight and shoot and throw down with the best of them. And, yes, she and Ozma are an item.

To demonstrate that Ahlquist's series isn't restricted to the Oz mythos, issues #2 & #3 compel the Oz Squad to infiltrate the Eastwitch's sanctuary in order to curtail her selling plans of Tik-Tok's designs to the highest bidder. This auction attracts such interested parties as the Lilliputians, an elf deployed by Santa Claus, and one of the legendary Five Chinese Brothers. A pretty neat gathering.

The fourth issue features the return of evil Tik-Tok who returns to Earth and sets himself up as a crime lord. Next up is the OZ SQUAD SPECIAL which details Dorothy's and the infamous Russian witch Baba Yaga's involvement in the JFK conspiracy. This is followed by the pretty silly but cute LITTLE OZ SQUAD one-shot. Issues #5-10 revolve around the squad getting caught up in time travel. This arc allows us to see Scarecrow running into Leonardo da Vinci and Joan of Arc in Renaissance-era Europe, Dorothy getting into gun fights in the Old West, and Nick Chopper tragically reliving his last moments as a human right before the axe slipped.

Short-lived as this series was, it engaged its readers with rich and inventive storytelling. No, it's not at all innocent like Baum's original books. But, in the 1990s, when being grimly post-modern was the hippest thing to be, Ahlquist's revisionist slant had me big grinning and turning pages. There are neat surprises in these issues. (For example, we discover the identity of Dorothy's mother.) To cleanse the palate, I should mention how disappointing it is that several plot threads were left dangling. We never know how the Tik-Tok arc is resolved or what happened with Dorothy's pregnancy. One entry in Ahlquist's annotations does inform how the unfinished JFK arc is resolved.

Now, wanna hear something awesome? In 2011, after over a decade, Ahlquist published a new Oz Squad novel, titled OZ SQUAD: MARCH OF THE TIN SOLDIERS (available on smashwords.com and lulu.com). It features the Squad butting heads yet again with Rebecca Eastwitch and also introduces Dorothy and Ozma's son, Ozzy. So I guess that's one dangling plot thread resolved.

Now I'm off to check out Caliber Comics's OZ: A Gathering of Heroes Book One. I've got all kinds of fingers crossed.
Zololmaran
While Eric Shanower's undeniably delightful Oz graphic novels hog all the spotlight nowadays, Steve Ahlquist's more obscure and more gritty OZ SQUAD shouldn't be kicked to the curb. If you'd read L. Frank Baum's original Oz novels as a kid, then, like me, you may have pined for more Oz stories. Years ago I had opportunity to read several of Ruth Plumly Thompson's lively Oz books (Baum's publishing house had asked her to continue the series) and I'd also enjoyed the hell out of Philip José Farmer's rollicking pastiche A Barnstormer In Oz. But I wanted more. So I was over the moon, brother, when in the early '90s I glimpsed OZ SQUAD gracing the shelf of my local comic book store. Back in the day I gobbled up what I could (which weren't many issues) of this hard-to-find indie series. So best believe I'm ecstatic that this trade - THE COMPLETE ANNOTATED OZ SQUAD - has seen the light of day. THE OZ SQUAD was FABLES before FABLES.

As it turns out, creator/writer Steve Ahlquist was only able to publish ten issues and two specials of OZ SQUAD before ruination or whatever descended on him. But, within that space, he managed to contemporize and expand on L. Frank Baum's classic mythology. I understand that some diehard Oz fans are horror struck at what my man Ahlquist has wrought. These same cats would do well, then, to stay far away from WICKED.

Hey, here's a quote from the back of the trade: "Collected here for the first time are all ten issues of the cult classic comic series OZ SQUAD, the extremely rare OZ SQUAD SPECIAL and the LITTLE OZ SQUAD one-shot. With annotations by series author Steve Ahlquist detailing sources, connections, and hidden mysteries of the series."

***PLOT DETAIL SPOILERS ahead now, all the way to the end***

If you'd ever wondered how life went on in the wonderful world of Oz, then take a gander at OZ SQUAD. Our own world had become darker and more cynical and belligerent, and OZ SQUAD reflects this evolution. So, no, this series doesn't much cater to the kids. We learn that, in the intervening years, traffic between Earth and Oz had become a more common thing. Dorothy Gale, whose wish belt renders her immortal, heads up a special task force that works in concert with the CIA. Officially titled - and feel free to groan - the Gale Force, this unit - comprised of Dorothy, the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow, and the Tin Woodsman - is assigned those cases deemed too bizarre or too occult for the more standard government agencies. More often than not, these weird cases end up being Oz-related. You can see why relations between Oz and Earth are mighty strained.

The first issue informs you that Ahlquist's take on Oz is a nastier, more PG-13 one. I love the idea of Oz's genial clockwork robot, Tik-Tok, visiting Earth and going violently berserk because his morality spring just can't cope with the moral grey issues so prevalent in his new environs. Tik-Tok goes on a gleeful murder spree before the Oz Squad can corral him. Tik-Tok makes such an effective villain, I freakin' huzzahed when he fell off the wagon again later on in the series. But, yeah, that splatter gag in the first issue is really kinda sick. Okay, I grinned. But I hated myself for it.

It's interesting to see how our beloved characters have adapted to contemporary times. Nick Chopper, the Tin Woodsman, has upgraded his metal frame with modern tech and weaponry. The Cowardly Lion, when on Earth, can shapeshift to human form. The Scarecrow, brilliant and gifted (or cursed) with perfect recall, now exhibits a serious chip on his shoulder (the why of it is eventually unveiled). And Dorothy, a seasoned warrior, can fight and shoot and throw down with the best of them. And, yes, she and Ozma are an item.

To demonstrate that Ahlquist's series isn't restricted to the Oz mythos, issues #2 & #3 compel the Oz Squad to infiltrate the Eastwitch's sanctuary in order to curtail her selling plans of Tik-Tok's designs to the highest bidder. This auction attracts such interested parties as the Lilliputians, an elf deployed by Santa Claus, and one of the legendary Five Chinese Brothers. A pretty neat gathering.

The fourth issue features the return of evil Tik-Tok who returns to Earth and sets himself up as a crime lord. Next up is the OZ SQUAD SPECIAL which details Dorothy's and the infamous Russian witch Baba Yaga's involvement in the JFK conspiracy. This is followed by the pretty silly but cute LITTLE OZ SQUAD one-shot. Issues #5-10 revolve around the squad getting caught up in time travel. This arc allows us to see Scarecrow running into Leonardo da Vinci and Joan of Arc in Renaissance-era Europe, Dorothy getting into gun fights in the Old West, and Nick Chopper tragically reliving his last moments as a human right before the axe slipped.

Short-lived as this series was, it engaged its readers with rich and inventive storytelling. No, it's not at all innocent like Baum's original books. But, in the 1990s, when being grimly post-modern was the hippest thing to be, Ahlquist's revisionist slant had me big grinning and turning pages. There are neat surprises in these issues. (For example, we discover the identity of Dorothy's mother.) To cleanse the palate, I should mention how disappointing it is that several plot threads were left dangling. We never know how the Tik-Tok arc is resolved or what happened with Dorothy's pregnancy. One entry in Ahlquist's annotations does inform how the unfinished JFK arc is resolved.

Now, wanna hear something awesome? In 2011, after over a decade, Ahlquist published a new Oz Squad novel, titled OZ SQUAD: MARCH OF THE TIN SOLDIERS (available on smashwords.com and lulu.com). It features the Squad butting heads yet again with Rebecca Eastwitch and also introduces Dorothy and Ozma's son, Ozzy. So I guess that's one dangling plot thread resolved.

Now I'm off to check out Caliber Comics's OZ: A Gathering of Heroes Book One. I've got all kinds of fingers crossed.
Fearlessrunner
I still remember finding the first two issues of Oz Squad in the small comic shop in upstate NY I used to frequent. The art was realistic with a sense of whimsy and the story - re-imagining the characters of the Oz books as a 90s style adventure team - was a lot of fun.

Years before Alan Moore mashed up history and literature in his League of Extraordinary Gentlemen books, Steve Ahlquist drew on Oz, Gulliver, folklore and myth to create an interesting series.

Nearly 100 years after her first adventure in Oz, Dorthy Gale, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion must take on various threats from Oz and beyond.

This book reprints the 10 issues of Oz squad and two specials and then adds pages of annotations detailing all the references and in-jokes for those of us not versed in the 40+ Oz novels.

It's fun stuff and worth reading.

But be warned the book really could have used another edit or two. About halfway through you get the Oz Squad Special which has a magical take on the Kennedy assassination. The problem is Ahlquist parted ways with the publisher before it was finished. Digging through the annotations I learned the back story and found a quick summary of how the story was supposed to end. But until I did that I had an incomplete story that ends on a cliff hanger and is never referred to again. It would have been better for the reader if this story had been moved to the back and the explanation printed along with it.

The lovingly detailed annotations also have many sloppy typos which should have been caught before printing.

And considering how detailed the annotations are, it's odd there are no proper credits for the artist or information on when individual issues were published.

But these rough edges should not put off readers, this is a cool book deserving of a wider audience.
Fearlessrunner
I still remember finding the first two issues of Oz Squad in the small comic shop in upstate NY I used to frequent. The art was realistic with a sense of whimsy and the story - re-imagining the characters of the Oz books as a 90s style adventure team - was a lot of fun.

Years before Alan Moore mashed up history and literature in his League of Extraordinary Gentlemen books, Steve Ahlquist drew on Oz, Gulliver, folklore and myth to create an interesting series.

Nearly 100 years after her first adventure in Oz, Dorthy Gale, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion must take on various threats from Oz and beyond.

This book reprints the 10 issues of Oz squad and two specials and then adds pages of annotations detailing all the references and in-jokes for those of us not versed in the 40+ Oz novels.

It's fun stuff and worth reading.

But be warned the book really could have used another edit or two. About halfway through you get the Oz Squad Special which has a magical take on the Kennedy assassination. The problem is Ahlquist parted ways with the publisher before it was finished. Digging through the annotations I learned the back story and found a quick summary of how the story was supposed to end. But until I did that I had an incomplete story that ends on a cliff hanger and is never referred to again. It would have been better for the reader if this story had been moved to the back and the explanation printed along with it.

The lovingly detailed annotations also have many sloppy typos which should have been caught before printing.

And considering how detailed the annotations are, it's odd there are no proper credits for the artist or information on when individual issues were published.

But these rough edges should not put off readers, this is a cool book deserving of a wider audience.
Jaiarton
This received some rather negative feedback during it's run but it honestly wasn't horrible. Some things were a bit off such as the Wicked Witch of the East being alive but tbh, all it needed was a bit of exposition.
Jaiarton
This received some rather negative feedback during it's run but it honestly wasn't horrible. Some things were a bit off such as the Wicked Witch of the East being alive but tbh, all it needed was a bit of exposition.