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Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Menace - Volume 1 epub download

by Marvel Comics,Michael J. Vassallo


Marvel Masterworks is an American collection of hardcover and trade paperback comic book reprints published by Marvel Comics.

Marvel Masterworks is an American collection of hardcover and trade paperback comic book reprints published by Marvel Comics. The collection started in 1987, with volumes reprinting the issues of The Amazing Spider-Man, The Fantastic Four, The X-Men, and The Avengers. Approximately 10 issues are reprinted in each volume. In 2013, Masterworks published its 200th volume.

Marvel’s Pull List introduces new comics debuting in February 2020, and morning radio hosts Ryan Penagos, . Agent AM, and Tucker Markus argue over some of the hot takes that come with them! 3 weeks ago. 2:09. Trailers & Extras DOCTOR STRANGE: SURGEON SUPREME Trailer Marvel Comics. The impossible has happened!

Unlock the world of Marvel Digital Comics! Your key for reading Marvel Unlimited and Digital Comic purchases across multiple devices. Featuring an introduction by noted Atlas Era historian, Dr. Michael J. Vassallo. Collecting TALES OF SUSPENSE.

Unlock the world of Marvel Digital Comics! Your key for reading Marvel Unlimited and Digital Comic purchases across multiple devices. Get the latest news, original content, and special offers from Marvel. Collecting TALES OF SUSPENSE

Ships from and sold by Amazing Comics. Menace is, so far, the most memorable of the Atlas Era Marvel Masterworks that I have read. Other titles that I have perused through from that time period include: Atlas Era Heroes (featuring the Sub-Mariner, Captain America, and Marvel Boy from the 1950's), Strange Tales, and Tales to Astonish. Excellent artwork and short stories, over a half-century later, continue to amaze even the readers of the most contemporary graphic novels.

Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Journey Into Mystery - Volume 3 (Marvel Masterworks (Unnumbered)). Includes a six-page essay from Dr. Vassallo titled The History of Atlas Horror/Fantasty (Origins and Pre-Code 1949-1951). Strange Tales is the longest running horror title from Marvel pre-cursor Atlas, lasting 100 issues until The Human Torch took over in issue 101. Until I read this essay, I had no idea just how prolific Atlas was in the 50s.

Marvel Masterworks book This volume shows off some of the best pre-Code Horror comics that came from one of the most underrated team of comicbook.

Marvel Masterworks book. Start by marking Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Menace, Vol. 1 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This volume shows off some of the best pre-Code Horror comics that came from one of the most underrated team of comicbook artists and Stan Lee, who wrote each story in every issue until One of the best things about Menace Comics is Lee's use of 2nd person in his storytelling.

Tell us if something is incorrect. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer. Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Menace - Volume 1. Specifications.

Topped off with an introduction by Atlas Era scholar, Dr. Vassallo, there’s no doubt that it’s time to join up and set out on the battlefield!

Marvel Masterworks – Atlas Era Battlefield Vol. 1 (2011) : In the early 1950s with the Korean War raging Marvel Comics’ predecessor, Atlas, launched a bevy of war comics featuring the heroism and horrors of human conflict. With challenging scripts by Stan Lee’s stable of Atlas Era scribes these ed pre-Code comics delve into a challenging range of themes-from tales of the American fightin’ . Topped off with an introduction by Atlas Era scholar, Dr. Vassallo, there’s no doubt that it’s time to join up and set out on the battlefield!

Short summary describing this volume. Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Menace.

Short summary describing this volume. Publisher for this volume.

Items related to Marvel Masterworks Atlas Era Menace: 1. Marvel Comics; Michael J. Vassallo Marvel Masterworks Atlas Era Menace: 1. ISBN 13: 9780785135098. Marvel Masterworks Atlas Era Menace: 1.

In 1953 horror comics were king and Atlas editor-in-chief, Stan Lee, launched a new title to make a bid for the throne-and that title was MENACE! Backed by the best of the best in his art stable-Bill Everett, Russ Heath, Joe Maneely, Gene Colan, John Romita, Joe Sinnott, George Tuska-Stan's new title became a high-water mark for pre-Code horror. Chock full of page after page of werewolves, vampires, zombies, ghosts, ghouls, double-dealing women and stone-cold killers with a sense of morality as dark as the ink on the page, MENACE lived up to its name-and how! It also showed hints of the Mighty Marvel future to come with running editorial commentary by Stan, reader contests, and characters like the infamous Zombie by Stan and Bill Everett, who would become the Marvel Age's own killer zombie, Simon Garth. MENACE is a must-have for all aficionados of comics' rollicking pre-Code days and the perfect entry point for readers looking to take their first adventure into the Atlas Era! Collecting MENACE #1-11

Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Menace - Volume 1 epub download

ISBN13: 978-0785135098

ISBN: 078513509X

Author: Marvel Comics,Michael J. Vassallo

Category: Graphic Novels

Subcategory: Graphic Novels

Language: English

Publisher: Marvel; First Edition edition (November 11, 2009)

Pages: 304 pages

ePUB size: 1713 kb

FB2 size: 1946 kb

Rating: 4.4

Votes: 478

Other Formats: azw rtf lit doc

Related to Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Menace - Volume 1 ePub books

Groll
This comic book was Atlas(Marvel) Comics answer to EC Comics horror comics of the 1950s. The stories were all written by Stan Lee(at first), with art by the best artists working for Atlas. All stories are told by the narrator as if the reader was the main character in the story. For example, the first story in the first issue starts out, "Your name is Lou Briggs... You live in a plain, furnished room in an ordinary apartment house in Upper Manhatten!". Every story ends with a "twist" ending. The artwork is usually excellent, and most of the stories are good, although the comics got worse near the end of the run, after Stan Lee stopped writing. All eleven issues of the comic book are included here, beautifully reproduced. Even the text pages from the comic books(which most readers at the time didn't bother to read) are included. Most of this book is quite enjoyable, if you like old horror comics. I should also mention that Menace featured the first appearances of two characters who were revived by Marvel years later; The Zombie and The Human Robot from Agents Of Atlas.
Groll
This comic book was Atlas(Marvel) Comics answer to EC Comics horror comics of the 1950s. The stories were all written by Stan Lee(at first), with art by the best artists working for Atlas. All stories are told by the narrator as if the reader was the main character in the story. For example, the first story in the first issue starts out, "Your name is Lou Briggs... You live in a plain, furnished room in an ordinary apartment house in Upper Manhatten!". Every story ends with a "twist" ending. The artwork is usually excellent, and most of the stories are good, although the comics got worse near the end of the run, after Stan Lee stopped writing. All eleven issues of the comic book are included here, beautifully reproduced. Even the text pages from the comic books(which most readers at the time didn't bother to read) are included. Most of this book is quite enjoyable, if you like old horror comics. I should also mention that Menace featured the first appearances of two characters who were revived by Marvel years later; The Zombie and The Human Robot from Agents Of Atlas.
Qusserel
Enjoyable collection of pre-Comics Code horror stories written by Stan Lee and drawn by the artists at Atlas Comics (now Marvel). Art and stories vary in quality but taken as a run of 11 issues one of the better titles Atlas published in the days when comics were vilified by bluenoses (and a certain psychiatrist called Dr. Fredric Wertham, M.D.), investigated by a Senate committee, even at times thrown on bonfires and burned. As horrified as parents and teachers were in the early 1950s there isn't anything in this book a 10-year-old of this modern era should not see or can't handle. And of course it's a real kick for horror comics fans to see what all the uproar was about all those years ago.
Qusserel
Enjoyable collection of pre-Comics Code horror stories written by Stan Lee and drawn by the artists at Atlas Comics (now Marvel). Art and stories vary in quality but taken as a run of 11 issues one of the better titles Atlas published in the days when comics were vilified by bluenoses (and a certain psychiatrist called Dr. Fredric Wertham, M.D.), investigated by a Senate committee, even at times thrown on bonfires and burned. As horrified as parents and teachers were in the early 1950s there isn't anything in this book a 10-year-old of this modern era should not see or can't handle. And of course it's a real kick for horror comics fans to see what all the uproar was about all those years ago.
Erthai
If you want to compare this to the 50's EC titles then EC blows this stuff away. If you want to call this the B-movie version of pre-code horror comics you are right on track.

In this presentation the overall look of the book is great. Most of the splash pages are worthy of a poster.However, some of the stories are way too short. Average 5 pages. Not a lot of room for development and some endings are highly predictable

For cool art and cheap thrills this is worth picking up...even if the in depth story telling is lacking.
Erthai
If you want to compare this to the 50's EC titles then EC blows this stuff away. If you want to call this the B-movie version of pre-code horror comics you are right on track.

In this presentation the overall look of the book is great. Most of the splash pages are worthy of a poster.However, some of the stories are way too short. Average 5 pages. Not a lot of room for development and some endings are highly predictable

For cool art and cheap thrills this is worth picking up...even if the in depth story telling is lacking.
Rarranere
I really enjoyed this Atlas re-release. The quality of the re-production is great and the pages are crisp and clean. I think this is the best Atlas reprint I have purchased. The original series only ran for 11 issues which are all here. The writing and artwork is nearly up to the industry standards of the EC brand. Loved this book, wish there were more Menace out there.
Rarranere
I really enjoyed this Atlas re-release. The quality of the re-production is great and the pages are crisp and clean. I think this is the best Atlas reprint I have purchased. The original series only ran for 11 issues which are all here. The writing and artwork is nearly up to the industry standards of the EC brand. Loved this book, wish there were more Menace out there.
Ferri - My name
Classic pre-code horror. Love Bill Everett's art it's the reason I got this anthology, but the other contributors are tremendously talented too,
Ferri - My name
Classic pre-code horror. Love Bill Everett's art it's the reason I got this anthology, but the other contributors are tremendously talented too,
Original
Very fun collection of older Marvel horror tales from many years ago.
Several classics, in my opinion.
Definitely worth the money.
I enjoyed several weeks of fun reading.
Full color, too.
MAB
Original
Very fun collection of older Marvel horror tales from many years ago.
Several classics, in my opinion.
Definitely worth the money.
I enjoyed several weeks of fun reading.
Full color, too.
MAB
Iell
...the answer was "We surrender!"

This book was widely billed as Atlas' finest horror title, specially published to compete with the very successful Al Feldstein scripted EC horror titles. The stories were scripted by Stan Lee and the artists were to be the cream of the Atlas crop - Bill Everett, Russ Heath, Joe Maneely, Gene Colan, etc.

The results were less than stellar. The art was (and is) all it was supposed to be but the stories were imperceptably different in quality than the other Atlas titles and well below the EC titles. Few stories show any originality and many are childish or just plain silly.

The good news is that taken on its own terms, as a reprint of half century old stories and art that the reader might have a more academic than literary interest in, the book works well. The reproduction is superb and the introduction by Dr. Michael Vassallo places the stories in their proper cultural context.

I give the book 4 stars for its historical interest but for the reader uninterested in the history looking for entertainment there is little to be had here.
Iell
...the answer was "We surrender!"

This book was widely billed as Atlas' finest horror title, specially published to compete with the very successful Al Feldstein scripted EC horror titles. The stories were scripted by Stan Lee and the artists were to be the cream of the Atlas crop - Bill Everett, Russ Heath, Joe Maneely, Gene Colan, etc.

The results were less than stellar. The art was (and is) all it was supposed to be but the stories were imperceptably different in quality than the other Atlas titles and well below the EC titles. Few stories show any originality and many are childish or just plain silly.

The good news is that taken on its own terms, as a reprint of half century old stories and art that the reader might have a more academic than literary interest in, the book works well. The reproduction is superb and the introduction by Dr. Michael Vassallo places the stories in their proper cultural context.

I give the book 4 stars for its historical interest but for the reader uninterested in the history looking for entertainment there is little to be had here.
Menace is, so far, the most memorable of the Atlas Era Marvel Masterworks that I have read. Other titles that I have perused through from that time period include: Atlas Era Heroes (featuring the Sub-Mariner, Captain America, and Marvel Boy from the 1950's), Strange Tales, and Tales to Astonish.

Excellent artwork and short stories, over a half-century later, continue to amaze even the readers of the most contemporary graphic novels. Themes are often centered around watching what you say (Mad Hatter, eat your heart out!), how the apparently best laid plans of the devious can go astray in a humorous or morbid context, and just how unwise it can be to make a deal with the devil. Notwithstanding, along with the outstanding story plots, which contain very few holes by the way, are the illustrative sketches that make each frame come to life. Before the Jim Steranko psychedelic artwork that would be immortalized as beyond what mere words could describe some fifteen years later, eye-catching contributions in this early fifties collection that were perfectly in sync with Stan Lee's mind's eye were the highly detailed sketches and inks of the then very young and talented Joe Sinnott, John Romita, Sr. and Gene Colan.

Okay, some of you might ask,"What makes Menace so special in comparison to the prolific volumes that have been contributed by Stan Lee and the cohorts from his generation?" The answer is this. Each story is original, each tale is easy to recall and thus not likely to be mixed up with other works of fiction, and each ending is so profound that it will likely endure in the reader's memory bank for years to come. In other words, for those who have an appreciation for the separate acts of the movie, Pulp Fiction, or who opt to eschew the other Twilight Zone episodes in favor of the early ones written exclusively by Rod Serling, Menace, not surprisingly, will likely delight.
Menace is, so far, the most memorable of the Atlas Era Marvel Masterworks that I have read. Other titles that I have perused through from that time period include: Atlas Era Heroes (featuring the Sub-Mariner, Captain America, and Marvel Boy from the 1950's), Strange Tales, and Tales to Astonish.

Excellent artwork and short stories, over a half-century later, continue to amaze even the readers of the most contemporary graphic novels. Themes are often centered around watching what you say (Mad Hatter, eat your heart out!), how the apparently best laid plans of the devious can go astray in a humorous or morbid context, and just how unwise it can be to make a deal with the devil. Notwithstanding, along with the outstanding story plots, which contain very few holes by the way, are the illustrative sketches that make each frame come to life. Before the Jim Steranko psychedelic artwork that would be immortalized as beyond what mere words could describe some fifteen years later, eye-catching contributions in this early fifties collection that were perfectly in sync with Stan Lee's mind's eye were the highly detailed sketches and inks of the then very young and talented Joe Sinnott, John Romita, Sr. and Gene Colan.

Okay, some of you might ask,"What makes Menace so special in comparison to the prolific volumes that have been contributed by Stan Lee and the cohorts from his generation?" The answer is this. Each story is original, each tale is easy to recall and thus not likely to be mixed up with other works of fiction, and each ending is so profound that it will likely endure in the reader's memory bank for years to come. In other words, for those who have an appreciation for the separate acts of the movie, Pulp Fiction, or who opt to eschew the other Twilight Zone episodes in favor of the early ones written exclusively by Rod Serling, Menace, not surprisingly, will likely delight.